Diet Plan For 14 Year Old Female

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Diet plan for 14 year old female is a vital component for growth and development. However, the options of food to choose from can be overwhelming and confusing, and some may lack nutrients that are vital to the nutritional needs of your child.

A Healthy Diet for a 14 Year Old to Eat

Three young women eating at a cafe

Three young teens are eating at a cafe.

Image Credit: Purestock/Purestock/Getty Images

The average 14-year-old girl should consume approximately 1,800 calories each day, while a 14-year-old boy needs around 2,200 calories, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In a healthy diet, the majority of these calories should come from whole grains, lean protein, low- or nonfat dairy and a variety of fruits and vegetables. Seek help from a pediatrician or dietitian if you need help developing a nutritious eating plan for your 14-year-old.

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Fill Up on Fruits and Vegetables

The USDA recommends that half of any meal a 14-year-old eats should consist of fruits and vegetables. Doing so should help girls consume the recommended 2 1/2 cups of vegetables and 1 1/2 cups of fruit each day. Boys need to consume the recommended 3 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit daily. A teen’s vegetables should be fresh or frozen and eaten raw or prepared with a low-fat method like steaming, grilling or stir-frying. Fruits should be fresh or canned in 100 percent fruit juice, not sweetened or packed in heavy syrup.

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Pick Lean Protein

About 25 percent of a 14-year-old’s plate at a meal should contain a lean, protein-rich food. Skinless chicken or turkey, fish, shellfish, eggs, nuts, seeds, beans, legumes, soy products and low-fat cuts of beef or pork can all fulfill this requirement. A 14-year-old girl needs 5 ounces daily; a boy of the same age should have 6 1/2 ounces. Each ounce is equivalent to one whole egg, 1/4 cup of cooked beans or legumes, 1/2 ounce of nuts or seeds and 1 ounce of meat, seafood or poultry. Teens should avoid fatty cuts of red meat and processed items like hot dogs or ham.

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Go for Whole Grains

Grains should make up the remaining 25 percent of a typical 14-year-old’s meal. Each day, a girl in this age group should aim to consume 6 ounces of grains, while boys need about 8 ounces. A slice of bread, a small corn or flour tortilla, 1/2 cup of cooked cereal grains like rice or oatmeal, 1/2 cup of cooked pasta, 1 cup of ready-to-eat breakfast cereal and 3 cups of popcorn all count as 1 ounce. At least half of a 14-year-old’s daily grains should be whole grains such as brown rice, whole-wheat pasta, quinoa, bulgur and whole-grain breads and tortillas.

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Include Dairy Daily

A serving of a calcium-rich food like dairy should accompany each meal, with 1 cup of milk or yogurt, 2 cups of cottage cheese, 1/3 cup of shredded cheese and 1 1/2 ounces of hard cheese like mozzarella or cheddar all counting as a single serving. A 14-year-old needs three servings of these foods daily. To avoid excess fat, teens should choose low- or nonfat over whole-milk dairy products. Vegan, vegetarian or lactose-intolerant teens who don’t consume dairy products can get the calcium they need by regularly eating soy products, dark leafy greens like kale, canned salmon or sardines and calcium-fortified items such as some juices, breakfast cereals and plant milks.

What Should a Teenage Girl Eat in a Day? Recommendations From a Dietitian

Teenage girls are growing, learning, developing, changing so much and becoming more independent and responsible. Teen females need a lot of nutrients and energy, especially during pubertygrowth spurts, and for physical activity and teen athletes. It would be unwise to fuel their bodies with unhealthy choices like sugary soda, chips, pizza, and snack foods. Nutritious foods can be just as delicious, easy, and a lot more energizing.

Teenage girls should focus their food choices on evenly spaced meals and snacks during the day, and develop healthy habits. Teen females should eat on whole grains, fruits and vegetables, legumes, meat and beans, and lowfat dairy products each day, and limit processed and packaged snack foods and fast foods.

Need some more tips and ideas for what to eat and how much? Get the best tips from a registered dietitian nutritionist. Keep reading below and also check out my list of The 10 Best and 10 Worst Foods for Teenagers to Eat.

What Does a Teenage Girl Need in Her Diet?

The best way to make sure a teen girl is getting all the nutrients and the right foods she needs in her diet is to focus on variety and balance between all the different food groups. Each food group provides different vitamins and minerals that are important for normal growth and function. Here’s an example of how much and what to eat from each food group:

  • Dairy– Eat 3 servings per day. One serving equals 1 cup of milk/yogurt, 1/3 cup shredded cheese, 1 1/2 ounces hard cheese, or 2 cups cottage cheese etc.
  • Grains– Eat 6 servings per day. One serving equals 1 slice bread, 1/2 cup cooked grains (oatmeal, rice, pasta), 5-7 crackers, 3 cups popcorn, or 1 cup breakfast cereal. Choose mostly whole wheat grains instead of white.
  • Fruits– Eat 1 1/2 cups per day. 1 medium fruit is equal to about 1 cup. 1/2 cup of dried fruit and 1 cup 100% juice are also equal to a 1 cup serving.
  • Vegetables– Eat 2 1/2 cups per day. 1 cup of whole, sliced, etc. 2 cups of lettuce/leafy greens or 1/2 cup of cooked vegetables is equal to a 1 cup serving size.
  • Protein Foods – Eat about 5-6 servings per day. A serving is 1 ounce of cooked meat/poultry/seafood/lunchmeat, 1 egg, 1/2 ounce of nuts/seeds, 1 Tablespoon nut butter, 1/4 cup cooked beans/lentils/tofu, or 2 Tablespoons of hummus.

Focusing meals on vegetables, fruit, lean protein, and whole grains is a great way to stay healthy and get a balance of food for a healthy body.

How Much Should A Teenage Girl Eat in a Day?

Teenage females should eat enough in the day to fuel their body for all their daily activities including thinking, moving, breathing, chores, focusing in school, sports practice, walking to class, even growing, etc.

There’s a lot going on and adolescent girls need a lot of calories to supply the right amount of energy each day. Most moderately active teenage girls need around 2,000 calories per day of food to provide the right amount of fuel for their body functions, growth, and movement.

1. Stir-fries

Bowl of stir-fried noodles with prawns and vegetables

When encouraging your teen to cook, the best approach can be to help them organise the ingredients they need – and then take a step back. You can always be on hand if they need it, but helicopter parenting will almost certainly not be welcome in a hot kitchen.

The humble stir-fry is a great starting point for the beginner cook, because it has few instructions, it’s speedy, simple and you can pack them full of fresh veg. From pineapple, beef & ginger to simple vegetable & prawn noodles, these recipes make the perfect springboard for cooking balanced meals, independently.

2. Pizza

Pizza slices topped with tomato sauce, cheese and basil leaves

Let your teen channel some Neapolitan vibes by making their own pizza from scratch. Although this may sound daunting for younger teens, it only takes a handful of simple ingredients to make the homemade tomato sauce and bread base. Otherwise, if you’re short of time, just use a shop-bought pizza base that they can layer on their favourite ingredients. After they see how easy it is, you may start to get requests for a bespoke stone pizza oven!

3. Curry

Thai green curry with beans and rice in a bowl

Making a curry is all about the art of balancing a large array of flavours and textures to create a full bodied, fragrant dish rather than a clashing calamity. It’s always best to start with the basics, so teens can experiment to taste and add extras as they go along. Our vegan Thai curry uses tofu cubes and plenty of veg to provide bulk, while curry paste, lime and coriander provide a fresh burst of flavours to compliment the creamy coconut milk.

4. Pasta

Penne pasta with meatballs, black olives and puttanesca sauce

All teens are likely to have a favourite pasta dish, which will end up being their easy go-to option after flying the nest. Help them to expand their pasta repertoire with our fail-safe recipes, including punchy meatball bake, pesto pasta, spaghetti bolognese, green spaghetti & meatballs and a cheesy pasta bake. Once they’ve mastered a rich ragu sauce, they’ll be able to take on anything!

5. Bowl food

Chicken and vegetables with rice in a bowl

There’s nothing more satisfying then preparing a beautiful bowl of food to scoop with your spoon. Whether your kids want to compile a colourful lunch or energising breakfast bowl, painting the ranbow will ensure they’re packing in a range of fruit and veg while honing their culinary creativity.

Healthy Diet for Adolescents (Ages 12-18)

The teen years are a time to grow and change. The foods that teens eat need to support this process. Here are some ways to help your teen eat healthier.

Key Parts of Healthy Eating

Get Enough Calories

Teens need a lot of calories to support their growth and to fuel their bodies. The amount that your teen needs depends on age, sex, and the calories that he or she burns through activity. Most teen girls need about 2,200 calories each day. Teen boys need 2,500 to 3,000 calories each day.

It is easy to eat too many calories by making poor food choices. This can lead to being overweight or obese. Make sure your teen gets the amount of calories they need by:

  • Giving them healthful foods from all food groups
  • Not giving them foods that are high in sugar or fat, such as candy bars, chips, cakes, cookies, donuts, and sugary drinks
  • Giving your teen just enough food and then letting your teen have more if they are still hungry (serving too much food at one time can lead to overeating)

Key Nutrients

Your teen needs:

  • Carbohydrates (carbs): This is your teen’s main source of energy. About half of their calories should come from carbs. Your teen should choose healthy carbs like whole grains, fruits, veggies, and milk.
  • Protein: Your teen needs protein to grow and build muscle. About a quarter of your teen’s calories should come from protein. Good sources are poultry, lean meat, seafood, eggs, nuts, soy, legumes, and low-fat and nonfat dairy products.
  • Fat: Teens need about a quarter of their calories as fat. It helps with growth. Fat also helps the body take in vitamins and keep the skin healthy. Your teen should eat healthy fats, such as those found in vegetable oils, nuts, avocados, olives, and fatty fish.

Vitamins and Minerals

Many teens, mainly girls, do not get enough vitamins and minerals. Ask the doctor if your teen should take vitamins.

Here are some vitamins and minerals that teens often do not get enough of:

Vitamin or MineralRoleGood Sources
CalciumHelps to build strong bones and teethMilk, cheese, yogurt, tofu, orange juice with calcium, cereal with calcium, and canned salmon
FolateHelps with growthOrange juice, breakfast cereals with folate, bread, milk, dried beans, and lentils
IronNeeded to carry red blood cells; not getting enough from the foods you eat can lead to iron-deficiency anemiaMeat, chicken, fish, and breakfast cereal with iron
ZincHelps with growth and sexual maturationChicken, meat, shellfish, whole grains, and breakfast cereal with zinc
Vitamin ANeeded for eyesight and growth and to help the immune system workCarrots, breakfast cereal with vitamin A, milk, and cheese
Vitamin DNeeded for the body to use the calcium that your teen eatsMilk with vitamin D, salmon, and egg yolks—the sun lets your body make vitamin D, but be aware of the dangers of getting too much sun
Vitamin EHelps protect the body from harmNuts, seeds, whole grains, spinach, and breakfast cereal with vitamin E
MagnesiumHelps keep the heart in rhythm, builds strong bones, and keeps blood pressure within a normal rangeWhole grains, green veggies, and legumes

Fiber

Foods with fiber may put off heart disease and some kinds of cancer. It can also ease constipation and help your teen feel full after eating. Most teens do not eat enough. Teach your teen to choose whole grains and offer them plenty of fruits and veggies.

Eating Plan

This eating plan is based on the United States Department of Agriculture’s Choose My Plate website. The daily amount varies based on age, weight, sex, and activity. Use these amounts as a start. Go to their website to learn more.

Food GroupDaily AmountTips
Grains (1 ounce = 1 slice bread; ¼ bagel; ½ cup cooked pasta or rice; 5 whole wheat crackers)Female12 to 18 years old: 6 ouncesMale12 years old: 7 ounces15 years old: 9 ounces18 years old: 10 ouncesAt least ½ of grains should be whole grainsWhole grains are whole wheat products, oatmeal, brown rice, barley, popcorn
Veggies (1 cup = 1 cup raw or cooked veggies; 2 cups raw leafy veggies)Female12 to 18 years old: 2.5 cupsMale12 years old: 3 cups15 years old: 3.5 cups18 years old: 3.5 cupsOffer many types of veggiesGive your child more:Dark green (broccoli, spinach, romaine lettuce)Orange (carrots, sweet potatoes, butternut squash)Dry beans and peas (chickpeas, black beans, lentils, split peas, kidney beans, tofu)
Fruits (1 cup = 1 cup fresh fruit; 1 cup fruit juice; ½ cup dried fruit)Female12 to 18 years old: 2 cupsMale12 years old: 2 cups15 years old: 2 cups18 years old: 2.5 cupsOffer a variety of fruit and 100% fruit juice
Milk (1 cup = 8 ounces milk or yogurt; 1½ ounces cheese)Female12 to 18 years old: 3 cupsMale12 years old: 3 cups15 years old: 3 cups18 years old: 3 cupsChoose low-fat or fat-free dairy products such as milk, yogurt, and cheeseFoods and drinks with calcium added to them
Protein (1 ounce = 1 ounce meat, fish, or poultry; ¼ cup cooked, dry beans; 1 egg; 1 tablespoon peanut butter; ½ ounce nuts)Female12 to 18 years old: 5.5 ouncesMale12 years old: 6 ounces15 years old: 6.5 ounces18 years old: 7 ouncesChoose lean meats and poultryOffer more fish and vegetarian sources of protein, such as beans, peas, nuts, and seeds
Fats and SweetsFemale12 to 18 years old: 265 caloriesMale12 years old: 290 calories15 years old: 410 calories18 years old: 425 caloriesLimit foods high in added sugar or solid fats like soda, candy, cookies, muffins, chips, French fries, and fried foodsLook for items that do not have saturated or trans fats

*The daily amounts are for children 12 to 18 who are of average weight and height for their age and do 30 to 60 minutes

What Does a Teenage Girl Need in Her Diet?

The best way to make sure a teen girl is getting all the nutrients and the right foods she needs in her diet is to focus on variety and balance between all the different food groups. Each food group provides different vitamins and minerals that are important for normal growth and function. Here’s an example of how much and what to eat from each food group:

  • Dairy– Eat 3 servings per day. One serving equals 1 cup of milk/yogurt, 1/3 cup shredded cheese, 1 1/2 ounces hard cheese, or 2 cups cottage cheese etc.
  • Grains– Eat 6 servings per day. One serving equals 1 slice bread, 1/2 cup cooked grains (oatmeal, rice, pasta), 5-7 crackers, 3 cups popcorn, or 1 cup breakfast cereal. Choose mostly whole wheat grains instead of white.
  • Fruits– Eat 1 1/2 cups per day. 1 medium fruit is equal to about 1 cup. 1/2 cup of dried fruit and 1 cup 100% juice are also equal to a 1 cup serving.
  • Vegetables– Eat 2 1/2 cups per day. 1 cup of whole, sliced, etc. 2 cups of lettuce/leafy greens or 1/2 cup of cooked vegetables is equal to a 1 cup serving size.
  • Protein Foods – Eat about 5-6 servings per day. A serving is 1 ounce of cooked meat/poultry/seafood/lunchmeat, 1 egg, 1/2 ounce of nuts/seeds, 1 Tablespoon nut butter, 1/4 cup cooked beans/lentils/tofu, or 2 Tablespoons of hummus.

Focusing meals on vegetables, fruit, lean protein, and whole grains is a great way to stay healthy and get a balance of food for a healthy body.

How Much Should A Teenage Girl Eat in a Day?

Teenage females should eat enough in the day to fuel their body for all their daily activities including thinking, moving, breathing, chores, focusing in school, sports practice, walking to class, even growing, etc.

There’s a lot going on and adolescent girls need a lot of calories to supply the right amount of energy each day. Most moderately active teenage girls need around 2,000 calories per day of food to provide the right amount of fuel for their body functions, growth, and movement.

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