Diet Plan With Fruits

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Diet plan with fruits is based on eating primarily or exclusively fruits in the botanical sense, that is, all edible fruit. Fruitarianism can be adopted as a healthy lifestyle choice or for spiritual purposes, depending on the perspective adopted. Fruits are great source of our daily diet that help us lead healthier and more active lives. Find out how important fruits are for the body and what these yummy fruits can do for you.

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Diet Plan With Fruits

Enjoy a wide variety of fruit and vegetable types every day. Aim for five servings daily and choose a mixture of colours to ensure a good mix of nutrients.

All fruit and vegetables, including fresh, frozen, canned, dried and pure juices, count towards the five daily servings.

But bear in mind that dried fruit won’t fill you up as much as a whole piece of fruit.

For 100 calories you can eat an apple, a satsuma and seven strawberries (with a total weight of 250g) or around 1tbsp of raisins (with a weight of just 30g)!

Also bear in mind that research shows that liquids tend to be less satiating than food, so you will probably find a whole piece of fruit fills you up more than a glass of fruit juice.

If you want to try losing weight without meat at all, take a look at our vegetarian diet plan

How Much Fruit and Veg Should I Eat?

One portion of fruit or veg is equivalent to around 80g. Below are some examples of what counts as one portion:

  • 1 apple, banana, pear, orange or other similar sized fruit
  • 2 plums, satsumas, kiwi fruit or other similar sized fruit
  • 1/2 a grapefruit or avocado 
  • 1 large slice of melon or fresh pineapple
  • 3 heaped tablespoons of vegetables, beans or pulses
  • 3 heaped tablespoons of fruit salad or stewed fruit
  • 1 heaped tablespoon of raisins or sultanas
  • 3 dried apricots
  • 1 cupful of grapes, cherries or berries
  • 1 dessert bowl of salad
  • 1 small glass (150ml) of pure fruit juice
slices of different fruits

Calories in Fruit

Apples, Eating

Calories in 100g of apples

Calories49.05kcal
Carbohydrate11.83g
Protein0.35g
Fat0.1g
Fibre1.97g

Calories in 1 medium apple (182g): 89.3kcal  

Apricots, Fresh

Calories in 100g of apricots

Calories51.6kcal
Carbohydrate11.96g
Protein1.5g
Fat0.42g
Fibre2.15g

Calories in 1 apricot (37g): 19.1kcal  

Avocado Pear, Flesh Only

Calories in 100g of avocado

Calories190.0kcal
Carbohydrate1.9g
Protein1.9g
Fat19.5g
Fibre3.4g

Calories in 1 medium avocado pear (145g): 275.5kcal 

Banana, Without Skin

Calories in 100g of bananas

Calories95.0kcal
Carbohydrate20.9g
Protein1.2g
Fat0.3g
Fibre4.2g

Calories in a medium banana (100g): 95.3kcal

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Blackberries

Calories in 100g of blackberries

Calories25.25kcal
Carbohydrate5.1g
Protein0.9g
Fat0.2g
Fibre3.1g

Calories in 1 serving of blackberries (28g): 7.1kcal  

Blackcurrants

Calories in 100g of blackcurrants

Calories28kcal
Carbohydrate6.6g
Protein0.9g
Fat0g
Fibre3.6g

Calories in 1 serving of blackcurrants (80g): 22kcal  

Blueberries

Calories in 100g of blueberries

Calories57kcal
Carbohydrate14.49g
Protein0.74g
Fat0.33g
Fibre2.4g

Calories in 1 serving of blueberries (68g): 38.8kcal  

Cherries, Weighed With Stone

Calories in 100g of cherries

Calories39kcal
Carbohydrate9.5g
Protein0.7g
Fat0.1g
Fibre0.7g

Calories in 1 serving of cherries (28g): 9.1kcal  

Clementines, Without Peel

Calories in 100g of clementines

Calories47kcal
Carbohydrate12.02g
Protein0.85g
Fat0.15g
Fibre1.7g

Calories in 1 medium peeled clementine (46g): 21.6kcal  

Cranberries

Calories in 100g of cranberries

Calories15kcal
Carbohydrate3.4g
Protein0.4g
Fat0.1g
Fibre3g

Calories in 1 serving of cranberries (28g): 4.2kcal  

Damsons, Weighed With Stone

Calories in 100g of damsons

Calories30.6kcal
Carbohydrate7.7g
Protein0.5g
Fat0g
Fibre1.4g

Calories in 1 serving of damsons (28g): 8.6kcal  

Dates, Yellow, Fresh

Calories in 100g of dates

Calories107.4kcal
Carbohydrate27.1g
Protein1.3g
Fat0.1g
Fibre1.5g

Calories in 1 date (20g): 21.5kcal  

Dried Dates

Calories in 100g of dried dates

Calories266.3kcal
Carbohydrate64.1g
Protein2.8g
Fat0.4g
Fibre4.1g

Calories in 1 date (20g): 53.3kcal  

Figs, Fresh

Calories in 100g of figs

Calories45kcal
Carbohydrate9.8g
Protein1.3g
Fat0.2g
Fibre1.5g

Calories in 1 fig (35g): 15.8kcal  

Goji Berries, Dried

Calories in 100g of goji berries

Calories287.2kcal
Carbohydrate65.1g
Protein6.6g
Fat0.7g
Fibre6.8g

Calories in 1 serving of goji berries (100g): 287.2kcal  

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Gooseberries, Cooking

Calories in 100g of gooseberries

Calories25kcal
Carbohydrate3g
Protein1.1g
Fat0.4g
Fibre2.4g

Calories in 1 serving of gooseberries (100g): 25kcal  

Grapefruit, Flesh Only

Calories in 100g of grapefruit

Calories30kcal
Carbohydrate6.8g
Protein0.8g
Fat0.1g
Fiber1.3g

Calories in ½ a grapefruit (160g): 48kcal  

Grapes, Green

Calories in 100g of green grapes

Calories61.5kcal
Carbohydrate15.2g
Protein0.4g
Fat0.1g
Fibre0.7g

Calories in a serving of green grapes (80g): 49kcal

For calories in different types and serving sizes of grapes see our listing here

Grapes, Red

Calories in 100g of red grapes

Calories65.1kcal
Carbohydrate15.8g
Protein0.4g
Fat0.1g
Fibre0.6g

Calories in 1 serving of red grapes (80g): 52.1kcal  

Guava, Flesh Only

Calories in 100g of guava

Calories68kcal
Carbohydrate14g
Protein3g
Fat1g
Fibre5g

Calories in 1 guava (55g): 37.4kcal  


Meal Plan for Increasing Fruits and Veggies

Also, don’t forget that eating many fruits and vegetables when you’re pregnant or breastfeeding can help prime your baby for acceptance of these foods down the line. The more varied your diet, the more flavor exposure for your baby. In the short term, this may lead to your baby being a less picky eater and more willing to try new foods. In the long-term, you’ll help your baby get off to a good start for a lifetime of healthy eating preferences.

Pro tip:

Eat a variety of types and colors of produce in order to give your body the mix of nutrients it needs. Try dark leafy greens, brightly colored red, yellow, and orange vegetables and fruits, and aim to eat both raw and cooked fruits and veggies. Eating a variety of fruits and vegetables is a wonderful way to help optimize your nutrient intake while at the same time packing a powerful punch of flavors and textures to your diet.

Some simple tips that may make all the difference in getting you and your family to increase your fruit and veggie intake include:

  • Keeping bags of frozen veggies in the freezer that you can throw in the microwave on short notice
  • Keeping bags of frozen cut-up fruit for a refreshing snack to eat “as is” or to throw in a blender to make a quick smoothie
  • Keeping cut-up fresh fruit and veggies in the refrigerator where everyone can see them and easily get to them (not hidden in the fruit drawer)
  • Roasting a batch of veggies on Sunday to last for the week

Choosing meals and snacks from the below-listed options will help you consume foods that will increase your dietary fruit and vegetable intake while enhancing the quality of your and your baby’s diet.

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Breakfast

  • Option 1: Cottage cheese and cantaloupe
  • Option 2: Whole grain toast with smashed avocado
  • Option 3: Egg muffins: combine 6 scrambled eggs, chopped veggies like peppers and spinach, and cheddar cheese. Bake at 350 degrees in a greased 12-muffin pan for 20-22 minutes
  • Option 4: Baked apple (bake cored apple at 350 degrees for 15 minutes), top with toasted oats and yogurt
  • Option 5: Vegetable omelet (red pepper, spinach, onion, mushroom) topped with sliced avocado served with an orange on the side

Lunch

  • Option 1: Tropical Salad: Spinach topped with grilled chicken, matchstick carrots, mango slices, cashews, avocado, and shaved, unsweetened coconut
  • Option 2: Whole grain pasta tossed with grilled summer squash and fresh pesto served with apple slices on the side
  • Option 3: Whole grain pita with mashed avocado or hummus spread, filled with roasted red peppers, cucumbers, lettuce, tomatoes, and a slice of pepper jack cheese. Served with grapes on the side
  • Option 4: Vegetable bean soup (low sodium if packaged) served with baked kale chip “crackers”
  • Option 5: Cooked farro tossed with chopped carrots, tomatoes, onions, yellow and green peppers, feta cheese, and Greek olives, with olive oil, lemon juice, and salt and pepper on a bed of lettuce. Orange slices and raspberries on the side

Dinner

  • Option 1: Tofu stir-fried with snap peas, water chestnuts, peppers, and scallions served over brown rice
  • Option 2: Grilled steak, steamed green beans with slivered almonds, and baked sweet potato wedges
  • Option 3: Whole grain pasta tossed with grilled chicken breast, tomatoes, onions, and eggplant, with garlic and olive oil
  • Option 4: Sautéed shrimp over green and yellow zucchini noodles, sautéed with red and green peppers, onions, and tomato sauce
  • Option 5: Baked sweet potato topped with pulled BBQ chicken or pork with a mixed vegetable salad

Snack

  • Option 1: Frozen banana treat: Slice banana in half lengthwise and spread with nut butter; wrap, and freeze
  • Option 2: Hummus with carrots, celery, and cucumbers
  • Option 3: Greek Yogurt and fruit parfait: Plain Greek yogurt layered with berries and topped with nuts
  • Option 4: Packaged mixed frozen fruit slices – strawberries, peaches, mango, or cherries. Pour in a bowl and eat partially frozen for a sorbet-like consistency – great guilt-free dessert!
  • Option 5: Cottage cheese with sliced peaches 

IMPORTANCE OF FRUITS TO THE BODY

1. Eating lots of fruit lowers the risk of developing disease

Eating fruit every day lowers the risk of so many diseases, it’s hard to list them all! For starters, a 2003 study found that eating fruit (and veggies) lowers your risk of developing heart disease. Since heart disease is the #1 killer in the US, that’s definitely a major benefit that helps us all.

In 2003, the Harvard School of Public Health also found that eating whole fruits may help lower the risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes. Fruit can also help control your blood pressure, reduce your risk of developing certain cancers, and so much more. Some smaller preliminary studies found that it may even help prevent certain eye diseases and stave off dementia.

The bottom line, eat more fruit and you just may live a longer and healthier life!

2. Snacking on fruit makes you strong

As part of an overall healthy diet, fruit can really help make your bones and muscles stronger. A 2011 Florida State University study found that eating dried plums, in particular, can help prevent osteoporosis. Other fruits for healthy bones include avocados, cranberries, and tomatoes.

You’ll also want to snack on fruits rich in magnesium, as the mineral helps your body absorb calcium. These include bananas, most berries (black, blue and strawberries), figs, grapefruit, and even watermelon.

As far as muscles go, a 2020 study done by the University of East Anglia found that vitamin C can help you retain muscle mass. I don’t think I have to remind you that fruits are just loaded with C!

Ceramic cup with salad made from fresh fruits

3. Water content in fruit helps keep you hydrated

Certain fruits are super high in water content, which helps keep your whole body hydrated. While straight and plain water is always best, eating more fruit can help you reach your daily requirement, especially if you’re just not a fan of the plain stuff.

Watermelon is the obvious choice, as its name implies. Did you know that strawberries also have about 92% water content, though? Grapefruit and cantaloupe are also made up of about 90% water. Even apples are a good option, with about 86% water.

4. All fruit has antioxidants that combat free radicals

If you don’t know, free radicals are nasty little unstable atoms that make us age faster, damage our healthy cells, and even cause cancer. Antioxidants are substances that help fight them off. While all fruits have them to some degree, ripe fruits are especially loaded with antioxidants, according to this study.

Healthy eating, assortment of raw fruits and berries platter on the off white background, top view, copy spac

5. Fruit is high in fiber, which helps keep you fit and healthy

One of the greatest benefits of fruit is all the healthy fiber in them. According to the USDA, it helps reduce blood cholesterol levels. That, in turn, goes back to the first point- it lowers your risk of heart disease. Fiber is also super important for healthy bowels. It helps keep you “regular,” which can prevent issues like constipation, hemorrhoids, and diverticulosis.

Foods high in fiber and low in calories can also help you lose weight (or keep it off) because they make you feel full longer. They also control your blood sugar, which again, helps you eat less junk throughout the day.

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