Calcium Content In Vegetables

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The calcium content in vegetables ranges from 0.12 mg in okra to 10.0 mg in sesame seed, according to NutritionData. The USDA National Nutrient Database lists the calcium content of each food item with a calcium content greater than 250 mg per 100 g of dry weight. Calcium is an essential nutrient that can help your body build strong bones and teeth.

Calcium Content In Vegetables

Calcium is a mineral necessary for the growth and maintenance of strong teeth and bones, nerve signaling, muscle contraction, and secretion of certain hormones and enzymes.

Top 20 Vegetables Highest in Calcium
A deficiency in calcium can lead to numbness in the fingers and toes, muscle cramps, convulsions, lethargy, loss of appetite, and abnormal heart rhythm.Finding calcium in vegetables and fruits is a concern for vegans, or those on a raw food diet. While there is some evidence that oxalates in vegetables can hinder calcium absorption, they are still a good source of calcium. Futhermore, and the calculated daily value (DV) already takes into account absorption and bio-availability. For more, see the section on calcium absorption.Vegetables high in calcium include collard greens, spinach, turnip greens, kale, mustard greens, beet greens, bok choy, okra, Swiss chard, and broccoli raab. The DV (daily value) for calcium is 1300mg.

List of Vegetables High in Calcium

Collard Green Leaves

#1: Collard Greens

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
268mg
(21% DV)
141mg
(11% DV)
855mg
(66% DV)

A Bowl of Spinach

#2: Spinach

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
245mg
(19% DV)
136mg
(10% DV)
1183mg
(91% DV)

Note: Some claim that oxalates in leafy green vegetables (like spinach) harm calcium absorption. Studies on the effect of oxalates are mixed. (4,5,6) In general, leafy greens as part of a balanced diet are a good source of calcium.

Turnip Greens

#3: Turnip Greens

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
197mg
(15% DV)
137mg
(11% DV)
1370mg
(105% DV)

Leaves of Kale

#4: Kale

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
172mg
(13% DV)
132mg
(10% DV)
943mg
(73% DV)

Mustard Greens

#5: Mustard Greens

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
165mg
(13% DV)
118mg
(9% DV)
908mg
(70% DV)

Beet Greens

#6: Beet Greens

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
164mg
(13% DV)
114mg
(9% DV)
844mg
(65% DV)

Bok Choy

#7: Pak-Choi (Bok Choy)

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
158mg
(12% DV)
93mg
(7% DV)
1550mg
(119% DV)

Sliced Okra

#8: Okra

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
123mg
(9% DV)
77mg
(6% DV)
700mg
(54% DV)

Swiss Chard

#9: Swiss Chard

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
102mg
(8% DV)
58mg
(4% DV)
580mg
(45% DV)

Broccoli Raab (Rapini)

#10: Broccoli Raab (Rapini)

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
100mg
(8% DV)
118mg
(9% DV)
944mg
(73% DV)

Podded green peas

#11: Podded Peas

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
94mg
(7% DV)
59mg
(5% DV)
227mg
(17% DV)

An acorn squash

#12: Acorn Squash

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
90mg
(7% DV)
44mg
(3% DV)
157mg
(12% DV)

Half a Butternut Squash

#13: Butternut Squash

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
84mg
(6% DV)
41mg
(3% DV)
205mg
(16% DV)

Parsley

#14: Parsley

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
83mg
(6% DV)
138mg
(11% DV)
767mg
(59% DV)

Sweet Potatoes

#15: Sweet Potatoes

Calcium
per Cup Mashed
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
77mg
(6% DV)
30mg
(2% DV)
59mg
(5% DV)

Celeriac

#16: Celeriac

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
67mg
(5% DV)
43mg
(3% DV)
205mg
(16% DV)

Broccoli Stalk

#17: Broccoli

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
62mg
(5% DV)
40mg
(3% DV)
229mg
(18% DV)

Brussels Sprouts

#18: Brussels Sprouts

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
56mg
(4% DV)
36mg
(3% DV)
200mg
(15% DV)

Soybean Sprouts

#19: Soybean Sprouts

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
55mg
(4% DV)
59mg
(5% DV)
146mg
(11% DV)
  • 1 cup of boiled soybeans (edamame) provides 13% DV (175mg) of calcium

Green Beans

#20: Green (Snap) Beans

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
55mg
(4% DV)
44mg
(3% DV)
251mg
(19% DV)

See All 200 Vegetables High in Calcium

Factors which Affect Calcium Absorption

  • Amount of Calcium Consumed – The more calcium you consume, the less you absorb. Though consuming more calcium will increase your total level.
  • Age – Children absorb about 60% of the calcium from foods, while adults absorb only 20%. Calcium absorption decreases with age and people over 50 should eat more calcium.
  • Pregnancy – Pregnant women absorb more calcium.
  • Vitamin D Intake – Vitamin D enhances calcium absorption. It can be found in foods or created by exposing skin to sunshine.
  • Phytic and Oxalic Acid – Even though some studies suggest phytic and oxalic acid affect calcium absorption, people eating a balanced diet will not be affected. Further, the percent daily value already accounts for this absorption factor. High amounts of oxalic acid are found in plant foods like spinach, collard greens, sweet potatoes, rhubarb, and beans. Phytic acid is found in wholewheat bread and wheat bran.
  • Sodium, Protein, Alcohol, Caffeine (Coffee and Tea) – A diet high in sodium, protein, alcohol, and caffeine (coffee and tea) can reduce absorption and retention of calcium by causing more calcium to be excreted. Alcohol also interferes with the metabolism of vitamin D.

How Much Calcium Do I Need?

Calcium, as well as potassium, vitamin D and fiber, is one of the four nutrients many Americans – including children — fall short of in their diets as outlined by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. These four are identified as “nutrients of public health concern” because many Americans are not consuming enough and not getting enough of these nutrients is linked to health concerns.

Serving a glass of milk at meals is a simple way to increase not only your daily calcium intake, but also three of the four of these important nutrients. Milk is the top food source of calcium and vitamin D in the American diet. While getting the recommended three daily servings milk or milk products not only helps to increase how much calcium you’re getting, it also can help you get closer to the recommended amount of other nutrients you may otherwise be falling short on — especially vitamin D, but also magnesium and vitamin A.

How much calcium you need to consume on a daily basis to meet depends on your age — and calcium intake increases for children and teens, and again for adults older than 70.

Life Stage Recommended Amount
Birth to 6 months 200 mg
Infants 7–12 months 260 mg
Children 1–3 years 700 mg
Children 4–8 years 1,300 mg
Children 9–13 years 1,300 mg
Teens 14–18 years 1,300 mg
Adults 19–50 years 1,300 mg
Adult men 51–70 years 1,300 mg
Adult women 51–70 years 1,300 mg
Adults 71 years and older 1,200 mg
Pregnant and breastfeeding teens 1,300 mg
Pregnant and breastfeeding adults 1,300 mg

Caring for your teeth means more than brushing and cleaning between them every day. It also means paying attention to the foods you eat.

One of the most important nutrients for healthy teeth is calcium. Calcium strengthens the hard outer shell of your tooth called enamel, which is your teeth’s defense against erosion and cavities. To protect your teeth and get the 1,000-2,000 mg daily recommended amount of calcium, many people turn to dairy products like milk, cheese and yogurt.

If you’re lactose intolerant or need to limit dairy, there are a number of foods that can still give you the calcium you need. Calcium is found naturally in some foods, while others – such as juice, tofu and even waffles – are now fortified with added calcium.

Think green when you want to add a nutritional boost to your plate. Leafy green vegetables like kale (179 mg per cup), frozen collard greens (357 mg per cup) and cooked spinach (257 mg per cup) provide you plenty of calcium. They are also powerhouses when it comes to nutrients, low in calories and high in fiber.

Eating bones might sound fishy, but the canning process makes them soft, so once you mix the salmon into a recipe, the bones are almost impossible to detect. Try mixing canned salmon with lemon juice, Greek yogurt, a tiny bit of mayo and salt and pepper for a delicious salad topper. Or add it to pasta or rice bowls. At 366 milligrams of calcium and 930 IU of vitamin D per 6 ounces, you’ll be doing your own bones a big favor.

Calcium is a mineral necessary for the growth and maintenance of strong teeth and bones, nerve signaling, muscle contraction, and secretion of certain hormones and enzymes.

Top 20 Vegetables Highest in Calcium
A deficiency in calcium can lead to numbness in the fingers and toes, muscle cramps, convulsions, lethargy, loss of appetite, and abnormal heart rhythm.Finding calcium in vegetables and fruits is a concern for vegans, or those on a raw food diet. While there is some evidence that oxalates in vegetables can hinder calcium absorption, they are still a good source of calcium. Futhermore, and the calculated daily value (DV) already takes into account absorption and bio-availability. For more, see the section on calcium absorption.

Vegetables high in calcium include collard greens, spinach, turnip greens, kale, mustard greens, beet greens, bok choy, okra, Swiss chard, and broccoli raab. The DV (daily value) for calcium is 1300mg.

CALCIUM CONTAINING FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Collard Green Leaves

#1: Collard Greens

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
268mg
(21% DV)
141mg
(11% DV)
855mg
(66% DV)

A Bowl of Spinach

#2: Spinach

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
245mg
(19% DV)
136mg
(10% DV)
1183mg
(91% DV)

Note: Some claim that oxalates in leafy green vegetables (like spinach) harm calcium absorption. Studies on the effect of oxalates are mixed. (4,5,6) In general, leafy greens as part of a balanced diet are a good source of calcium.

Turnip Greens

#3: Turnip Greens

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
197mg
(15% DV)
137mg
(11% DV)
1370mg
(105% DV)

Leaves of Kale

#4: Kale

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
172mg
(13% DV)
132mg
(10% DV)
943mg
(73% DV)

Mustard Greens

#5: Mustard Greens

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
165mg
(13% DV)
118mg
(9% DV)
908mg
(70% DV)

Beet Greens

#6: Beet Greens

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
164mg
(13% DV)
114mg
(9% DV)
844mg
(65% DV)

Bok Choy

#7: Pak-Choi (Bok Choy)

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
158mg
(12% DV)
93mg
(7% DV)
1550mg
(119% DV)

Sliced Okra

#8: Okra

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
123mg
(9% DV)
77mg
(6% DV)
700mg
(54% DV)

Swiss Chard

#9: Swiss Chard

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
102mg
(8% DV)
58mg
(4% DV)
580mg
(45% DV)

Broccoli Raab (Rapini)

#10: Broccoli Raab (Rapini)

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
100mg
(8% DV)
118mg
(9% DV)
944mg
(73% DV)

Podded green peas

#11: Podded Peas

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
94mg
(7% DV)
59mg
(5% DV)
227mg
(17% DV)

An acorn squash

#12: Acorn Squash

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
90mg
(7% DV)
44mg
(3% DV)
157mg
(12% DV)

Half a Butternut Squash

#13: Butternut Squash

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
84mg
(6% DV)
41mg
(3% DV)
205mg
(16% DV)

Parsley

#14: Parsley

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
83mg
(6% DV)
138mg
(11% DV)
767mg
(59% DV)

Sweet Potatoes

#15: Sweet Potatoes

Calcium
per Cup Mashed
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
77mg
(6% DV)
30mg
(2% DV)
59mg
(5% DV)

Celeriac

#16: Celeriac

Next Article

Calcium
per Cup
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
67mg
(5% DV)
43mg
(3% DV)
205mg
(16% DV)

Broccoli Stalk

#17: Broccoli

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
62mg
(5% DV)
40mg
(3% DV)
229mg
(18% DV)

Brussels Sprouts

#18: Brussels Sprouts

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
56mg
(4% DV)
36mg
(3% DV)
200mg
(15% DV)

Soybean Sprouts

#19: Soybean Sprouts

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
55mg
(4% DV)
59mg
(5% DV)
146mg
(11% DV)
  • 1 cup of boiled soybeans (edamame) provides 13% DV (175mg) of calcium

Green Beans

#20: Green (Snap) Beans

Calcium
per Cup Cooked
Calcium
per 100g
Calcium
per 200 Calories
55mg
(4% DV)
44mg
(3% DV)
251mg
(19% DV)

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