Diet Plan For Weight Gain Vegetarian

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Diet plan for weight gain vegetarian is a healthy diet program that ensures proper supply of all the necessary nutrients to your body. Diet plays an important role in building muscles. The balanced and well planned diet plan for weight gain vegetarian will definitely help you not only in gaining weight but also in gaining lean muscles along with fats free body. Vegetarianism is actually very good because it is a generally healthier way to live. However, there is an additional challenge if one wants to gain weight.

A healthy, balanced vegan diet can be a great way to gain weight if that is your aim. It is full of healthy foods that are rich in good fats, protein, and carbohydrates which can all be used to meet those weight-gain goals.

WHY DO YOU NEED TO GAIN WEIGHT?

There could be any number of reasons, including recovering from a recent spell of ill-health to building muscle mass, usually to improve physique or performance in a sport. The vegan diet has been adopted by many top athletes and found to be optimal for this purpose. If you need convincing, we feel sure that watching The Game Changers movie will be enough to make anyone reach for the black beans instead of the beef for their post workout meal.

If you have experienced unexpected weight loss, we recommend seeing a medial practitioner who can get to the root cause. But for those wishing to gain weight healthily and sustainably on a vegan diet, we can help!

WHAT IS A VEGAN DIET?

A vegan diet is a part of the vegan philosophy that seeks to exclude the use of all foods taken from animals to avoid contributing to their exploitation and harm. So, when it comes to diet, this means no meat, fish, eggs, or dairy but that still leaves us with a bounty of fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, grains and all the products made from them.

This healthy selection is often seen as a negative for gaining weight, as people may prioritize protein-dense foods like meat and dairy, but there are protein-dense vegan foods, too, and they come without the unhealthy fats and other negative health outcomes associated with products taken from animals. Plus, choosing plant foods means we get plenty of other key nutrients like fiber, vitamin c and more.

In short, the vegan diet can provide plenty of protein and healthy fats for healthy weight gain, whilst also nourishing other aspects of your health.

WHY CAN’T SOME VEGANS GAIN WEIGHT?

Negative caloric deficit is the most common reason for difficulty gaining weight. As many healthy plant-based foods are high in fiber and water content, we may feel full before we have taken in the required calories to gain weight. If our solution is to just eat more of these foods, this can leave us feeling sick, bloated, and still behind on the calories we need.

Fear not, there is a simple solution. The answer is caloric density. This merely means understanding which food groups provide us with the most calories per 100g, and then eating as much of them as we need! Read on for a breakdown of the most calorically dense vegan foods out there.

HOW TO GAIN WEIGHT ON A VEGAN DIET

There is no one-size-fits-all solution. Everybody is different and it’s important to understand our current and expected calorie intake, metabolism, and body type before deciding on how we go about gaining weight. The following tips outline the best ways in which we can maximize our weight gain on a vegan diet.

crossfit vegan health

Know Your Current Calorie Intake, Metabolism, and Body Type

The first step to gaining weight is simply figuring out your current calorie intake. Calorie King provides a free and easy calculator to find out how many calories are in our meals—a good approach is to track the ingredients you eat in a normal week, then calculate a total. Alternatively, there are many calorie tracking apps that will do this for you. Simple!

Then we should calculate our metabolism or Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR). Put simply, this is how many calories we need to sustain ourselves whilst resting.

If we want to gain weight, we want to take in enough calories to account for our BMR, plus the calories we burn during exercise, and then a bit more! This will result in a positive caloric balance and healthy weight gain. Active.com has a simple and easy to use BMR calculator to do the sums for us.

Body type also plays a part in our approach. Our body type is somewhat decided by genes, but is largely adaptable to our diet and exercise choices. The National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) provides an excellent overview of body type and how we can adapt what we have into what we want.

11 High-Calorie Vegan Foods for Healthy Weight Gain

Gaining weight can be incredibly difficult and often involves modifications to both your diet and lifestyle.

Eliminating animal products from your diet makes it even more challenging to put on weight and can require you to make strategic food choices.

That said, there are plenty of nutritious vegan foods that can add the extra calories to your diet needed for weight gain.

Here are 11 high-calorie vegan foods that can help you gain weight.

1. Nuts and Nut Butters

Nuts are a great source of protein, healthy fats and calories, making them an excellent choice if you’re looking to gain weight.

For example, walnuts pack 185 calories and over 4 grams of protein in a single 1-ounce (28-gram) serving (1).

A daily handful or two of nuts like almonds, cashews, walnuts or pecans can add enough calories to your diet to support healthy weight gain.

Nut butters, which are high in calories, are a quick and convenient option as well — though you should opt for natural varieties free from added sugar or oils. Add nut butter to snacks, sides or smoothies for a boost of protein and calories.

SUMMARY

Nuts and nut butters are especially high in calories and protein. They can be enjoyed in a number of ways.

2. Avocado

Avocados are renowned for their creamy texture and delicious, mild flavor.

They also boast an impressive nutrient profile and help promote healthy weight gain by supplying plenty of heart-healthy fats and fiber.

Just one avocado boasts about 322 calories, 13.5 grams of fiber and almost 30 grams of total fat (2).

Avocados are also rich in a range of micronutrients, including vitamin C, folate, pantothenic acid and potassium (2).

Try adding half an avocado to your morning smoothie, spreading one on a slice of sprouted bread or cubing it to sprinkle on salads or omelets.

SUMMARY

Avocados are rich in calories, fiber, vitamins and minerals. They’re also an easy way to boost your intake of healthy fats.

3. Quinoa

Quinoa is a healthy pseudo-grain loaded with protein, fiber and many other nutrients your body needs.

It’s also high in calories, as 1 cup (185 grams) of cooked quinoa holds about 222 calories, 8 grams of protein and 5 grams of fiber (3).

Quinoa is one of the few complete plant-based sources of protein, meaning that it provides all nine essential amino acids. Your body is unable to produce these on its own and must obtain them from food (4).

Quinoa also supplies a good amount of manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, copper and folate (3).

It functions as a satisfying side dish and can be added to soups, stews and salads for an easy way to squeeze in more calories.

SUMMARY

Quinoa is a complete protein, providing all the amino acids your body needs. It also contains a good amount of calories, fiber and micronutrients.

4. Tahini

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Made from toasted and ground sesame seeds, tahini is a staple in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern cuisines that is high in protein, fiber, healthy fats and calories.

Just 1 tablespoon (15 grams) of tahini boasts approximately 89 calories, 2.5 grams of protein, 1.5 grams of fiber and 8 grams of fat (5).

Incorporating a few tablespoons per day into your diet can effectively up your calorie intake and promote healthy weight gain.

Tahini has a paste-like consistency that’s similar to peanut butter.

It makes a great addition to wraps, sandwiches and salads. It can also be made into a flavorful dip, stirred into soups or blended into a creamy dressing and served over steamed veggies.

SUMMARY

Tahini, a paste made from sesame seeds, is high in protein, healthy fats, fiber and calories. It has a creamy consistency and works well as a spread, dip or dressing.

5. Olive Oil

Rich in healthy monounsaturated fats, olive oil is well known for its health-promoting properties.

Monounsaturated fats have been shown to increase levels of “good” HDL cholesterol, reduce blood triglycerides and help improve blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes (6).

Olive oil is also high in antioxidants, which are beneficial compounds that prevent oxidative damage to your cells and reduce your risk of chronic disease (7, 8).

Plus, with 119 calories and 13.5 grams of fat in a single tablespoon (14 grams), olive oil can also be a healthy way to add extra calories to a meal.

Drizzle it over cooked veggies, mix it into a salad dressing or add it to marinades to bring a burst of flavor and calories to your meals.

SUMMARY

Olive oil is high in calories, monounsaturated fats and antioxidants. It can be added to cooked veggie dishes, salad dressings and marinades.

6. Dried Fruit

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Dried fruit is a great way to gain extra calories, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

Exact nutritional content can vary based on the type of fruit, ranging from prunes — which have 209 calories in a half cup (87 grams) — to raisins — which have 247 in a half cup (83 grams) (9, 10).

Studies note that dried fruit is rich in fiber and antioxidants and supplies micronutrients that are 3–5 times more concentrated than in fresh fruit (11, 12).

Because dried fruit is also high in natural sugars, it’s best to combine it with a nutritious protein source to minimize the potential effects on your blood sugar.

Mix your choice of dried fruit with coconut yogurt or oatmeal for a high-calorie breakfast, or try it with nuts and seeds as a tasty trail mix. You can also add it to protein shakes.

SUMMARY

Dried fruit is high in calories, fiber and micronutrients. Consider combining it with a quality protein to cut the impact of its high sugar content.

7. Legumes

Legumes, such as lentils, beans and chickpeas, all pack a good amount of protein, fiber and calories.

Black beans, for example, pack 227 calories and 15 grams each of protein and fiber in 1 cooked cup (172 grams) (13).

Legumes are also generally high in important vitamins and minerals, including folate, magnesium, iron, zinc and potassium (14).

Try adding beans to vegan meatballs or burgers, as well as salads, soups, casseroles, dips and spreads.

SUMMARY

Legumes — which range from lentils to black beans — are high in calories, protein and fiber, as well as many important vitamins and minerals.

8. Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are a popular starchy vegetable favored for their vibrant color, delicious flavor and stellar nutrient profile.

They’re high in calories and fiber, plus a number of essential vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

One cup (200 grams) of cooked sweet potato contains 180 calories and 6.5 grams of fiber (15).

A single serving can also knock out your entire daily needs for vitamin A — and give you ample vitamin C, manganese, potassium and vitamin B6 (15).

Try this orange root vegetable roasted, baked, mashed or grilled.

SUMMARY

Sweet potatoes are high in calories, fiber, vitamins and minerals and can be prepared in many different ways.

9. Smoothies

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Vegan smoothies are a quick and convenient way to get a concentrated dose of calories in a single serving.

If you use a nutritious source of protein like vegan protein powder or soy yogurt, you can maximize the potential health benefits.

Nut butter, dried or fresh fruits, avocados, almond milk, coconut oil and seeds are all excellent add-ins for a nutritious, calorie-dense smoothie.

Drink your smoothie between or after meals instead of as a meal replacement to maximize your calorie consumption and support weight gain.

SUMMARY

Vegan smoothies are an easy way to increase your calorie and nutrient intake. For best results, blend a few high-calorie ingredients with a good source of protein.

10. Rice

Rice is a cost-effective, versatile and calorie-dense carbohydrate that can promote gradual weight gain.

It also provides a bit of extra protein and fiber, in addition to several important vitamins and minerals.

One cup (195 grams) of cooked brown rice gives 216 calories alongside 5 grams of protein and 3.5 grams of fiber (16).

It’s also a good source of manganese, selenium, magnesium, phosphorus and niacin (16).

You can combine rice with a serving of protein for an easy meal on the go.

Rice can also be cooked ahead of time and refrigerated for use for several days. While opinions differ on how long you can safely store rice, recommendations range from a few days to a week.

How to Meal Prep Your Week of Meals:

  1. Meal prep the Lemon-Roasted Vegetable Hummus Bowls and store in meal-prep containers for the work week. (To buy: amazon.com, $30 for 5)
  2. Bake a batch of the Baked Banana-Nut Oatmeal Cups to have throughout the week. Store in air-tight containers to keep fresh (To buy: amazon.com, $20 for 1 large).
  3. Make 3 hard-boiled eggs to have as snacks for the week. (To buy: amazon.com, $12 for 1 medium).

Day 1

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Breakfast (522 calories)

  • 1 cup oatmeal cooked in 2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup raspberries
  • 1 Tbsp. chopped walnuts
  • 1 hard-boiled egg

Top oatmeal with raspberries, walnuts and a pinch of cinnamon.

A.M. Snack (286 calories)

  • 1 medium apple
  • 2 Tbsp. peanut butter

Lunch (450 calories)

  • 1 serving Whole-Wheat Veggie Wrap
  • 1 banana

P.M. Snack (210 calories)

  • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/2 cup sliced strawberries
  • 1 Tbsp. chia seeds

Dinner (509 calories)

  • 1 serving Mushroom-Quinoa Veggie Burgers with Special Sauce
  • 1 serving Basic Green Salad with Vinaigrette

Daily Totals: 1,978 calories, 80 g protein, 241 g carbohydrates, 48 g fiber, 85 g fat, 1,709 mg sodium.

Day 2

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Shopping Tip: When buying a premade muesli, look for one without added sugars, which take away from the healthy goodness of this whole-grain breakfast.

Breakfast (421 calories)

  • 2 servings Baked Banana-Nut Oatmeal Cups
  • 2 clementine

A.M. Snack (216 calories)

  • 1/2 cup raspberries
  • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 Tbsp. chia seeds

Lunch (455 calories)

  • 1 serving Lemon-Roasted Vegetable Hummus Bowls
  • 1 apple

P.M. Snack (201 calories)

  • 1 medium banana
  • 1 Tbsp. peanut butter

Dinner (422 calories)

  • 1 serving Butternut Squash & Black Bean Tostadas
  • 1 serving Basic Green Salad with Vinaigrette

Evening Snack (156 calories)

  • 1 ounce dark chocolate

Daily Totals: 1,985 calories, 72 g protein, 258 g carbohydrates, 52 g fiber, 86 g fat, 1,771 mg sodium.

Day 3

One-Pot Tomato Basil Pasta

Breakfast (271 calories)

  • 2 serving Baked Banana-Nut Oatmeal Cups
  • 1 medium apple

A.M. Snack (158 calories)

  • 1 hard-boiled egg seasoned with a pinch each of salt and pepper
  • 1/4 avocado, sliced
  • 1 slice whole-wheat toast

Spread avocado on toast.

Lunch (465 calories)

  • 1 serving Lemon-Roasted Vegetable Hummus Bowls
  • 1 banana

P.M. Snack (216 calories)

  • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt
  • 1/2 cup raspberries
  • 1 Tbsp. chia seeds

Dinner (479 calories)

  • 1 serving One-Pot Tomato Bail Pasta topped with 2 Tbsp. shredded Parmesan cheese
  • 2″ slice of whole-wheat baguette

Evening Snack (156 calories)

  • 1 ounce dark chocolate

Daily Totals: 1,991 calories, 81 g protein, 273 g carbohydrates, 49 g fiber, 73 g fat, 2,010 mg sodium.

Day 4

stuffed potatoes with salsa

Breakfast (446 calories)

  • 2 serving Baked Banana-Nut Oatmeal Cups
  • 1 medium apple

A.M. Snack (229 calories)

  • 1 hard-boiled egg seasoned with a pinch each of salt and pepper
  • 1/4 avocado, sliced
  • 1 slice of whole-wheat bread

Lunch (465 calories)

  • 1 serving Lemon-Roasted Vegetable Hummus Bowls
  • 1 medium banana

P.M. Snack (253 calories)

  • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt
  • 2 clementines
  • 1 Tbsp. chia seeds

Dinner (520 calories)

  • 1 serving Stuffed Potatoes with Salsa & Beans topped with 2 Tbsp. shredded Cheddar cheese and 1 Tbsp. sour cream
  • 1 serving Basic Green Salad with Vinaigrette

Evening Snack (64 calories)

  • 1 cup raspberries

Daily Totals: 1,977 calories, 77 g protein, 268 g carbohydrates, 58 g fiber, 77 g fat, 1,879 mg sodium.

Day 5

meal prep veggie and quinoa bowls

Breakfast (340 calories)

  • 1 serving Avocado-Egg Toast
  • 2 clementine

A.M. Snack (215 calories)

  • 1/2 cup raspberries
  • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 Tbsp. chia seeds

Lunch (465 calories)

  • 1 serving Lemon-Roasted Vegetable Hummus Bowls
  • 1 banana

P.M. Snack (286 calories)

  • 1 medium apple
  • 2 Tbsp. peanut butter

Dinner (543 calories)

  • 1 serving Vegetarian Tikka Masala
  • 3/4 cup cooked brown rice
  • 1 serving Basic Green Salad with Vinaigrette

Evening Snack (156 calories)

  • 1 ounce dark chocolate

Daily Totals: 2,006 calories, 84 g protein, 231 g carbohydrates, 49 g fiber, 93 g fat, 1,620 mg sodium.

Day 6

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Breakfast (523 calories)

  • 1 cup oatmeal cooked in 2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup raspberries
  • 1 Tbsp. chopped walnuts
  • 1 hard-boiled egg

Top oatmeal with raspberries, walnuts and a pinch of cinnamon.

A.M. Snack (223 calories)

  • 1 cup cucumber slices
  • 1/2 cup hummus

Lunch (450 calories)

  • 1 serving Whole-Wheat Veggie Wrap
  • 1 banana

P.M. Snack (286 calories)

  • 1 medium apple
  • 2 Tbsp. peanut butter

Dinner (475 calories)

  • 1 serving Beefless Vegan Tacos
  • 1 serving Basic Green Salad with Vinaigrette

Evening Snack (32 calories)

  • 1/2 cup raspberries

Daily Totals: 1,988 calories, 71 g protein, 237 g carbohydrates, 53 g fiber, 94 g fat, 2,056 mg sodium.

Day 7

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Breakfast (382 calories)

  • 1/2 cup oatmeal cooked in 1/2 cup skim milk and 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 medium apple, diced
  • 1 Tbsp. chopped walnuts
  • 1 hard-boiled egg

A.M. Snack (286 calories)

  • 1 medium apple
  • 2 Tbsp. peanut butter

Lunch (450 calories)

  • 1 serving Whole-Wheat Veggie Wrap
  • 1 banana

P.M. Snack (229 calories)

  • 1 hard-boiled egg seasoned with a pinch each of salt and pepper
  • 1/4 avocado, sliced
  • 1 slice of whole-wheat bread

Dinner (474 calories)

  • 1 serving Curried Chickpea Stew
  • 1 4″ diameter whole-wheat pita

Evening Snack (156 calories)

  • 1 ounce dark chocolate

Daily Totals: 1,977 calories, 84 g protein, 246 g carbohydrates, 50 g fiber, 81 g fat, 1,913 mg sodium.

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