Calcium Containing Vegetables And Fruits

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Calcium containing vegetables and fruits are very essential part of good health. Different types of the list of calcium containing vegetables and fruits are given bellow in this article.. Calcium is a mineral that enhances bone growth, structure and hardness. It’s also beneficial for maintaining the healthy teeth.

Calcium containing vegetables and fruits, in your diet may give you the calcium that you need. Calcium is essential for stronger and healthier bones.

Calcium Containing Vegetables And Fruits

The benefits of calcium

Your body needs calcium to build and maintain strong bones. Your heart, muscles and nerves also need calcium to function properly.

Some studies suggest that calcium, along with vitamin D, may have benefits beyond bone health: perhaps protecting against cancer, diabetes and high blood pressure. But evidence about such health benefits is not definitive.

The risks of too little calcium

Not getting enough calcium could result in a number of health problems including related to weak bones:

  • Children may not reach their full potential adult height
  • Adults may have low bone mass, which is a risk factor for osteoporosis

Children and adolescents are at risk, but so are adults age 50 and older.

vegetables and fruits containing calcium

Fruits and vegetables that contain 200mg or more of calcium (20% of the daily value) are considered “high in calcium.”

Some of these are:

Fruits & Vegetables that Provide a Good Source of Calcium

Fruits and vegetables that contain 100mg to less than 190mg of calcium(10%-19% of the daily value) qualify as “good source of calcium.”

The following are examples of these:

Nuts:
  • Almonds
  • Walnuts
  • Hazelnuts
  • Brazil Nuts
  • Sesame seeds
  • Tahini Pate
Vegetables:
  • Lettuce
  • Kale
  • Bok Choy/Pak Choi
  • Broccoli
  • Okra
  • Cress
  • Rhubarb
  • Carrots
  • Tomatoes
Fruits:
  • Orange
  • Apple
  • Banana
  • Apricot
  • Currants
  • Died Figs
  • Rasins/dried Grapes
Beans and Lentils
  • Lentils
  • Chick Peas
  • White beans
  • Red beans
  • Green/Fresh beans
  • Black eyed Peas
MILK:
  • Semi-Skimmed
  • Skimmed
  • Whole
  • Milkshake
  • Sheep Milk
  • Coconut Milk
  • Soy drink
  • Soy drink, calcium enriched
  • Rice drink
  • Oat milk
  • Almond milk
Meat and Fish:
  • Egg
  • Red Meat
  • Chicken
  • Fish (e.g. Cod, Trout, Herring, Whitebait)
  • Tuna, canned
  • Sardines in oil, canned
  • Smoked Salmon
  • Shrimp
Yoghurt:
  • Flavoured Yoghurt
  • Yoghurt mixed with Fruit
  • Natural Yoghurt
Cheese:

Most cheeses are a good source of calcium.

List of Fruits High in Calcium

A glass of orange juice

#1: Fortified Orange Juice

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
349mg
(27% DV)
140mg
(11% DV)
596mg
(46% DV)

Prickly Pears

#2: Prickly Pears

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
83mg
(6% DV)
56mg
(4% DV)
273mg
(21% DV)

Tangerines

#3: Tangerines

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
72mg
(6% DV)
37mg
(3% DV)
140mg
(11% DV)

Slices of orange

#4: Oranges

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
72mg
(6% DV)
40mg
(3% DV)
170mg
(13% DV)

Slices of kiwifruit

#5: Kiwifruit

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
61mg
(5% DV)
34mg
(3% DV)
111mg
(9% DV)

Mullberries

#6: Mulberries

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
55mg
(4% DV)
39mg
(3% DV)
181mg
(14% DV)

Blackberries on the stem

#7: Blackberries

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
42mg
(3% DV)
29mg
(2% DV)
135mg
(10% DV)

Half a guava

#8: Guavas

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
30mg
(2% DV)
18mg
(1% DV)
53mg
(4% DV)

Papayas

#9: Papaya

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
29mg
(2% DV)
20mg
(2% DV)
93mg
(7% DV)

Passion Fruit

#10: Passion-Fruit (Granadilla)

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
28mg
(2% DV)
12mg
(1% DV)
25mg
(2% DV)

Printable list of high calcium fruits.

Dried Fruits High in Calcium

Food Serving Calcium
#1 Dried Figs

View(Source)
per cup 19% DV
(241mg)
#2 Zante Currants

View (Source)
per cup 10% DV
(127mg)
#3 Golden Seedless Raisins

View (Source)
per cup 7% DV
(93mg)
#4 Dried Apricots

View (Source)
per cup 6% DV
(72mg)
#5 Goji Berries

View (Source)
5 tbsp 4% DV
(53mg)

Factors which Affect Calcium Absorption

  • Amount of Calcium Consumed – The more calcium you consume, the less you absorb. Though consuming more calcium will increase your total level.(2)
  • Age – Children absorb about 60% of the calcium from foods, while adults absorb only 20%. Calcium absorption decreases with age and people over 50 should eat more calcium.(2)
  • Pregnancy – Pregnant women absorb more calcium.(2)
  • Vitamin D Intake – Vitamin D enhances calcium absorption. It can be found in foods or created by exposing skin to sunshine.(2)
  • Phytic and Oxalic Acid – Even though some studies suggest phytic and oxalic acid affects calcium absorption, people eating a balanced diet will not be affected. Further, the percent daily value already accounts for this absorption factor. High amounts of oxalic acid are found in plant foods like spinach, collard greens, sweet potatoes, rhubarb, and beans. Phytic acid is found in wholewheat bread and wheat bran.(2)
  • Sodium, Protein, Alcohol, Caffeine (Coffee and Tea) – A diet high in sodium, protein, alcohol, and caffeine (coffee and tea) can reduce absorption and retention of calcium by causing more calcium to be excreted. Alcohol also interferes with the metabolism of vitamin D.

Sources of Low Calcium

Calcium is so abundant in the average human diet that searching for foods entirely without calcium is nearly impossible. Though there are some obscure exceptions that contain no calcium whatsoever, the best way to tackle a low calcium diet is by eliminating foods that are particularly high in the mineral and including those that are low in it, such as the wide variety of low calcium vegetables available.

According to UCSF Health, the amount of calcium an adult between ages 19 and 50 should be receiving daily is 1,000 milligrams. These foods have less than 100 milligrams of calcium based on a 1-cup serving, so they are safe in moderation on a low calcium diet:

  • Brie cheese: This cheese has only 50 milligrams of calcium.
  • Parmesan cheese: Parmesan only has 70 milligrams of calcium.
  • Legumes: Between 15 and 50 milligrams of calcium depending on the variety; always check the nutrition label.
  • Pinto beans: 75 milligrams
  • Soybeans: With 100 milligrams, soybeans are right on the cusp, but they can still contribute to a low calcium diet.
  • Tempeh: 75 milligrams
  • White beans: 70 milligrams
  • Brown rice: 50 milligrams
  • Corn tortillas: 85 milligrams, but this can vary; check the nutrition label.
  • Sunflower seeds: 50 milligrams

Low calcium vegetables — with less than 100 milligrams of calcium per cup — include:

  • Bok choy: 40 milligrams
  • Chicory: 40 milligrams
  • Collard greens: 50 milligrams
  • Corn: With 10 milligrams of calcium in a cup, corn is one of the best vegetables for a low calcium diet.
  • Dandelion greens: 80 milligrams
  • Kale: 55 milligrams
  • Kelp: 60 milligrams
  • Mustard greens: 40 milligrams
  • Turnip greens: 80 milligrams

These are just some of the foods with a comparatively low calcium count; there may be others you find by checking the nutrition labels on products in your supermarket.

The risks of too little calcium

If you don’t get enough calcium, you could face health problems related to weak bones:

  • Children may not reach their full potential adult height.
  • Adults may have low bone mass, which is a risk factor for osteoporosis.

Many Americans don’t get enough calcium in their diets. Children and adolescents are at risk, but so are adults age 50 and older.

Calcium requirements

How much calcium you need depends on your age and sex.

Calcium: Recommended daily amount
Men
19-50 years 1,000 mg
51-70 years 1,000 mg
71 and older 1,200 mg
Women
19-50 years 1,000 mg
51 and older 1,200 mg

The recommended upper limit for calcium is 2,500 mg a day for adults 19 to 50. For those 51 and older, the limit is 2,000 mg a day.

Calcium and diet

Your body doesn’t produce calcium, so you must get it through other sources. Calcium can be found in a variety of foods, including:

  • Dairy products, such as cheese, milk and yogurt
  • Dark green leafy vegetables, such as broccoli and kale
  • Fish with edible soft bones, such as sardines and canned salmon
  • Calcium-fortified foods and beverages, such as soy products, cereal and fruit juices, and milk substitutes

To absorb calcium, your body also needs vitamin D. A few foods naturally contain small amounts of vitamin D, such as canned salmon with bones and egg yolks. You can also get vitamin D from fortified foods and sun exposure. The RDA for vitamin D is 600 international units (15 micrograms) a day for most adults.

Who should consider calcium supplements?

Even if you eat a healthy, balanced diet, you may find it difficult to get enough calcium if you:

  • Follow a vegan diet
  • Have lactose intolerance and limit dairy products
  • Consume large amounts of protein or sodium, which can cause your body to excrete more calcium
  • Are receiving long-term treatment with corticosteroids
  • Have certain bowel or digestive diseases that decrease your ability to absorb calcium, such as inflammatory bowel disease or celiac disease

In these situations, calcium supplements may help you meet your calcium requirements. Talk with your doctor or dietitian about whether calcium supplements are right for you.

common calcium sources

Do calcium supplements have risks?

Calcium supplements aren’t for everyone. For instance, if you have a health condition that causes excess calcium in your bloodstream (hypercalcemia), you should avoid calcium supplements.

It’s not definitive, but there may be a link between high-dose calcium supplements and heart disease. The evidence is mixed and more research is needed before doctors know the effect calcium supplements may have on heart attack risk.

A similar controversy surrounds calcium and prostate cancer. Some studies have shown that high calcium intake from dairy products and supplements may increase risk, whereas another more recent study showed no increased risk of prostate cancer associated with total calcium, dietary calcium or supplemental calcium intakes.

Until more is known about these possible risks, it’s important to be careful to avoid excessive amounts of calcium. As with any health issue, it’s important to talk to your doctor to determine what’s right for you.

Types of calcium supplements

Several different kinds of calcium compounds are used in calcium supplements. Each compound contains varying amounts of the mineral calcium — referred to as elemental calcium. Common calcium supplements may be labeled as:

  • Calcium carbonate (40% elemental calcium)
  • Calcium citrate (21% elemental calcium)
  • Calcium gluconate (9% elemental calcium)
  • Calcium lactate (13% elemental calcium)

The two main forms of calcium supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is cheapest and therefore often a good first choice. Other forms of calcium in supplements include gluconate and lactate.

In addition, some calcium supplements are combined with vitamins and other minerals. For instance, some calcium supplements may also contain vitamin D or magnesium. Check the ingredient list to see which form of calcium your calcium supplement is and what other nutrients it may contain. This information is important if you have any health or dietary concerns.

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