Beef For Protein

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May we introduce to you beef for protein. You can get your beef of the best quality at this portal because it tests the beef that is provided by manufacturers. This portal has been serving its customers since 1996 with the aim to provide them with what they want. If you’re looking for a great tasting and protein packed meal, then you’re in luck. I’m going to give you a list of my favorite beef protein sources.

Beef 101: Nutrition Facts and Health Effects

Beef is the meat of cattle (Bos taurus).

It is categorized as red meat — a term used for the meat of mammals, which contains higher amounts of iron than chicken or fish.

Usually eaten as roasts, ribs, or steaks, beef is also commonly ground or minced. Patties of ground beef are often used in hamburgers.

Processed beef products include corned beef, beef jerky, and sausages.

Fresh, lean beef is rich in various vitamins and minerals, especially iron and zinc. Therefore, moderate intake of beef can be recommended as part of a healthy diet.

This article tells you everything you need to know about beef.

Nutrition facts

Beef is primarily composed of protein and varying amounts of fat.

Here are the nutrition facts for a 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving of broiled, ground beef with 10% fat content :

  • Calories: 217
  • Water: 61%
  • Protein: 26.1 grams
  • Carbs: 0 grams
  • Sugar: 0 grams
  • Fiber: 0 grams
  • Fat: 11.8 grams

Protein

Meat — such as beef — is mainly composed of protein.

The protein content of lean, cooked beef is about 26–27% .

Animal protein is usually of high quality, containing all nine essential amino acids needed for the growth and maintenance of your body .

As the building blocks of proteins, amino acids are very important from a health perspective. Their composition in proteins varies widely, depending on the dietary source.

Meat is one of the most complete dietary sources of protein, its amino acid profile being almost identical to that of your own muscles.

For this reason, eating meat — or other sources of animal protein — may be of particular benefit after surgery and for recovering athletes. In combination with strength exercise, it also helps maintain and build muscle mass

Fat

Beef contains varying amounts of fat — also called beef tallow.

Apart from adding flavor, fat increases the calorie content of meat considerably.

The amount of fat in beef depends on the level of trimming and the animal’s age, breed, gender, and feed. Processed meat products, such as sausages and salami, tend to be high in fat.

Lean meat is generally about 5–10% fat .

Beef is mainly composed of saturated and monounsaturated fat, present in approximately equal amounts. The major fatty acids are stearic acid, oleic acid, and palmitic acid.

Food products from ruminant animals — such as cows and sheep — also harbor trans fats known as ruminant trans fats .

Unlike their industrially-produced counterparts, naturally-occurring ruminant trans fats are not considered unhealthy.

The most common is conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which is found in beef, lamb, and dairy products

CLA has been linked to various health benefits — including weight loss. Still, large doses in supplements may have harmful metabolic consequences

SUMMARY

Beef protein is highly nutritious and may promote muscle maintenance and growth. Beef contains varying amounts of fat, including CLA, which has been linked to health benefits.

Vitamins and minerals

The following vitamins and minerals are abundant in beef:

  • Vitamin B12. Animal-derived foods, such as meat, are the only good dietary sources of vitamin B12, an essential nutrient that is important for blood formation and your brain and nervous system.
  • Zinc. Beef is very rich in zinc, a mineral that is important for body growth and maintenance.
  • Selenium. Meat is generally a rich source of selenium, an essential trace element that serves a variety of functions in your body .
  • Iron. Found in high amounts in beef, meat iron is mostly in the heme form, which is absorbed very efficiently.
  • Niacin. One of the B vitamins, niacin (vitamin B3) has various important functions in your body. Low niacin intake has been associated with an increased risk of heart disease
  • Vitamin B6. A family of B vitamins, vitamin B6 is important for blood formation and energy metabolism.
  • Phosphorus. Widely found in foods, phosphorus intake is generally high in the Western diet. It’s essential for body growth and maintenance.

Beef contains many other vitamins and minerals in lower amounts.

Processed beef products, such as sausages, may be particularly high in sodium (salt).

SUMMARY

Meat is an excellent source of various vitamins and minerals. These include vitamin B12, zinc, selenium, iron, niacin, and vitamin B6.

Other meat compounds

Like plants, meat contains a number of bioactive substances and antioxidants, which may affect health when consumed in adequate amounts.

Some of the most prominent compounds in beef include:

  • Creatine. Abundant in meat, creatine serves as an energy source for muscles. Creatine supplements are commonly taken by bodybuilders and may be beneficial for muscle growth and maintenance.
  • Taurine. Found in fish and meat, taurine is an antioxidant amino acid and a common ingredient in energy drinks. It’s produced by your body and important for heart and muscle function .
  • Glutathione. An antioxidant found in most whole foods, glutathione is particularly abundant in meat. It’s found in higher amounts in grass-fed beef than in grain-fed
  • Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). CLA is a ruminant trans fat that may have various health benefits when consumed as part of a healthy diet .
  • Cholesterol. This compound serves many functions in your body. In most people, dietary cholesterol has little effect on blood cholesterol and is generally not considered a health concern

SUMMARY

Animal meat like beef contains a number of bioactive substances, such as creatine, taurine, CLA, and cholesterol.

Health benefits of beef

Beef is a rich source of high-quality protein and various vitamins and minerals. As such, it can be an excellent component of a healthy diet.

Maintaining muscle mass

Like all types of meat, beef is an excellent source of high-quality protein.

It contains all of the essential amino acids and is referred to as a complete protein.

Many people — especially older adults — don’t consume enough high-quality protein.

Inadequate protein intake may accelerate age-related muscle wasting, increasing your risk of an adverse condition known as sarcopenia

Sarcopenia is a serious health issue among older adults but can be prevented or reversed with strength exercises and increased protein intake.

The best dietary sources of protein are animal-derived foods, such as meat, fish, and milk products.

In the context of a healthy lifestyle, regular consumption of beef — or other sources of high-quality protein — may help preserve muscle mass, reducing your risk of sarcopenia.

Improved exercise performance

Carnosine is a compound important for muscle function

It’s formed in your body from beta-alanine, a dietary amino acid found in high amounts in fish and meat — including beef.

Supplementing with high doses of beta-alanine for 4–10 weeks has been shown to lead to a 40–80% increase in carnosine levels in muscles

In contrast, following a strict vegetarian diet may lead to lower levels of carnosine in muscles over time

In human muscles, high levels of carnosine have been linked to reduced fatigue and improved performance during exercise

Additionally, controlled studies suggest that beta-alanine supplements can improve running time and strength

Anemia prevention

Anemia is a common condition, characterized by a decreased number of red blood cells and reduced ability of the blood to carry oxygen.

Iron deficiency is one of the most common causes of anemia. The main symptoms are tiredness and weakness.

Beef is a rich source of iron — mainly in the form of heme iron.

Only found in animal-derived foods, heme iron is often very low in vegetarian — and especially vegan — diets

Your body absorbs heme iron much more efficiently than non-heme iron — the type of iron in plant-derived foods.

Thus, meat not only contains a highly bioavailable form of iron but also improves the absorption of non-heme iron from plant foods — a mechanism that has not been fully explained and is referred to as the “meat factor.”

A few studies indicate that meat can increase the absorption of non-heme iron even in meals that contain phytic acid, an inhibitor of iron absorption

Another study found that meat supplements were more effective than iron tablets at maintaining iron status in women during a period of exercise

Therefore, eating meat is one of the best ways to prevent iron deficiency anemia.

SUMMARY

Rich in high-quality protein, beef may help maintain and grow muscle mass. Its beta-alanine content may reduce fatigue and improve exercise performance. Plus, beef may prevent iron deficiency anemia.

Beef and heart disease

Heart disease is the world’s most common cause of premature death.

It’s a term for various conditions related to the heart and blood vessels, such as heart attacks, strokes, and high blood pressure.

Observational studies on red meat and heart disease provide mixed results.

Some studies detect an increased risk for both unprocessed and processed red meat, a few showed an increased risk for processed meat only, and others reported no significant association at all

Keep in mind that observational studies cannot prove cause and effect. They only show that meat eaters are either more or less likely to get a disease.

It’s possible that meat consumption is just a marker for unhealthy behavior, but negative health effects are not caused by the meat itself.

For example, many health-conscious people avoid red meat because it has been claimed to be unhealthy.

Additionally, people who eat meat are more likely to be overweight and less likely to exercise or eat a lot of fruits, vegetables, and fiber (35Trusted Source45Trusted Source46Trusted Source).

Of course, most observational studies try to correct for these factors, but the accuracy of the statistical adjustments may not always be perfect.

Saturated fat and heart disease

Several theories have been proposed to explain the link between meat consumption and heart disease.

The most popular is the diet-heart hypothesis — the idea that saturated fat increases your risk of heart disease by raising cholesterol levels in your blood.

The diet-heart hypothesis is controversial and the evidence mixed. Not all studies observe a significant link between saturated fat and heart disease

Still, most health authorities advise people to limit their intake of saturated fat — including beef tallow.

If you’re worried about saturated fat, consider choosing lean meat, which has been shown to have positive effects on cholesterol levels

In the context of a healthy lifestyle, it’s unlikely that moderate amounts of unprocessed lean beef have any adverse effects on heart health.

SUMMARY

It’s unclear whether meat consumption or saturated fats in beef increase your risk of heart disease. Some studies observe a link, but others don’t.

health benefits of eating beef

Nutritionist Michael Joseph publishes the Nutrition Advance website in the US which provides independent, evidence-based nutrition and health information backed by peer-reviewed studies as evidence. Here he takes a closer look at the health benefits of beef. 

A generation or two ago, our parents and grandparents viewed beef as a nutritious health food.

But now? These days it’s much different, and opinion is split between whether beef is healthful or harms our health.

Some of the more extreme vegan views even call for the authorities to remove meat from the food supply.

Whatever our opinion on red meat might be, there are some important health benefits of eating beef.

This article takes a close look at 11 of them.

1. Beef Provides a Large Source of L-Carnitine

L-carnitine is an amino acid that occurs naturally in meat products.

In the table below, we can see the L-carnitine content of beef compared to some other animal foods and plant foods ;

Why is L-Carnitine Important?

Among other functions, L-carnitine plays a part in fat metabolism.

As part of this, L-Carnitine does the job of transporting fats into our mitochondria for burning.

It’s important to clarify that our body can synthesize sufficient amounts of L-carnitine for general needs; this makes it a non-essential amino acid.

The body synthesizes L-Carnitine within the liver and the process relies on the amino acids L-lysine and L-methionine .

As a result, deficiencies are rare.

However, research suggests that a higher dietary intake of L-Carnitine may have some positive health impacts.

Various studies show the following findings;

Heart Health 

A meta-analysis of randomized trials suggests that L-carnitine improves patient outcomes. Specifically, it exerts an effect on hypertension, oxidative stress, nitric oxide, and inflammation.

A further systematic review found that L-carnitine is associated with a 27% reduction in all-cause mortality in heart failure patients .

Diabetes

A systematic review shows that higher L-carnitine intake in type 2 diabetes patients improves fasting glucose levels and the overall cholesterol profile .

Weight Loss

According to a systematic review and meta-analysis of nine randomized controlled trials, subjects using L-carnitine supplementation lost “significantly more weight” than the control group .

It’s worth noting that while there are many L-carnitine supplements around, the absorption rate is poor in comparison to beef.

In fact, our body only absorbs around 14-18% of the synthetic form of the nutrient .

Key Point: L-carnitine is an amino acid that naturally occurs in beef. It has a positive impact on various health markers.

2. Beef Provides the “Master Antioxidant” Glutathione

Commonly known as the ‘master antioxidant,’ glutathione has a score of research linking it to ;

  • Anti-aging benefits
  • Increasing longevity
  • Preventing illness
  • Reducing the risk of chronic disease
  • Strengthening the immune system

It helps protect every cell in our body from cellular damage, which can lead to many chronic diseases.

On the other hand, a deficiency in glutathione contributes to oxidative stress and inflammation .

As a result, keeping glutathione levels high is important for our overall health.

Subsequently, the question becomes “how can we keep our glutathione levels high?”

Endogenous Glutathione Production and Dietary Sources

First of all, our body produces glutathione endogenously.

In other words, our body uses raw materials (in this case: amino acids) to make glutathione.

For this process to occur, we should have adequate levels of the amino acids cysteine, glutamate, and glycine.

These amino acids are known as glutathione precursors, and each of these amino acids is present in beef.

On the positive side, beef also contains a reasonably high source of complete (pre-formed) dietary glutathione.

Key Point: Keeping our glutathione levels high is critical for good health, and beef is a food that helps us to achieve this. Glutathione detoxes our body better than any ‘detox plan’ or supplement can.

3. Beef is High in Protein and Helps Improve Muscle Mass

There are numerous reasons why we should strive to ensure a sufficient protein intake and these include;

  • Protein is the building block our body uses to repair and make bone, skin, and cartilage.
  • Sufficient protein helps us to build and maintain lean muscle mass.
  • Out of all macronutrients, protein is the most satiating, and it discourages food cravings.

Beef is packed with health-promoting amino acids, and it’s one of the single biggest sources of protein in the human diet.

For instance, a 6oz (170g) portion of 80% lean beef provides 46g protein.

Should we opt for a leaner variety of beef, the protein content can be even higher .

The Importance of Lean Mass

As we age, building—or at least holding on to—lean mass should be a priority.

Research shows that older adults with lower muscle mass are at a higher risk of mortality.

Speaking bluntly, the more skeletal muscle mass someone loses as they age, the higher their risk of an earlier death .

Also, the rate of muscle protein synthesis rapidly drops as we age, making it a lot harder to build and maintain muscle .

Considering this, we should ensure we’re eating a sufficient amount of protein – this is especially essential for elderly people.

On this note, beef is one of the best protein-rich foods out there.

Key Point: Protein is essential for optimal health, and especially so as we age. Beef provides an abundant amount of this macronutrient.

4. Beef is Extremely Rich in Minerals

If you’re looking to increase your intake of various minerals, then beef is one of the best options to consider.

First of all, beef is relatively nutrient-dense in minerals.

Here we can see the mineral content of 80% lean beef ;

As shown in the table, beef provides more than half of the day’s recommended amount of selenium and zinc.

Many people have deficiency issues with some of these minerals.

So, the nutritional value of beef can help fight prevalent global deficiencies in iron, magnesium, and zinc.

Key Point: Beef is rich in several essential minerals—especially iron, phosphorus, selenium, and zinc.

5. Eating Beef Helps Prevent Iron Deficiency Anemia

We touched on mineral deficiencies in the last point, but iron deficiency anemia deserves a mention of its own.

Sadly, iron deficiency anemia is a growing epidemic around the world.

In a developed country such as the United States, nutrient deficiencies shouldn’t be a cause of death, yet anemia kills thousands every year.

To be exact, the latest release of statistics showed that Anemia hospitalized 146,000 Americans in one year. 5,219 of these people died .

Globally it’s even worse, and according to the World Health Organization, 1.62 billion people suffer from iron deficiency anemia.

Heme and Non-Heme Iron

There are two types of iron available in food, and we refer to them as heme and non-heme iron.

  • Heme Iron: Heme iron is the most bioavailable form of iron, and meat and other animal foods exclusively contain it.
  • Non-Heme Iron: Non-heme iron is found in plant foods such as fruit, vegetables, and nuts. In comparison to heme iron, our body finds it more difficult to absorb.

One of the best health benefits of beef meat is that it contains a substantial amount of heme iron.

The best source of all? Beef liver.

Interestingly, anemia disproportionately affects females. Perhaps this isn’t a huge surprise when we think about how society seems to shame women who eat meat.

The imagery of women smiling while eating a bowl of salad is quite ubiquitous.

Key Point: Eat more beef to help prevent iron deficiency anemia.

THE POWER OF BEEF’S PROTEIN

If there was a protein contest, beef would surely be crowned the king! Among the powerful package of 10 essential nutrients beef is known for, protein may be one of the most notable. In fact, one 3 oz cooked serving of beef provides 50% of your Daily Value (25 grams) of this important nutrient—making it an excellent source!

A wealth of researchhas linked protein to favorable lifestyle markers such as healthy body weight and/or weight loss, maintaining and building muscle, and overall diet satisfaction. When you’re looking for ways to improve your health, manage your weight or satisfy your appetite, consider all that protein can do for you:

  • Feeling hungry? People who eat a higher-protein diet (about 30% of daily calories from protein) feel more satisfied, which may help prevent overeating.2
  • Protein helps support strong, lean bodies. Eating at least 4 ounces of high-quality protein from foods like beef at each meal provides your body with energy to lead an active lifestyle.3
  • Protein may help cut the fat. Research has shown exercise is more effective for weight management when paired with a higher-protein diet, and beef provides the amino acids necessary for building and replenishing muscles.4

Let’s explore the benefits of protein:

PROTEIN THROUGHOUT THE DAY

So let’s ditch those fad diets and consider how we fill our plates at each meal. It’s not only important to just get protein in at dinner or lunch, but to spread it throughout your day. This can really maximize the benefits above. Aim for 25-30 grams of protein at each meal and you’ll start to feel the difference.

Here’s what 25-30 grams throughout the day looks like (and a simple comparison of beef to plant proteins):

Protein Throughout the Day
Protein Comparison

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