Beef For Sukiyaki

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Why SukiyakiI was once asked what sort of meal Beef for Sukiyaki was. I answered: Beef for Sukiyaki is a type of meal. And now I feel the need to explain what sort of meal it is, and why it’s become my favorite. When it comes to beef there’s nothing like the taste of grilled meat. The aroma that hits your nose when you open the lid on a bubbling pile of thinly sliced beef are sure to strike up an instant craving for Beef for Sukiyaki.

Traditional Sukiyaki (Japanese Beef Hot Pot) Recipe

How to make flavorful, traditional beef hot pot at home.

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Spring has just begun—which means there is just enough time for one more sukiyaki supper before the hot weather arrives. Sukiyaki is a Japanese Winter meal, cooked tableside and often eaten around New Years. To cook it the traditional way you’ll need a butane burner or electric hot plate. If you enjoy hotpot-style cooking these two things are worth having anyway.

The usual ingredients are thinly sliced beef, tofu and a variety vegetables, typically cabbage, mushrooms, and onions. Many people dip their hot cooked beef and vegetables in a beaten raw egg. If this makes you squeamish, or the risk of eating raw egg out weighs the reward, just skip it.

Recipe Facts

Prep:10 mins

Cook:40 mins

Active:20 mins

Total:50 mins

Serves:4 servings

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Ingredients

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  • 2/3 cup mirin
  • 2/3 cup sake
  • 2/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1 1/3 cups dashi
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 1/2 pounds sirloin beef, sliced into 1/4- to 1/8th-inch strips
  • 8 ounces firm tofu, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 8 ounces mushrooms, sliced (shiitake, portabello, button, enoki or a variety)
  • 1 yellow onion, sliced into thin rings
  • 8 scallions, cut into 2 inch pieces
  • 1 small head bok choy or napa cabbage, leaves cut into 1- to 2-inch segmen
  • 1 cup short grain rice
  • 8 ounces shirataki or udon noodles
  • 4 eggs (optional)

Directions

  1. Bring mirin, sake, dashi and sugar to a simmer and stir until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and reserve.
  2. Arrange beef and tofu on separate platters (or dinner plates) cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate. Arrange mushrooms, onion, scallions, and bok choy on a serving platter and set aside.
  3. Rinse rice in a fine mesh strainer until water runs clear. Place in a small pot and cover with 2 cups water, bring to a simmer then turn heat to low and cover with tight fitting lid. Steam until all the water is absorbed, about 30 minutes.
  4. Set up butane burner or electric hot plate, and carefully ignite. Place a thick bottomed, low sided pan over burner and pour in sauce mixture. Bring to a simmer.
  5. Divide rice between 4 small bowls. Place platters of ingredients around burner and cook as you eat by transferring to simmering broth and cooking to desired doneness. If desired, break egg into separate bowl, beat and use to dip steaming hot ingredients into.

Special equipment

Fine-mesh strainer, tabletop butane burner or electric hot plate, low-sided thick bottomed skillet

NUTRITION FACTS(PER SERVING)
802CALORIES
29gFAT
57gCARBS
63gPROTEIN

SUKIYAKI – A JAPANESE ONE POT MEAT

Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com

The first time I had Sukiyaki, I was living and working in Beijing. One of the things I miss the most about living there was the work lunches near my office in Sanlitun, an area filled with great restaurants and shopping. In China generally, lunchtime is serious business. There’s little concept of, “I was so busy with work, I haven’t had a chance to eat lunch.” Noon hits, and it seems like every office building empties out to fill up restaurants and cafeterias across the city.

At lunchtime, I would go out with coworkers to have every kind of meal imaginable. Hand-pulled beef noodle soup in a trendy, tucked away noodle bar, Yunnan-style hot pot, Cantonese roast meats, California-style sushi at Hatsune, the list goes on. And all these lunches were pretty affordable too. (I wasn’t making much in the way of salary at the time, believe me.)

In other words, the decadence levels at weekday lunches were off the charts. Especially when compared to the microwaved leftovers I eat working in New York nowadays.

One of the most memorable lunches I’d have every couple weeks in Beijing was an individual Sukiyaki meal at a Japanese restaurant a few minutes’ walk from my office. I was introduced to the place by a coworker, and she described it as “Japanese hot pot.” I was relatively new to my new Beijing home and job, and I remember thinking, as I sat there dipping thin slices of fatty beef into rich egg yolk amidst other fashionable Beijing diners, “I could get used to this.”

WHAT IS JAPANESE SUKIYAKI?

Japanese Sukiyaki has several key ingredients. Enoki mushrooms, napa cabbage, fatty beef, noodles, and tong ho, a leafy green from the chrysanthemum family with a very particular, slightly medicinal flavor that actually goes great with the sweetness of the Sukiyaki sauce/broth. (I actually normally don’t like this vegetable, but I did really enjoy it in this dish!) That said, if you can’t find tong ho, you can substitute another leafy green like bok choy or spinach, or simply leave it out.

Everything is cooked in a bubbling pot, and the Sukiyaki is often served with raw egg yolk to dip the beef in. I really loved the raw egg, but I do have to do my duty as blogger and friend to warn you that consuming raw or undercooked eggs can increase risk of foodborne illness! The egg yolk component here is totally optional, but if you do want to do it, at least purchase pasteurized eggs!

Sukiyaki is also traditionally cooked at the table, but if you don’t have a portable electric cooktop or gas burner, you can always cook/simmer it on the stove and then transfer it to the table afterwards!

Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com

SUKIYAKI RECIPE: INSTRUCTIONS

In a pot over a portable electric or gas cooktop (or just your regular stove) over medium heat, add 2 tablespoons sake, ¼ cup mirin, 1 tablespoon brown sugar, and ¼ cup soy sauce in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, turn off the heat, make sure all the sugar is dissolved, and transfer to a bowl.

Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com

Then prepare all your sukiyaki ingredients––the tofu slices, rehydrated shiitake mushrooms, enoki mushrooms, napa cabbage, tong ho, and scallions. Set aside on a plate. Soak the dried vermicelli noodles in water for 10 minutes.

Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com

Heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in the pan. Fry the white parts of the scallions in the oil for 2 minutes. Chop the green parts of the scallions finely and set aside.

Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com

In the pan with the scallions, add the sliced beef. Sear the beef for 10 seconds, and add a drizzle of your sukiyaki sauce.

Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com

Fry the meat until it just begins to brown––it should still be a bit pink. Remove from the pot and set aside.

Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com

Add the rest of your sukiyaki sauce and 2 cups stock. Bring to a boil.

Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com

Add the tofu, mushrooms, napa cabbage, and tong ho to the pot in sections. Also drain the vermicelli noodles you soaked and add them to the pot. Cover the pot and bring to a boil.

Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com

Simmer until the ingredients are cooked through, about 5-7 minutes.

Remove the cover, add the beef back to the pot. Sprinkle with the chopped scallions, and enjoy with rice and egg yolk (if desired).

Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com
Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com
Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com
Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com
Sukiyaki, by thewoksoflife.com

SUKIYAKI: A JAPANESE ONE POT MEAL

Sukiyaki is a Japanese dish of fatty beef, vegetables, tofu, and noodles simmered in a sweet sauce. It’s a fun way to mix things up, and it’s easy to make at home!

course:beef

cuisine:japanese

SERVES:3

PREP:20 minutes

COOK:20 minutes

TOTAL:40 minutes

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE SUKIYAKI SAUCE:

  • ▢2 tablespoons sake
  • ▢¼ cup mirin
  • ▢1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • ▢¼ cup soy sauce

TO PREPARE THE SUKIYAKI:

  • ▢½ block firm tofu(sliced into ½ inch thick slices)
  • ▢5 dried shiitake mushrooms (rehydrated)
  • ▢1 package enoki mushrooms (ends trimmed and rinsed)
  • ▢2 cups napa cabbage (cut into 2-inch pieces)
  • ▢2 cups tong ho (chrysanthemum greens, washed)
  • ▢2 scallions (white and green parts separated)
  • ▢1 bundle dried mung bean vermicelli noodles (or shirataki noodles)
  • ▢1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • ▢12 oz. thinly sliced fatty beef
  • ▢2 cups dashi stock (mushroom soaking liquid, or chicken stock)
  • ▢2 cups steamed rice
  • ▢2 egg yolks (pasteurized, optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

  • In a pot over a portable electric or gas cooktop (or just your regular stove) over medium heat, add 2 tablespoons sake, ¼ cup mirin, 1 tablespoon brown sugar, and ¼ cup soy sauce in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, turn off the heat, make sure all the sugar is dissolved, and transfer to a bowl.
  • Then prepare all your sukiyaki ingredients––the tofu slices, rehydrated shiitake mushrooms, enoki mushrooms, napa cabbage, tong ho, and scallions. Set aside on a plate. Soak the dried vermicelli noodles in water for 10 minutes.
  • Heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in the pan. Fry the white parts of the scallions in the oil for 2 minutes. Chop the green parts of the scallions finely and set aside.
  • In the pan with the scallions, add the sliced beef. Sear the beef for 10 seconds, and add a drizzle of your sukiyaki sauce. Fry the meat until it just begins to brown––it should still be a bit pink. Remove from the pot and set aside.
  • Add the rest of your sukiyaki sauce and 2 cups stock. Bring to a boil, and add the tofu, mushrooms, napa cabbage, and tong ho to the pot in sections. Also drain the vermicelli noodles you soaked and add them to the pot. Cover the pot and bring to a boil. Simmer until the ingredients are cooked through, about 5-7 minutes.
  • Remove the cover, add the beef back to the pot. Sprinkle with the chopped scallions, and enjoy with rice and egg yolk (if desired).

NUTRITION FACTS

Calories: 751kcal (38%) Carbohydrates: 68g (23%) Protein: 37g (74%) Fat: 35g (54%) Saturated Fat: 14g (70%) Cholesterol: 211mg (70%) Sodium: 1178mg (49%) Potassium: 859mg (25%) Fiber: 3g (12%) Sugar: 11g (12%) Vitamin A: 2289IU (46%) Vitamin C: 21mg (25%) Calcium: 262mg (26%) Iron: 5mg (28%)

Sukiyaki Recipe (Video) すき焼き

Cozy up at your next get-together with friends and family with this homemade Japanese Sukiyaki recipe. Served with seared marbled beef and a variety of vegetables cooked in a soy sauce broth, it makes a heart-warming meal to share at the table!

Sukiyaki cooked in a cast iron pot.

Sukiyaki (すき焼き) is a popular Japanese hot pot dish which is often cooked and served at the table, similar to Shabu Shabu (しゃぶしゃぶ).

What’s Sukiyaki?

If you are familiar with the Japanese hot pot dish, you have probably heard of Shabu Shabu. With Shabu Shabu, you cook thinly sliced beef and pork in a clear kombu-based broth. The flavor is subtle and you dip the food in a ponzu or sesame-based sauce.

Stir the well-marbled shabu shabu beef in a kombu dashi broth.
Shabu Shabu

Sukiyaki is completely different; the food is cooked in a sweet and salty soy sauce-based broth and full of bold flavors straight from the pot.

Sukiyaki cooked in a cast iron pot.
Sukiyaki

Besides the broth, the pot used to cook sukiyaki is also quite different from Shabu Shabu. Traditionally it is cooked in a cast-iron pot while Shabu Shabu is cooked in a Japanese clay pot called donabe (土鍋), and the thinly sliced beef (but slightly thicker than Shabu Shabu meat) are seared first in the pot before adding ingredients and broth.

Despite having a different flavor and cooking pot, most Sukiyaki ingredients are similar to Shabu Shabu, such as leafy vegetables, tofu, shiitake mushroom, and so on.

Kansai Style vs. Kanto Style

As my mom’s side of the family is from Osaka (Kansai) and my dad’s side is from Tokyo (Kanto), my sukiyaki recipe is a combination of both Kansai style and Kanto style.

In Kansai (Osaka) area, we sear the meat and season with sugar, soy sauce, and sake. Then we enjoy some of the meat first before the rest of the ingredients are added to the pot. However in the Kanto (Tokyo) area, we make Sukiyaki Sauce (Warishita, 割り下) first, and all the ingredients are cooked at the same time in the Sukiyaki Sauce.

Sukiyaki Beef

For the sliced beef, if you shop at Japanese grocery stores, look in the meat section. There is usually pre-sliced beef, and they are specifically labeled as beef for Shabu Shabu or Sukiyaki.

Marbled beef sold in Japan

The Japanese like to splurge and enjoy really good quality meat for both Sukiyaki and Shabu Shabu. Wagyu (beef from cows raised in Japan) is very expensive ($40/lb), so typically each person only enjoys about 120-150 grams of sliced meat.

When you shop for the meat, find a well-marbled piece of meat so that fat of the meat becomes tender when you eat. Otherwise, it’ll very chewy after being cooked.

If you can’t find pre-sliced beef, you can try slicing the beef chuck at your home.

Thinly Sliced Meat

Substitutions of ingredients for Sukiyaki

Some of the ingredients we put in Sukiyaki (or Shabu Shabu) like napa cabbage and shungiku may not be easy to find in where you live. If so, use available mushrooms and leafy vegetables such as cabbage, spinach, and bok choy.

You can substitute Leeks and scallions/green onions for Tokyo Negi. Instead of shirataki noodles (yam noodles), you can use vermicelli.

Cooking at Dining Table

Sukiyaki is usually cooked over a portable stove at the dining table and each person uses their own chopsticks to pick up the ingredients from the pot and add more ingredients as the food disappears from the pot.

It’s a fun dinner for family and friends’ get-together, and not to mention, all you have to do is to chop ingredients before dinner time!

How to Eat Sukiyaki the “Authentic” Way

I am a bit hesitant and actually slightly reluctant to talk about the “authentic” way the Japanese enjoy Sukiyaki as some of you may not find it appetizing. However, I do want to let you know in case you end up enjoying this dish in Japan and you won’t get caught off guard.

So, in Japan, a lot of people dip the cooked ingredients in raw eggs. I know, I can almost hear “eww” from some of my readers but that’s the fact. I actually recommend you try if you are in Japan where eggs are sometimes safe to consume raw. The sweetness from raw egg coats well with salty vegetables and meat and it balances out the flavors very well.

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