Food With Caffeine List

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This list of Foods with caffeine will be helpful. From coffee to Coca-Cola, we’ll show you what foods to avoid – and which ones you can eat without any guilt! Caffeine is naturally found in the fruit, leaves, and beans of coffee, cacao, and guarana plants. It is also added to beverages and supplements.

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Food With Caffeine List

1. Coffee and Tea

Perhaps the most obvious, regular coffee and black tea reign supreme when we think about foods with caffeine. The amount varies, depending on the serving size and how strong you make your brew. Some people are surprised to learn that green and white teas also contain have, although usually a lesser amount compared to black tea.

Another potential surprise is the fact that decaffeinated coffee is not caffeine-free. While an 8-ounce cup of regular coffee has about 80 to 100 milligrams of caffeine, a cup of decaf only has around 2 to 15 milligrams, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Specialty coffee and tea drinks also contain variable amounts of caffeine. For example, a Caffè Latte from Starbucks has about 150 milligrams of caffeine.

2. Soda and Other Soft Drinks

Soda is another source of caffeine, and some varieties have more than others. According to the FDA, a 12-ounce can of soda typically has 30 to 40 milligrams of caffeine. Pepper-flavored sodas and some brands of root beer, lemon-lime soda and fruit-flavored drink mixes have caffeine, as do most chocolate beverages.

Some bottled waters also contain caffeine, often in amounts similar to those of coffee or tea. And don’t forget about coffee liqueurs, which are used in many mixed drinks.

3. Energy Drinks

Many other beverages, like energy drinks, also rely on a caffeine jolt. In fact, the caffeine in an energy drink can range anywhere from 40 to 250 mg per 8-ounces, per the FDA.

Keep in mind, these drinks will often have more than one serving per container, and if you drink the whole thing, you’ll be taking in a lot of caffeine.

4. Chocolate (and Chocolate Products)

You might be surprised to learn that even chocolate milk has some caffeine, according to a March 2016 article in the journal ​Nutrients​. Cocoa beans naturally contain caffeine, so all chocolate and chocolate-flavored foods have some — assuming they are made with cocoa.

As a rule of thumb, the darker the chocolate, the more caffeine is has. For example, 1 ounce of milk chocolate typically has 6 milligrams of caffeine, but the same amount of dark chocolate has about 20 milligrams, according to the International Food Information Council Foundation.

Sweet treats like brownies, fudge, chocolate cookies, pudding and mousse have variable amounts of caffeine, depending on the amount of cocoa in them.

5. Dessert Foods

Chocolate-, mocha- and coffee-flavored ice cream and frozen yogurt typically have some caffeine, which is increased if you top your frozen treat with some chocolate sauce or hot fudge.

Coffee, mocha and chocolate yogurts might also be hiding caffeine. In general, coffee- and mocha-flavored dairy products and frozen treats have more caffeine than their chocolate-flavored relatives.

6. Caffeine-Fortified Foods

Some manufacturers add caffeine to food products in order to sell them. These caffeine-fortified foods are intended to perk you up without coffee. Energy and “power” bars are popular examples.

Other products that come in caffeine-fortified varieties include sunflower seeds, nuts, frozen waffles, snack chips, beef jerky — even marshmallows, jelly beans and gummy bears.

Why You Should Avoid Caffeine

Avoiding caffeine completely can be difficult because it’s a common ingredient in many foods and drinks. But in general, your caffeine intake should not exceed 400 milligrams a day — the amount in about four to five cups of coffee.

Too much caffeine in your diet can: 

Create Dependence

Because caffeine stimulates the central nervous system, regular use can cause mild physical dependence.  Although it is not considered dangerous, caffeine withdrawal can cause unpleasant side effects.

Some symptoms of caffeine withdrawal include:

  • Headaches
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Nausea
  • Muscle Pain

Interfere With Sleep

Caffeine intake during the day decreases your level of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin — the main part of melatonin, a sleep hormone naturally produced by your body. Low melatonin can lead to sleep deprivation and insomnia. 

However, how much caffeine affects your sleep schedule depends on your sensitivity and how quickly you digest the substance.

Elevate Blood Pressure

Although it is unclear why it happens, high doses of caffeine can temporarily increase your blood pressure. The effect can increase your risk of heart attack and stroke. 

Top 10 Foods and Drinks High in Caffeine

Caffeine is a chemical naturally found in several plant foods and drinks. Synthetic supplemental forms of caffeine are also produced and added to foods. Due to caffeine’s stimulating and addictive qualities, it is finding its way into more and more unhealthy foods including sodas, candies, and energy drinks.

The health benefits and costs of caffeine are controversial with numerous studies to document both benefits and health problems due to caffeine. The upper intake limit (UL) of caffeine intake is 400mg for adults and less than 85mg for kids.

High caffeine foods and drinks include chocolate-covered coffee beans, coffee, energy drinks, espresso, sodas, green tea, black tea, dark chocolate, coffee liqueur, and baked goods containing chocolate.

List of High Caffeine Foods and Drinks

Chocolate coffee beans

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#1: Dark Chocolate Coated Coffee Beans

Caffeine
per oz(28 Beans)
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
336mg
(84% UL)
839mg
(210% UL)
311mg
(78% UL)
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Nutrition Facts for Dark Chocolate Coated Coffee Beans.

Cafe Americano

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#2: Coffee

Caffeine
per 8oz Cup
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
95mg
(24% UL)
40mg
(10% UL)
8000mg
(2000% UL)
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Nutrition Facts for Coffee.

An energy drink

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#3: Energy Drinks

Caffeine
per 8oz Cup
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
91mg
(23% UL)
38mg
(10% UL)
123mg
(31% UL)
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Nutrition Facts for Energy Drink.

Energy drinks are typically high in sugar, sweeteners, and other artificial additives and should be avoided.

A cup of espresso

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#4: Espresso

Caffeine
per 1oz Shot
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
63mg
(16% UL)
212mg
(53% UL)
4711mg
(1178% UL)
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Nutrition Facts for Espresso.

A can of soda

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#5: Sodas

Caffeine
per 16oz Bottle
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
49mg
(12% UL)
10mg
(3% UL)
49mg
(12% UL)
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Nutrition Facts for Pepper Soda.

Energy drinks are typically high in sugar, sweeteners, and other artificial additives and should be avoided.

A cup of green tea

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#6: Green Tea

Caffeine
per 8oz Cup
Caffeine
per 100g
28mg
(7% UL)
12mg
(3% UL)
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Nutrition Facts for Green Tea.

Black Tea

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#7: Black Tea

Caffeine
per 8oz Cup
Caffeine
per 100g
26mg
(7% UL)
11mg
(3% UL)
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Nutrition Facts for Black Tea (Ready To Drink).

Dark Chocolate

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#8: Dark Chocolate

Caffeine
per 1oz Square
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
24mg
(6% UL)
86mg
(22% UL)
30mg
(7% UL)
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Nutrition Facts for Dark Chocolate (60-69% Cocoa).

  • Cocoa powder provides 198mg of caffeine per cup
  • Hot cocoa provides 5mg per cup

Bottles of Liqueur

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#9: Coffee Liqueur

Caffeine
per 1.5oz Shot
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
14mg
(3% UL)
26mg
(7% UL)
15mg
(4% UL)
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Nutrition Facts for Coffee Liqueur.

A slice of chocolate cake

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#10: Chocolate Cake with Frosting

Caffeine
per Slice
Caffeine
per 100g
Caffeine
per 200 Calories
8mg
(2% UL)
6mg
(2% UL)
3mg
(1% UL)
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Nutrition Facts for Chocolate Cake With Frosting.

Other baked goods containing caffeine include chocolate cake, chocolate-coated cookies, and anything with chocolate frosting.

Foods High in Caffeine

Caffeine is a natural chemical with stimulant effects. It is found in coffee, tea, cola, cocoa, guarana, yerba mate, and over 60 other products.

Caffeine works by stimulating the central nervous system, heart, muscles, and the centers that control blood pressure. Caffeine can raise blood pressure, but might not have this effect in people who use it all the time. Caffeine can also act like a “water pill” that increases urine flow.

People most commonly use caffeine for mental alertness, headache, migraine, athletic performance, memory, and obesity. It is also used for asthma, gallbladder disease, ADHD, low blood pressure, depression, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these other uses.

Caffeine products sold in very concentrated or pure forms are a health concern. People can easily take doses that are much too high by mistake. It’s illegal in the US for these products to be sold to consumers in bulk. Taking caffeine, within limits, is allowed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Urine concentrations over 15 mcg/mL are prohibited.

How does it work ?

Uses & Effectiveness ?

Effective for

  • Migraine. Taking caffeine by mouth together with pain relievers such aspirin and acetaminophen is effective for treating migraines. Caffeine is an FDA-approved product for use with pain relievers for treating migraine headaches.
  • Pauses in breathing that may be followed by low heart rate and low oxygen levels in newborns. Giving caffeine by mouth or by IV can improve breathing in very premature infants. Caffeine citrate is approved as a prescription drug for this condition. IV products can only be given by a healthcare provider.
  • Headache after surgery. Taking caffeine by mouth or by IV is effective for preventing headaches following surgery. Caffeine is an FDA-approved product for this use in people who regularly consume caffeine. IV products can only be given by a healthcare provider.
  • Tension headache. Taking caffeine by mouth in combination with pain relievers is effective for treating tension headaches. It is FDA-approved for this use.

Likely Effective for

  • Mental alertness. Taking caffeine by mouth improves mental alertness. But it might not be as effective as getting enough sleep.

Possibly Effective for

  • Athletic performance. Taking caffeine by mouth seems to increase physical strength and endurance and might delay fatigue during exercise. But taking more than 800 mg of caffeine daily (6-8 cups) can lead to caffeine levels greater than those allowed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).
  • A lung disease that affects newborns (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Giving caffeine by mouth or by IV to premature infants seems to reduce the risk for this lung problem. IV products can only be given by a healthcare provider.
  • Diabetes. Drinking beverages that contain caffeine is linked with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. But it’s not clear if consuming caffeine helps to treat diabetes.
  • Memory. Taking caffeine by mouth seems to improve short-term memory in college students or people with outgoing personalities.
  • Obesity. Taking caffeine by mouth together with ephedrine seems to increase weight loss, short-term. But there can be unwanted side effects. Even in carefully monitored and otherwise healthy adults, caffeine/ephedra combinations can cause changes in blood pressure and heart rate.
  • Acute pain. Taking caffeine by mouth together with painkillers such as ibuprofen can reduce pain more than painkillers alone.
  • Headache after epidural anesthesia, spinal anesthesia, or lumbar puncture. Taking caffeine by mouth or by IV seems to help prevent headache that can occur after these procedures. IV products can only be given by a healthcare provider.

Possibly Ineffective for

  • Irregular heartbeat (atrial fibrillation). Taking caffeine by mouth does not reduce the risk for this type of irregular heart rhythm following heart surgery.
  • Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Taking caffeine by mouth doesn’t reduce ADHD symptoms in children.

There is interest in using caffeine for a number of other purposes, but there isn’t enough reliable information to say whether it might be helpful.

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