Diet Plan For High Cholesterol And Diabetes

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Diet plan for high cholesterol and diabetes has always been in the very first place when treating high cholesterol, they can lower the bad cholesterol and raise health levels. When your cholesterol level is high, you need to find a way to reduce it. When it’s not too high, a diet plan isn’t necessary.

Tips for Getting Started With a Diabetes Diet

Rather than trying a complete overhaul all at once, create lasting good habits by focusing on small, simple, and maintainable changes, Palinski-Wade says. Otherwise, you may feel overwhelmed and revert to any previous unhealthy eating habits. “Being consistent with change, no matter how small, is the key to long-term weight loss success,” she adds.

Here are some of the basic rules for building — and then sticking with — a diabetes meal plan.

Consult the experts. Connect with your primary doctor and a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) who is also a certified diabetes care and education specialist (CDCES) — search for one near you at EatRight.org — to figure out how many carbohydrates you should eat per meal based on your individual needs as well as the optimal eating approach for your preferences and health goals.

Veg out. Add in one extra serving of nonstarchy vegetables at dinner. Consider adding vegetables to snacktime, too.

Sweeten things up with fruit. To satisfy your sweet tooth, opt for fruit in moderation. Previous research shows that eating berries, apples, and pears is associated with weight loss.

Diabetes-friendly fruits tend to be especially fiber-rich choices. All other fruits count, too — just be sure to factor them into your carbohydrate servings.

Beware of sauces and dressings. Sugar hides in many condiments, like ketchup, barbecue sauce, and marinades. Always read the label, and choose the lower-sugar option that best fits your diet and goals.

Don’t skip breakfast. Breakfast is one habit of long-term weight-losers.

 Plain yogurt with fruit; nuts and fruit; or scrambled eggs and whole-grain toast are all diabetes-friendly breakfasts that will set up your daily blood sugar management for success.

Simplify beverages. Instead of reaching for sweetened drinks, opt for water (sparkling without added sugar also counts!), unsweetened tea, and coffee.

Cut back on salt. Aim for less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium per day (and less than 1,500 mg daily if you have heart disease) as a way to help manage blood pressure and heart disease risk — a common diabetes complication.

 Try seasoning foods with dried herbs and spices instead. They’re sodium- and calorie-free!

Don’t fear grains. They’re a great source of heart-healthy fiber. Aim to make at least half of your grain intake whole grains when you’re managing type 2 diabetes.

 Diabetes-friendly options include brown rice, quinoa, 100 percent whole-wheat bread, whole-grain pasta, barley, and whole farro.

Add fiber to your diet. Fiber isn’t digested by the human body, so fiber-rich foods with carbohydrates do not raise blood sugar levels as quickly because they are processed more slowly. Fiber-rich foods can also help you feel fuller for longer, possibly aiding weight loss.

 Unfortunately, most adults don’t eat enough fiber.

 Regardless of diabetes status, women should get at least 25 g of fiber per day, while men need at least 38 g per day, Palinski-Wade says.

Choose dairy mindfully. Opt for nonfat or low-fat (1 percent) with milk, cottage cheese, and plain yogurt. Also, remember that while these sources offer protein, they are also another source of carbs, so you need to factor them into your carb allotment. Unsweetened nondairy milk, such as soy and almond milk, are also diabetes-friendly.

What Causes High Cholesterol?

You can blame a mix of genetics, diet and lifestyle for your high cholesterol. When we talk about lowering your cholesterol, we are referring to LDL cholesterol, which is often referred to as “bad cholesterol.” This type of cholesterol is responsible for the artery-clogging plaque that increases risk of stroke and heart attack. HDL, or “good cholesterol,” takes circulating fat to your liver to be processed, so it’s less likely to build up in your arteries. Although genetics can play a role in your LDL numbers, it’s important to look at factors that you have the ability to control. Higher body weight, lack of exercise, smoking and nutrition

What Are Some High Cholesterol Symptoms?

Unfortunately, high cholesterol is a silent disease, which means it has no symptoms. The only way to know if you have high cholesterol is to get a blood test from a medical provider. The side effects of high cholesterol can be serious because it builds up in our arteries as plaque, which limits blood flow to vital organs. High cholesterol can lead to chest pain, stroke or heart attack if untreated.

High Cholesterol Diet Guidelines

High cholesterol levels are often treated with a combination of prescription medication and diet and lifestyle changes. These healthy eating tips can help to lower your cholesterol to a safe level with or without the use of medication, depending on your individual needs. When you combine these basic high-cholesterol diet guidelines with other healthy lifestyle habits, like exercising daily, not smoking and drinking less alcohol, you’ll see your health improve and cholesterol levels return to a healthy range even faster.

Be selective with your fats

Though it sounds backward, foods high in dietary cholesterol (such as shrimp and eggs) don’t actually seem to raise our body’s cholesterol levels. To lower your cholesterol, limit foods with saturated fats (like red meat, processed meats such as hot dogs and sausage, and cheese and other high-fat dairy items) and instead, go for leaner white meat (like chicken and turkey) and plant-based protein options (like tofu and beans), and switch over to low-fat dairy products. Additionally, you’ll want to include more heart-healthy fats from foods like salmon, avocados, olive oil, nuts and seeds, which help to improve cholesterol levels.

A step that can have an even larger impact on lowering cholesterol levels is eliminating foods made with hydrogenated fats and partially hydrogenated fats (also known as trans fats), which are highly processed fats (commonly found in shelf-stable baked foods and processed peanut butter) that are associated with increased risk for heart disease, type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. The FDA has banned food manufacturers from adding trans fats as of January 2020, but still check ingredient lists and avoid products with hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fats listed.

Up your fiber intake

Increasing your fiber intake can help lower your cholesterol. We do this for you in the meal plan below-every day of the plan contains about 30 grams of fiber, which is the recommended daily amount. Most of us know that fiber plays an important role in keeping our digestive systems moving along, but it can also lower cholesterol by binding to the fat in our gut, which prevents our body from absorbing it. Good sources of fiber are fruits and vegetables, whole grains (like oatmeal and brown rice), as well as beans and lentils.

Eat more whole foods

By eating more whole foods, like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans and lentils, nuts and seeds and other healthy fats, there will be less room for the not-as-healthy foods that can increase cholesterol levels or contribute to other heart-related issues. Foods (ad drinks) containing excess sodium and added sugars can lead to high blood pressure and weight gain, both of which are precursors to heart disease. If your diet largely consists of healthy whole foods, then those times when you’re really craving a juicy steak or that doughnut will have less of an impact.

7-Day Diabetes-Friendly Meal Plan for High Cholesterol

Day 1

rainbow frittata

Breakfast (314 calories, 33g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Rainbow Frittata
  • 1 medium apple, sliced

A.M. Snack (206 calories, 7g carbohydrate)

  • ¼ cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds

Lunch (330 calories, 47g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving White Bean & Avocado Toast
  • 1 cup low-fat plain kefir

P.M. Snack (132 calories, 13g carbohydrate)

  • ¾ cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt
  • ½ cup raspberries

Dinner (512 calories, 24g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Pesto Salmon
  • 1-oz. slice whole-wheat baguette

Daily Totals: 1,503 calories, 98g protein, 76g fat, 13g saturated fat, 124g carbohydrate, 30g fiber, 1,465mg sodium

To make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to 1 medium peach, omit yogurt at P.M. snack and omit baguette at dinner.

To make it 2,000 calories: Add 2 Tbsp. natural peanut butter to the apple at breakfast, add 1 plum to A.M. snack and add 1 serving Guacamole Chopped Salad to dinner.

Day 2

Chicken Satay Bowls with Spicy Peanut Sauce

Breakfast (298 calories, 36g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving 3-Ingredient Overnight Berry Muesli
  • 1 hard-boiled egg

A.M. Snack (258 calories, 18g carbohydrate)

  • 1 cup blackberries
  • 15 dried walnut halves

Lunch (407 calories, 28g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Chicken Satay Bowls with Spicy Peanut Sauce
  • 1 medium peach

P.M. Snack (95 calories, 25g carbohydrate)

  • 1 medium apple

Dinner (448 calories, 37g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Sheet-Pan Chicken Fajitas
  • ¼ cup guacamole

Daily Totals: 1,506 calories, 83g protein, 75g fat, 12g saturated fat, 144g carbohydrate, 36g fiber, 1,319mg sodium

To make it 1,200 calories: Omit walnuts at A.M. snack and omit guacamole at dinner.

To make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 serving Strawberry-Pineapple Smoothie to breakfast and add 2 Tbsp. natural peanut butter to P.M. snack.

Day 3

Cajun-Spiced Tofu Tostadas with Beet Crema

Breakfast (293 calories, 21g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Apple & Peanut Butter Toast

A.M. Snack (206 calories, 7g carbohydrate)

  • ¼ cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds

Lunch (407 calories, 28g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Chicken Satay Bowls with Spicy Peanut Sauce
  • 1 medium peach

P.M. Snack (179 calories, 14g carbohydrate)

  • ¾ cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt
  • ½ cup raspberries
  • 1 Tbsp. chopped walnuts

Dinner (432 calories, 41g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Cajun-Spiced Tofu Tostadas with Beet Crema

Daily Totals: 1,518 calories, 82g protein, 86g fat, 12g saturated fat, 113g carbohydrate, 29g fiber, 1,282mg sodium

To make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to 1 plum and omit yogurt and chopped walnuts at P.M. snack.

To make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 cup low-fat plain kefir to breakfast, add 1 large pear to A.M. snack and add 1 serving Guacamole Chopped Salad to dinner.

Day 4

3-ingredient overnight berry muesli

CREDIT: CAROLYN HODGES

Breakfast (298 calories, 36g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving 3-Ingredient Overnight Berry Muesli
  • 1 hard-boiled egg

A.M. Snack (324 calories, 19g carbohydrate)

  • 20 dried walnut halves
  • 1 cup blackberries

Lunch (407 calories, 28g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Chicken Satay Bowls with Spicy Peanut Sauce
  • 1 medium peach

P.M. Snack (32 calories, 7g carbohydrate)

  • ½ cup raspberries

Dinner (439 calories, 35g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Blackened Chicken with Chopped Salad
  • 2-oz. slice whole-wheat baguette

Daily Totals: 1,500 calories, 87g protein, 78g fat, 13g saturated fat, 125g carbohydrate, 30g fiber, 1,475mg sodium

To make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to 1 plum.

To make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 serving Strawberry-Pineapple Smoothie to breakfast and add 30 unsalted dry-roasted almonds to P.M. snack.

Day 5

Chicken Caesar Pasta Salad

Breakfast (293 calories, 21g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Apple & Peanut Butter Toast

A.M. Snack (64 calories, 15g carbohydrate)

  • 1 cup raspberries

Lunch (407 calories, 28g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Chicken Satay Bowls with Spicy Peanut Sauce
  • 1 medium peach

P.M. Snack (237 calories, 15g carbohydrate)

  • ¼ cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds
  • 1 plum

Dinner (498 calories, 37g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Chicken Caesar Pasta Salad
  • 1 serving Basic Green Salad with Vinaigrette

Meal-Prep Tip: Reserve two servings of Chicken Caesar Pasta Salad to have for lunch on Days 6 and 7.

Daily Totals: 1,499 calories, 84g protein, 81g fat, 12g saturated fat, 116g carbohydrate, 31g fiber, 1,487mg sodium

To make it 1,200 calories: Omit almonds at P.M. snack and omit Basic Green Salad with Vinaigrette at dinner.

To make it 2,000 calories: Add 15 dried walnut halves to A.M. snack and add 1 avocado, sliced, to the salad at dinner.

Day 6

One-Pot Garlicky Shrimp & Broccoli

CREDIT: PHOTOGRAPHY / KELSEY HANSEN, STYLING / GREG LUNA

Breakfast (298 calories, 36g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving 3-Ingredient Overnight Berry Muesli
  • 1 hard-boiled egg

A.M. Snack (110 calories, 12g carbohydrate)

  • 1 cup low-fat plain kefir

Lunch (383 calories, 34g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Chicken Caesar Pasta Salad

P.M. Snack (268 calories, 21g carbohydrate)

  • 1 cup blackberries
  • ¼ cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds

Dinner (448 calories, 46g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving One-Pot Garlicky Shrimp & Broccoli
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa

Daily Totals: 1,506 calories, 102g protein, 63g fat, 13g saturated fat, 148g carbohydrate, 29g fiber, 1,275mg sodium

To make it 1,200 calories: Omit almonds at P.M. snack and reduce to 1/2 cup cooked quinoa at dinner.

To make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 serving Strawberry-Pineapple Smoothie to breakfast and add 18 dried walnut halves to A.M. snack.

Day 7

Vegetarian Chopped Power Salad with Creamy Cilantro Dressing

CREDIT: BRIE PASSANO

Breakfast (314 calories, 33g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Rainbow Frittata
  • 1 medium apple, sliced

A.M. Snack (266 calories, 12g carbohydrate)

  • 18 dried walnut halves
  • 1 plum

Lunch (383 calories, 34g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Chicken Caesar Pasta Salad

P.M. Snack (124 calories, 13g carbohydrate)

  • ¾ cup blackberries
  • 10 unsalted dry-roasted almonds

Dinner (428 calories, 51g carbohydrate)

  • 1 serving Vegetarian Chopped Power Salad with Creamy Cilantro Dressing
  • 1-oz. slice whole-wheat baguette

Daily Totals: 1,514 calories, 73g protein, 77g fat, 13g saturated fat, 143g carbohydrate, 31g fiber, 1,345mg sodium

To make it 1,200 calories: Omit walnuts at A.M. snack and omit baguette at dinner.

To make it 2,000 calories: Add 2 Tbsp. natural peanut butter to the apple at breakfast, add 1 medium peach to lunch and increase to 1/3 cup almonds at P.M. snack.

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