Eating Banana Good For Weight Loss

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When you’re considering what to eat, it’s important to think about the nutrients that each food contains. While it’s not always necessary to know the details about each and every nutrient, there are some that are particularly beneficial for your health. The following is a list of foods that are high in magnesium and potassium.

Potassium is needed by the body in order to maintain healthy blood pressure levels, and it’s also needed for muscle contractions. Magnesium is also an essential mineral, but it isn’t as important as potassium. It helps with muscle contraction as well as other processes like nerve transmission.

While we need these minerals in our diet, they aren’t always easy to find or absorb from food sources. If you’re interested in getting more of them into your diet then try adding some of these foods with magnesium and potassium into your day:

  • Almonds
  • Bananas
  • Black beans
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts

All of these foods contain both potassium and magnesium, so they’ll help with keeping your body functioning properly!

Food With Magnesium And Potassium

Magnesium and potassium go hand-in-hand in regulating blood pressure. But that’s not all these minerals do.

Magnesium is vital for managing nerve and muscle function, regulating blood pressure and blood sugar, and making protein and DNA, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Potassium helps contract muscles, relax blood vessels, keep the heart and kidneys healthy and support cell function, according to the NIH.

The top magnesium-rich foods are grains, nuts, legumes, fish and leafy green vegetables. Meanwhile, foods high in potassium include fruits and vegetables, milk and yogurt, legumes, nuts, meat and poultry. But finding picks with both nutrients can sometimes be a challenge.

Look to the foods high in magnesium and potassium list below and note that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) calculates its Daily Value (DV) percentages based on eating 420 milligrams of magnesium and 4,700 milligrams of potassium per day.

1. Swiss Chard

Sauteed magnesium- and potassium-rich Swiss chard on a black plate with a fork
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Leafy green vegetables like Swiss chard are excellent sources of magnesium and potassium.Image Credit: bhofack2/iStock/GettyImages

Per 1 cup:

  • Magnesium: 150.5 mg, 36% DV
  • Potassium: 960.8 mg, 20% DV

It may come as no surprise that leafy green vegetables are rich in nutrients and Swiss chard is no exception. Not only is this vegetable an excellent source of magnesium and potassium, but it’s also high in iron and vitamins A, C, E and K. One cup of cooked Swiss chard offers 36 percent magnesium DV and 20 percent DV of potassium, according to the USDA.

2. Edamame

Magnesium- and potassium-rich green soy beans (edamame) in the wood bowl on table
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Edamame provide magnesium and potassium, and are very filling thanks to their high protein and fiber content.Image Credit: sommail/iStock/GettyImages

Per 1 cup:

  • Magnesium: 147.9 mg, 35% DV
  • Potassium: 885.8 mg, 19% DV

Edamame, or green soybeans, are high in protein and fiber, making them incredibly filling as a snack or plant-based protein base for any meal. You’ll get 35 percent of the magnesium DV and 19 percent DV of potassium in 1 cup of cooked edamame. But the nutrient load doesn’t end there: These green soybeans are rich in folate, manganese, copper, thiamin and vitamin K.

3. Spinach

A white pan containing magnesium- and potassium-rich cooked spinach.
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Add spices, oil and lemon juice to spinach for more flavor and to better enjoy this immune-boosting vegetable.Image Credit: Ralf Menache/iStock/GettyImages

Per 1 cup:

  • Magnesium: 156.6 mg, 37% DV
  • Potassium: 838.8 mg, 18% DV

If you’re looking for a healthy dose of magnesium and potassium but don’t like the slightly bitter taste of Swiss chard, spinach has your back. One cup of cooked spinach provides 37 percent of the magnesium DV and 18 percent DV of potassium.

Spinach is also rich in folate and vitamins A, C and E. All of these nutrients, along with magnesium, are essential for a healthy immune system to fight against infection, according to a January 2020 review published in ​Nutrients​. Try roasting spinach instead of steaming it for a more flavorful side dish.

4. Cannellini Beans

A white bowl filled with magnesium- and potassium-rich cooked cannellini beans and herbs on a tan tablecloth.
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Cannelini beans are an excellent source of fiber, magnesium, and potassium, and can help regulate blood pressure.Image Credit: dulezidar/iStock/GettyImages

Per 1 cup:

  • Magnesium: 112.8 mg, 27% DV
  • Potassium: 1004.2 mg, 21% DV

Cannellini beans are large white beans that are sometimes referred to as white kidney beans. Just 1 cup of cooked cannellini beans provides you with 27 percent magnesium DV and 21 percent DV of potassium.

Legumes (like cannellini beans) are high in fiber and plant-based protein, contributing to their wide range of health benefits. For example, a diet containing at least 1 cup of legumes per day is tied to a reduced risk of heart disease and helping regulate blood sugar and blood pressure in people with type 2 diabetes, according to a November 2012 study in ​Archives of Internal Medicine​. Try them in these protein-packed bean recipes.

5. Acorn Squash

Magnesium- and potassium-rich baked and sliced acorn squash on a blue napkin with a spoon
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Roast acorn squash for a rich and deep, naturally sweet flavor.Image Credit: bhofack2/iStock/GettyImages

Per 1 cup:

  • Magnesium: 88.1 mg, 21% DV
  • Potassium: 895.9 mg, 19% DV

Acorn squash is a nutritious winter squash similar to delicata and butternut squash and ranks high on the list of vegetables with potassium and magnesium. It tastes best when it is boiled and mashed, roasted or baked. One cup of cooked acorn squash contains vitamin C, 32 percent of the DV of fiber, 21 percent of the magnesium DV and 19 percent of the potassium DV.

6. Salmon

Plate of magnesium- and potassium-rich salmon with tomatoes and rice on a dark wooden surface.
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Aim for two servings of salmon each week to benefit your heart and brain health.Image Credit: gbh007/iStock/GettyImages

Per 6-ounce serving:

  • Magnesium: 62.9 mg, 15% DV
  • Potassium: 1067.6 mg, 23% DV

Salmon is probably best known for being one of the best foods high in omega-3 fatty acids. But that’s not all that this fatty fish is good for. A 6-ounce fillet of cooked wild salmon offers 23 percent potassium DV and 15 percent DV of magnesium. It’s also high in protein, vitamins B6 and B12, folate and selenium.

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends eating fatty fish like salmon twice a week to reap the benefits for heart health. Plus, the omega-3s in salmon are linked to a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease, according to Harvard Health Publishing. Try these healthy and easy salmon recipes next time you’re making dinner.

7. Avocados

Hand squeezing lime onto magnesium- and potassium-rich avocado on toastwich
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Eat avocados for breakfast to help your heart health and make your skin glow.Image Credit: Rouzes/E+/GettyImages

Per 1 whole avocado:

  • Magnesium: 58.3 mg, 14% DV
  • Potassium: 974.9 mg, 21% DV

Avocados became so popular that there was a global shortage for several years, yet that doesn’t stop people from adding this magnesium-rich fruit to their grocery lists. Whether or not you’re still getting over the fact that avocados are not vegetables, you can’t deny that they are quite nutritious and provide plenty of healthy, unsaturated fats, folate and vitamins C, E and K.

Avocados might not be the first food that comes to mind when you think of fruit with potassium and magnesium. But with 21 percent of the DV of potassium and 14 percent of the magnesium DV in one whole avocado, they offer more of these nutrients than many other fruits (for reference, there’s only 10 percent DV potassium and 9 percent of the DV of magnesium in a banana). Try these creative avocado recipes that go beyond avocado toast and guacamole.

8. Potatoes

Magnesium- and potassium-rich baked potato on foil
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Keep the skin on your baked potatoes to get even more nutrients like fiber.Image Credit: rijayaNita/iStock/GettyImages

Per 1 medium potato:

  • Magnesium: 48.4 mg, 12% DV
  • Potassium: 925.6 mg, 20% DV

Potatoes don’t get the credit they deserve. While some people tout taters as unhealthy because they’re not low-carb, they are actually quite nutrient-packed (as long as you’re not deep-frying them).

You get 20 percent of the potassium DV and 12 percent DV of magnesium in one medium baked potato with skin, as well as vitamins C and B6, iron, protein and 14 percent of the DV of fiber. Yes, eating potatoes with the skin makes a big difference: The skin contains many nutrients, including about half of the fiber in potatoes. So give it a good wash and scrub and avoid peeling if you can, and try these healthy potato recipes.

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13 Foods High in Magnesium for Muscle and Nerve Health

Magnesium plays a critical role in our bodies: It regulates our muscle and nerve function, blood sugar levels and blood pressure as well as helps make protein, bone and DNA, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Despite how vital it is, most Americans don’t get enough magnesium, which is why it’s deemed a shortfall nutrient.

How Much Magnesium Do You Need?

Adults assigned male at birth need 400 to 420 milligrams of magnesium per day and adults assigned female at birth need 310 to 320 milligrams per day, according to the NIH.

And no, Epsom salt baths don’t count as getting your magnesium fix. There seems to be no credible research that says transdermal magnesium (Epsom salt baths, creams, sprays) can help your body absorb it and reap the health benefits, according to an August 2017 study in ​Nutrients​.

Take this list of foods high in magnesium on your next food shopping trip to get more of this mineral. Note that the FDA’s Daily Value (DV) percentages are based on eating 420 milligrams of magnesium per day.

1. Spinach: 156.6 mg, 37% DV

Healthy sautéed magnesium-rich spinach with minced garlic in white bowl on kitchen cloth
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Sautee your favorite leafy green vegetable, like spinach, with olive oil and garlic for a delicious side dish.Image Credit: AmalliaEka/iStock/GettyImages

Dark leafy greens are known for being nutritional powerhouses, and spinach is no exception. Not only is Popeye’s favorite food high in folate, potassium, calcium and fiber, it’s also a vegan food high in magnesium, providing 37 percent of your DV per cup cooked.

2. Squash and Pumpkin Seeds: 156.2 mg, 37% DV

Squash and pumpkin seeds are good sources of fiber, plant-based protein and iron. They offer 37 percent of the DV for magnesium per 1-ounce serving and are rich in healthy unsaturated fat, deeming them a keto food high in magnesium. Plus, they’re easy to add to any dish: Mix them with your favorite trail mix or add atop your salads for crunch.

3. Lima Beans: 125.8 mg, 30% DV

Love ’em or hate ’em, lima beans are one of the best beans around when it comes to nutritional value. Cooked lima beans provide 37 percent of your daily fiber needs, 30 percent of your daily magnesium needs and nearly 12 grams of plant-based protein per 1 cooked cup. Try them in these deliciously easy bean recipes.

4. Black Beans: 120.4 mg, 29% DV

Black beans pair perfectly with rice for a hearty dish of complete protein, providing all nine essential amino acids, and filling fiber. Plus, 1 cup of cooked black beans contains 29 percent of the DV for magnesium. Eating pulses, like black beans, regularly can help with weight loss, according to a May 2016 study in the ​American Journal of Clinical Nutrition​.

5. Quinoa: 118.4 mg, 28% DV

Quinoa, in all its colors, is a favorite for vegetarians and vegans because it offers complete protein. Quinoa is also rich in fiber. Cooked, the grain has 28 percent of the DV for magnesium per 1 cooked cup.

Its versatility makes quinoa a good candidate for stir-fries, grain-based salads or complex-carb side dishes — and these delicious quinoa recipes.

6. Flaxseeds: 111.3 mg, 27% DV

magnesium-rich flax seeds on wooden spoon
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Flaxseeds offer heart-healthy, plant-based omega-3 fatty acids called ALA.Image Credit: Amarita/iStock/GettyImages

Flaxseeds have a subtle nutty flavor, making them a good addition to your favorite oatmeal, yogurt, cereal or stir-fry. Not only does ground flaxseed mix more seamlessly into your dishes, but experts also say it’s easier for your body to digest than whole flaxseed, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Flaxseeds offer unsaturated fat and fiber for heart health, as well as magnesium — 27 percent of the DV per 1-ounce serving.

7. Edamame: 99.2 mg, 24% DV

Edamame, or immature soybeans, is a popular appetizer at Japanese restaurants. They’re simple, poppable and nutritious, thanks to their plant-based protein, fiber, iron and unsaturated fat.

One cup of cooked edamame provides 24 percent of the DV for magnesium.

8. Brown Rice: 85.8 mg, 20% DV

Brown rice is a whole grain, meaning it contains all three parts of the grain — the bran, endosperm and germ. The bran and the germ carry the most nutrients, including antioxidants, B vitamins, fiber and protein, according to the Whole Grains Council. When grains are refined (think: white flour and white rice), those nutritious parts are removed, leaving you with just the endosperm’s starch.

A diet high in whole grains, like brown rice, is linked to a lower risk of dying from heart disease, according to a March 2015 study in ​JAMA Internal Medicine​.

Plus, cooked brown rice contains 20 percent of the DV for magnesium per cup.

9. Lentils: 71.3 mg, 17% DV

Lentils are a low-fat, high-fiber, protein-rich legume that works well in a variety of dishes. Cooked lentils offer 17 percent of the DV for magnesium per cup.

The legume comes in different colors, with slightly different benefits. For example, black lentils are rich in the antioxidant anthocyanin, which is often found in purple and blue foods, according to an August 2017 study in ​Food and Nutrition Research​. Try it in these protein-packed lentil recipes.

10. Whole-Wheat Pasta: 63.2 mg, 15% DV

Just like brown rice, whole-wheat pasta is a whole grain. That means, compared to white pasta, it provides more nutrition, including fiber (4.6 grams versus 2.2 grams) and protein (8 grams versus 7 grams). The fiber and protein content in whole-wheat pasta can help you feel full longer, according to the American Diabetes Association.

Even more, a 1-cup serving of cooked whole-wheat pasta has 15 percent of the DV for magnesium.

11. Dark Chocolate: 64.8 mg, 15% DV

Why yes, dark chocolate does have health benefits — when you choose the right kind. A 1-ounce serving of 70 to 85 percent dark chocolate (sorry, no milk chocolate) provides heart-healthy antioxidants and 15 percent of the DV for magnesium.

12. Avocados: 58.3 mg, 14% DV

magnesium-rich whole and sliced avocado on wood
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Avocados provide healthy unsaturated fat, fiber, vitamins C and E and magnesium.Image Credit: Westend61/Westend61/GettyImages

If you’re a fan of the ever-popular avocado toast, you’re reaping plenty of benefits from the nutrition avocados provide. The fruit (yes, avocado is a fruit!) is high in fat — 30 grams per avocado — but that fat is largely unsaturated, meaning it’s good for your heart, according to an April 2018 review in the ​American Journal of Clinical Nutrition​.

Avocados contain vitamins C and E, protein and more than 50 percent of the DV of fiber as well as 14 percent of the magnesium DV. Try it in these creative avo recipes.

13. Bananas: 40.5 mg, 10% DV

Bananas might be one of the most convenient, nutritious snacks made by nature, and there’s no doubt they pair well with so much, including nut butter and honey. They’re a popular fuel choice for athletes, thanks to their quick-acting carbs and potassium and other electrolytes, including magnesium, that might help prevent or stop muscle cramping.

In fact, bananas are a fruit high in magnesium: 1 cup offers 10 percent of the DV. One large banana has 9 percent of the DV. Try them in these tasty banana recipes.

See the foods high in magnesium chart below for the top 10 picks.

The Top 10 Foods High in Magnesium

FoodServing SizeMagnesium Content
Spinach1 cup cooked156.6 mg, 37% DV
Squash and Pumpkin Seeds1 ounce156.2 mg, 37% DV
Lima Beans1 cup cooked125.8 mg, 30% DV
Black Beans1 cup cooked120.4 mg, 29% DV
Quinoa1 cup cooked118.4 mg, 28% DV
Flaxseeds1 ounce111.3 mg, 27% DV
Edamame1 cup cooked99.2 mg, 24% DV
Brown Rice1 cup cooked85.8 mg, 20% DV
Lentils1 cup cooked71.3 mg, 17% DV
Whole-Wheat Pasta1 cup cooked63.2 mg, 15% DV
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magnesium rich fruits

Magnesium is an important mineral that your body needs in order to function. It produces energy and regulates blood sugar and chemical reactions in the body.

Magnesium helps maintain the proper levels of other minerals such as calcium, potassium, and zinc. Your heart, muscles, and kidneys all need magnesium to work properly. The mineral also helps build teeth and bones.

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Some health conditions can lead to magnesium deficiencies, including:

  • gastrointestinal diseases like irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease, and celiac disease
  • diabetes
  • kidney disease
  • stomach viruses that cause vomiting and diarrhea

Drinking too much alcohol or caffeine on a regular basis can affect your magnesium levels as well.

The National Institutes of Health Trusted Source recommends the following daily intake of magnesium:

  • Children 1-3 years: 80 mg
  • Children 4-8 years: 130 mg
  • Children 9-13 years: 240 mg
  • Teens 14-18 years: boys 410 mg and girls 360 mg
  • Adults 19-30 years: men 400 mg and women 310 mg
  • Adults 31+ years: men 420 mg and women 320 mg

Magnesium is found naturally in many different foods. Although magnesium deficiency is rare, many Americans don’t get as much of the mineral as they should in their diets. Still, the average adult may only get 66 percent of their daily-recommended magnesium in their normal diet. This could be a result of the amount of processed foods we eat.

The following 10 foods are some of the best natural sources of magnesium. Try incorporating more of these foods into your diet to get a magnesium boost.

1. Whole Wheat

Wholewheat bread sliced
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Most whole grains are a good source of magnesium, but whole wheat flour wins with 160 mg per cup. Use whole wheat instead of white flour for baking, and buy whole wheat bread at the store.

2. Spinach

Spinach leaves
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Dark, leafy greens are rich with nutrients, and spinach is no exception.

One cup of boiled spinach has 157 mg of magnesium.

3. Quinoa

Quinoa seeds
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Quinoa is prepared and eaten in a way that’s similar to rice. It’s known for its many health benefits, including a high protein and mineral content.

One cup of cooked quinoa has 118 mg of magnesium.

4. Almonds, Cashews, and Peanuts

Almonds
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Not only are almonds, cashews, and peanuts a healthy snack, but they’re also packed with magnesium.

One ounce of almonds has 80 mg, or about 20 percent of your recommended daily intake. Cashews have 74 mg per ounce, and 2 tablespoons of peanut butter contain 49 mg of magnesium.

These toasted nuts can be added to a variety of dishes for extra texture and flavor.

5. Dark Chocolate

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Dark chocolate has 64 mg of magnesium in a 1 oz serving and one square is loaded with antioxidants which is great for heart health. Choose a dark chocolate with 70% cocoa solids.

6. Black Beans

Black beans
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All beans have health benefits, but when it comes to magnesium, black beans come out on top. They boast 120 mg per cup.

Warm up this winter with spicy black bean chili, or try making easy black bean dip for your next gathering.

7. Edamame

Edamame beans
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Edamame are soy beans still in the pods.

They’re usually steamed or boiled and can be eaten plain or added to a dish.

Half a cup of shelled, cooked edamame beans have 50 mg of magnesium.

8. Avocado

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Avocados have 58 mg of magnesium per fruit which is 16% of your needs for the day, and they also contain healthy fats (which are good for heart and brain health).

Avocados are high in B vitamins and Vitamin K, and have more potassium than bananas.

9. Tofu

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Tofu is an excellent meat substitute, whether you’re a vegetarian or just looking to switch things up a bit.

Half a cup of tofu has 37 mg of magnesium.

10. Cultured Yoghurt

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Cultured yogurt is a nutrient-rich food that has 30 mg of magnesium per cup and is a great source of protein. Not to mention it contains omega-3 fatty acids, many vitamins and minerals, and gut-healthy probiotics.

Be Wary of Phytic Acids

  • Soak, sprout, ferment, and cook plant foods
  • Eat vitamin C rich foods with meals containing phytic acid
  • Use vinegar in salad dressing and cooking to enhance mineral absorption and offset phytic acid

Medically reviewed by Katherine Mare

Some health conditions can lead to magnesium deficiencies, including:

gastrointestinal diseases like irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease, and celiac disease
diabetes
kidney disease
stomach viruses that cause vomiting and diarrhea
Drinking too much alcohol or caffeine on a regular basis can affect your magnesium levels as well.

The National Institutes of HealthTrusted Source recommends the following daily intake of magnesium:

Children 1-3 years: 80 mg
Children 4-8 years: 130 mg
Children 9-13 years: 240 mg
Teens 14-18 years: boys 410 mg and girls 360 mg
Adults 19-30 years: men 400 mg and women 310 mg
Adults 31+ years: men 420 mg and women 320 mg
Magnesium is found naturally in many different foods. Although magnesium deficiency is rare, many Americans don’t get as much of the mineral as they should in their diets. Still, the average adult may only get 66 percent of their daily-recommended magnesium in their normal diet. This could be a result of the amount of processed foods we eat.

The following 10 foods are some of the best natural sources of magnesium. Try incorporating more of these foods into your diet to get a magnesium boost.

  1. Whole Wheat
    Most whole grains are a good source of magnesium, but whole wheat flour wins with 160 mg per cup. Use whole wheat instead of white flour for baking, and buy whole wheat bread at the store.
  2. Spinach
    Dark, leafy greens are rich with nutrients, and spinach is no exception.

One cup of boiled spinach has 157 mg of magnesium.

  1. Quinoa
    Quinoa is prepared and eaten in a way that’s similar to rice. It’s known for its many health benefits, including a high protein and mineral content.

One cup of cooked quinoa has 118 mg of magnesium.

  1. Almonds, Cashews, and Peanuts
    Not only are almonds, cashews, and peanuts a healthy snack, but they’re also packed with magnesium.

One ounce of almonds has 80 mg, or about 20 percent of your recommended daily intake. Cashews have 74 mg per ounce, and 2 tablespoons of peanut butter contain 49 mg of magnesium.

These toasted nuts can be added to a variety of dishes for extra texture and flavor.

  1. Dark Chocolate
    Dark chocolate has 64 mg of magnesium in a 1 oz serving and one square is loaded with antioxidants which is great for heart health. Choose a dark chocolate with 70% cocoa solids.
  2. Black Beans
    All beans have health benefits, but when it comes to magnesium, black beans come out on top. They boast 120 mg per cup.

Warm up this winter with spicy black bean chili, or try making easy black bean dip for your next gathering.

  1. Edamame
    Edamame are soy beans still in the pods.

They’re usually steamed or boiled and can be eaten plain or added to a dish.

Half a cup of shelled, cooked edamame beans have 50 mg of magnesium.

  1. Avocado
    Avocados have 58 mg of magnesium per fruit which is 16% of your needs for the day, and they also contain healthy fats (which are good for heart and brain health).

Avocados are high in B vitamins and Vitamin K, and have more potassium than bananas.

  1. Tofu
    Tofu is an excellent meat substitute, whether you’re a vegetarian or just looking to switch things up a bit.

Half a cup of tofu has 37 mg of magnesium.

  1. Cultured Yoghurt
    Cultured yogurt is a nutrient-rich food that has 30 mg of magnesium per cup and is a great source of protein. Not to mention it contains omega-3 fatty acids, many vitamins and minerals, and gut-healthy probiotics.

Be Wary of Phytic Acids

Soak, sprout, ferment, and cook plant foods
Eat vitamin C rich foods with meals containing phytic acid
Use vinegar in salad dressing and cooking to enhance mineral absorption and offset phytic acid
Last medically reviewed on July 26, 2017

Nutrition / DietCat 1minerals
7 sourcescollapsed

Medically reviewed by Katherine Marengo LDN, R.D., Nutrition — Written by Rena Goldman on July 26, 2017

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