Diet Plan For Truck Drivers

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Diet plan for truck drivers is about more than losing weight. It’s about following a healthy food plan to keep your body operating at peak performance on the road and improve your health when you’re not.

What’s the Best Diet for Truck Drivers?

While some drivers over-eat regularly, the majority do not – including most overweight and obese drivers. 
 -  Creative Commons
While some drivers over-eat regularly, the majority do not – including most overweight and obese drivers.Creative Commons

When I started researching the truck driver lifestyle, I was shocked to find out that while some drivers over-eat regularly, the majority do not – including most overweight and obese drivers. In fact, most drivers have a calorie deficit compared to their resting metabolic rate. Yet many drivers, despite eating fewer calories, continue to gain weight and worsen health risk markers such as blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose.

Healthy weight loss is more complicated than calories in vs. calories out. Aside from the facts that proteins, carbohydrates and fats all have different thermal effects, requiring different energy to break them down, and that processed foods often have a significantly lower thermal effect than the same meal as a whole food, there are two main reasons drivers struggle with health and weight:

First: Long-term caloric deficits (dieting) cause our metabolism to slow down and the body to store more fat. While most people experience initial weight loss when reducing calories, if it is continued over time, the body soon will plateau and begin storing additional fat.

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Second: The hormone response to foods can impact health and weight more than any other factor. In particular, I’m talking about the insulin response to consuming too many carbohydrates, especially starchy carbohydrates, or too many foods high in sugars. Over time, continuous spikes of insulin lead to insulin resistance and eventually metabolic syndrome, which consists of weight gain and obesity, elevated cholesterol, and hypertension.

As we see drivers eating just once or twice per day, while eating the wrong types of foods, it is easy to see the problem. A driver who consumes just 1,500 calories, but lives off of coffee and caffeinated soda or energy drinks, snacks on sugary treats, then finishes the day by eating a large 1,000-calorie meal of pasta, fries, bread, and a little dessert, has a slower metabolism and produces far more insulin than a driver who consumes 2,200 calories made up of four separate 550-calorie meals/snacks that are filled with healthy fats, lean protein, and modest amounts of carbohydrates.

If the calories in vs. calories out theory was correct, the first driver should be losing weight due to a calorie deficit, and driver two should probably gain a little weight with a calorie surplus. But in reality, driver one puts on 15 to 40 pounds each year, while driver two maintains his or her weight or loses a few pounds each year.

Here are four simple steps drivers can take:

Eat three to four times each day – two meals and two snacks, or two meals and one snack. This helps keep the metabolism active and helps regulate blood sugars (minimizing insulin). Drivers can prep meals and snacks for several days in advance that are easy to make and ready to eat. Meals such as rice and beans, or microwavable meals without preservatives, are great. Snacks such as celery or apples with peanut butter, or a cup of mixed nuts, or fresh carrots are also great options.

Minimize refined carbohydrates from breads, pasta, cookies, and sweet drinks (even diet drinks), and avoid starchy foods like potatoes and white rice. Instead, carbohydrates should come from vegetables, legumes and whole grains. Refined carbohydrates have little to no fiber and turn into sugars in the blood stream quickly, causing spikes in insulin.

Eat fully plant-based at least four days per week. Drivers can ease into it by starting with one to two days, but it’s easier than most people think. We’ve had hundreds of drivers do this, and every one of them feels better than ever. Eating a plant-based diet has been shown to lower inflammation, cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood glucose. A simple plant-based day could consist of a bowl of real oatmeal for breakfast; soup or a veggie wrap for lunch; fresh veggies and a handful of nuts for snacks; and three-bean chili for dinner.

Avoid high-animal-protein, low-carb diets such as the Atkins Diet and Paleo diet. While there is initial rapid weight loss, too much animal protein causes a variety of complications, including inflammation and oxidative stress (even gout), and is connected to higher mortality rates, meaning more illness and death.

Truck drivers who follow these tips can improve their diets, their health, and their energy.

Top Healthy Diets for Truck Drivers

Top Healthy Diets for Truck Drivers

Truck drivers face strict regulations limiting the number of hours they work in a day. Consequently, many focus on delivering the shipments on time that they forget about their health. The nature of the job is also not forgiving, because being behind the wheel means living a sedentary lifestyle. Diets for truck drivers can suffer.

At Knight Transportation, we understand these challenges, and that’s why we advocate that our drivers follow healthy diets to improve their health and avoid the financial burden associated with ill health.

Below are top healthy truck driver meals that will help you as a truck driver avoid gaining excess weight, prevent diet-related diseases, lower your healthcare costs, and avoid challenges in old age.

Healthy Truck Driver Diet  

#1: Lean Meat

Meat is a popular truck driver meal throughout the country, but you should know that not all types of meats are healthy. For example, hamburgers and fried meats contain a higher fat content and more calories, which is not recommended for your body. However, it is recommended to eat lean meat (poultry and fish) that has been either boiled or baked.

#2: Fresh Fruits

Truck drivers who habitually snack on fresh fruits and vegetables tend to have a stronger immune system and sustained energy throughout the day. Citrus fruits such as oranges and lemons contain high levels of vitamin C that keep you healthy and act as an antioxidant. They also contain natural sugars and high water content that keeps you energized and feeling full, without all of the calories.

#3: Fiber-Rich Foods

There is a wide variety of fiber-rich foods out there that you can add to your diet. They include raw nuts, brown rice, beans, whole grain bread, and fresh fruits and vegetables. You can enjoy as many fresh salads as you need, while over the road, just remember to avoid salad dressings with high sugar and fat – opt for a vinaigrette or balsamic dressings with olive oil. With foods like these that contain high fiber, you will feel fuller longer and it will prevent you from overeating.

#4: Healthy Snacks

Here are some good snack ideas that you can find at some truck stops. Below are a few of them:

  • Apples and peanut butter – a childhood treat that we know and love. Protein, healthy fats and sustained energy.
  • Yogurt – contains vitamin B-12 that help with mental clarity and depression and probiotics which help with gut bacteria to have a stronger immune system.
  • Trail mix – is made up of dried fruits, granola, and nuts. Others may contain pumpkin and sunflower seeds. All these contain potassium and vitamin C, which are good for heart health.
  • Hard-boiled eggs – a rich source of protein; a single egg can yield 70 calories of energy and 6 grams of protein.
  • Popcorn– contains antioxidants called polyphenols that can help your body fight osteoporosis, cancer, and diabetes. However, avoid toppings and opt for the plain or lightly salted options.
  • Tuna Pouch – high in Omega-3 fatty acids, it will protect your body from coronary diseases while providing a great source of protein.

 #5: Water

Lastly, water is one of the most crucial aspects of your diet – don’t forget this. This will help you with sustained energy, digestion, and overall health. Drinking more water will make you feel full and thus avoid overeating.

Truck Drivers Diet Plan

Truck Drivers should be concerned about health and fitness. While taking weeks or even month-long trips, there are lifestyle changes that truck drivers need to follow in order to stay fit. It’s important for truck drivers to ask themselves “How do I stay healthy on the roads. For some drivers, maintaining a healthy lifestyle can be challenging because they may not have the resources that people in other professions have, but that’s not to say that living a healthy life as a truck driver isn’t possible.

Consequently, many focus on delivering the shipments on time that they forget about their health. The nature of the job is also not forgiving, because being behind the wheel means living a sedentary lifestyle. In this article, we have come up to you with the Top 9 Healthiest Food/Meal for Truck Drivers which will fulfill your daily need for Protein, Iron, Calcium, Multivitamin, and Multi-mineral. Let us find out Who Sells the Most Pick up Trucks in the US?

Truck Drivers Diet Plan: Top 9 Healthiest Food/Meal for Truck Drivers?
Truck Drivers Diet Plan: Top 9 Healthiest Food/Meal for Truck Drivers?

9 Healthiest Food/Meal for Truck Drivers:

1. Have Breakfast Everyday

2. Meat

3. Fresh Fruits

4. Fiber-Rich Foods

5. Eat More Salad and Leafy Greens:

6. Healthy Snacks

7. Drink Enough Water to Stay Hydrated

8. Perfect Dinner Preparation

9. Desserts for Truck Drivers

1. Have Breakfast Everyday:

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, for anyone whether you’re a professional truck driver or not. According to a study done by consumer reports, people who eat breakfast regularly tend to have better diets overall, consuming more fruit, vegetables, milk, and whole grains. Eating breakfast increases your blood sugar which gives you the energy to start your day. It also prolongs your need to eat lunch and keeps you moving throughout the day, which is important for truck drivers taking long trips.

2. Meat

Meat is a popular truck driver meal throughout the country, but you should know that not all types of meats are healthy. For example, hamburgers and fried meats contain a higher fat content and more calories, which is not recommended for your body. However, it is recommended to eat lean meat (poultry and fish) that has been either boiled or baked.

3. Fresh Fruits

Truck drivers who habitually snack on fresh fruits and vegetables tend to have a stronger immune system and sustained energy throughout the day. Citrus fruits such as oranges and lemons contain high levels of vitamin C that keep you healthy and act as an antioxidant. They also contain natural sugars and high water content that keeps you energized and feeling full, without all of the calories.

4. Fiber-Rich Foods

There is a wide variety of fiber-rich foods out there that you can add to your diet. They include raw nuts, brown rice, beans, whole grain bread, and fresh fruits and vegetables. You can enjoy as many fresh salads as you need, while over the road, just remember to avoid salad dressings with high sugar and fat – opt for a vinaigrette or balsamic dressings with olive oil. With foods like these that contain high fiber, you will feel fuller longer and it will prevent you from overeating.

5. Eat More Salad and Leafy Greens:

Eating leafy greens two times per day will increase your focus on the road. Leafy greens are a good source of Vitamin K which prevents certain age-related conditions. They also help lower cholesterol and preserve your vision. For Example

  • Broccoli salad: broccoli is rich in minerals, nutrients, and fiber
  • Cucumber salad: low in calories and high in nutrients

6. Healthy Snacks

Here are some good snack ideas that you can find at some truck stops. Below are a few of them:

  • Apples and peanut butter A childhood treat that we know and love. Protein, healthy fats, and sustained energy.
  • Yogurt: contains vitamin B-12 that helps with mental clarity and depression and probiotics which help with good bacteria to have a stronger immune system.
  • Dry Fruits: is made up of dried fruits, granola, and nuts. Others may contain pumpkin and sunflower seeds. All these contain potassium and vitamin C, which are good for heart health.
  • Hard-boiled eggs: A rich source of protein; a single egg can yield 70 calories of energy and 6 grams of protein.
  • Popcorn: contains antioxidants called polyphenols that can help your body fight osteoporosis, cancer, and diabetes. However, avoid toppings and opt for plain or lightly salted options.
  • Tuna Pouch: High in Omega-3 fatty acids, it will protect your body from coronary diseases while providing a great source of protein.

7. Drink Enough Water to Stay Hydrated:

Lastly, water is one of the most crucial aspects of your diet – don’t forget this. This will help you with sustained energy, digestion, and overall health. Drinking more water will make you feel full and thus avoid overeating.

8. Perfect Dinner Preparation:

After a long day on the road, dinner time is often a warm welcome reprieve. And just because these dinner options are healthy doesn’t mean they don’t taste good. Consider the following dinnertime delights.

  • Quinoa and veggies are perfect dinners that can be easily prepared before your trip and stored in your cooler or refrigerator.
  • Chicken salad sandwiches are delicious, nutritious, and can easily be eaten while on the road.
  • Protein quesadillas are a great dinner option, especially when you’re craving salty, cheesy goodness.
  • Tortillas are a good low-calorie alternative to other kinds of bread, and by adding meats, veggies, and cheese, you’ll get all the nutrients you need.
  • Stir fry made with low-sodium soy sauce is a great way to spice up your diet while also staying healthy.
  • Barbecue beef sandwiches made with pita bread and low-sugar sauces can provide you with a hearty, delicious dinner that satisfies your hunger.
  • Chili and other meat-and-veggie soups can easily be made in your truck or made prior to your trip, stored in your truck, and defrosted when the craving hits.
  • Turkey wraps and pita bread sandwiches make just as good dinners as they do lunches. They’re easy to make and healthy to eat.
  • Sushi wraps are packed with rice, fish, and veggies that make them a great alternative to greasy cheeseburgers.

9. Desserts for Truck Drivers

All of us need a little sweetness in our lives now and then. For truck drivers, it is possible to scrumptiously satisfy your sweet tooth without indulging in a calorie fest. If you have a freezer–and a sweet tooth–check out these healthy dessert treats that get our vote (with a cherry on top!)

  • Fat-free ice cream or sorbet
  • Frozen grapes or strawberries
  • Frozen yogurt
  • Frozen fruit bars/ice pops

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