Food With High Viscous Fiber

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High fiber food helps to promote healthy bowel movements and prevent constipation. Beans are among the most fiber-dense foods, with a whopping 18 grams of fiber in just 1 cup of cooked lentils. Both dried and cooked beans provide more viscous fiber than cooked whole grains like brown rice and barley, pasta, or potatoes.

Food With High Viscous Fiber

Fiber comes from plants, so don’t bother looking for it in your chicken dinner. But the plant kingdom has a lot to offer, and the best sources of dietary fiber might surprise you.

Taylor suggests aiming for 25 grams (g) to 35 grams of fiber a day. Here are her top 11 foods to work into your diet right now.

1. Whole-wheat pasta

Carbs get a bad rap, but whole grains are a great source of fiber and are also rich in healthy phytonutrients (believed to help prevent various diseases), Taylor says. Skip the white pasta (which has been stripped of all the good stuff), and go for whole-wheat instead.

Amount of fiber: 1 cup cooked = 7g fiber

2. Barley

“Barley is a delicious grain that’s often overlooked,” Taylor says. Try tossing it in soups or mix up a grain bowl with your favorite meat and veggies.

Amount of fiber: 1 cup cooked = 6g fiber

3. Chickpeas

“Legumes are star players. They’re some of the best sources of protein and fiber, they help keep you full, and they have amazing nutrient composition,” Taylor says. Chickpeas are a fiber-full favorite from the legume list. Add them to soups or salads, snack on chickpea hummus or roast them whole for a crunchy, shelf-stable snack.

Amount of fiber: 1/2 cup cooked = 6g fiber

4. Edamame

Edamame, or immature soybeans, have a mild flavor and pleasing texture. They’re also one of the few plant sources that contain all the amino acids your body needs, so they’re a great choice for vegans and vegetarians. You can find them in the frozen food section, still in the pod or already shelled. Add edamame to salads and stir-fries, Taylor suggests. (Edamame is often a big hit for kids to snack on, too.)

Amount of fiber: 1/2 cup boiled and shelled = 4g fiber

5. Lentils and split peas

These two legumes have similar nutrition profiles and are used in similar ways. “Lentils and split peas are nutritional powerhouses,” says Taylor. They cook quickly and are great in soups. Try swapping lentils for some of the meat in your chili to boost the plant-powered goodness.

Amount of fiber:

Lentils, 1/2 cup cooked = 8g fiber

Split peas, 1/2 cup boiled = 8g fiber

6. Berries

“All berries are good for you, but blackberries and raspberries have the most fiber,” Taylor explains. They’re also delicious. Fresh berries can be expensive, but frozen are often more economical. If you don’t love the mushy texture of thawed berries, blend them into a smoothie or stir them into your oatmeal. “You can also cook them down and put them on waffles in place of syrup,” she says.

Amount of fiber: 1 cup = 8g fiber

High-Fiber Foods to Up Your Daily Fiber Intake

You may already be eating high fiber foods every day. Or you may find that some foods you eat have delicious high fiber food alternatives. But do you know if you’re reaching the 28 grams of daily recommended fiber intake, every day? This high-fiber food guide can help you determine how much fiber you are getting. Taking Metamucil every day can also help ensure you get the recommended amount of daily fiber along with the high-fiber foods you add to your diet.

VEGETABLES

Vegetables

1. Broccoli Flowerets

It takes about 9 cups of broccoli flowerets to reach the daily recommended fiber intake. High in sulforaphane, broccoli also adds 3.2 grams of fiber per cup. And it’s low in calories, so add an extra helping of broccoli to help reach your fiber goals.

2. Brussels sprouts

These mini cabbages can be boiled, broiled, pan fried, or sliced up raw in a brussels sprout slaw. With 4 grams of fiber per cup, it takes about 7 cups of brussels sprouts to reach the daily recommended fiber intake.

3. Asparagus

Have you ever seen 83 asparagus spears on one plate? Probably not, unless it’s a family-style meal. That’s how many raw asparagus spears it takes to hit the 28 grams of fiber recommended for your diet. As an alternative to steamed asparagus try adding thinly sliced raw asparagus spears to salads or sandwiches for a sweet, crunchy flavor.

4. Artichokes

Artichokes taste great on pizza, paired with spinach in a delicious vegetable dip, or steamed to perfection. But can you eat 4 artichokes in a day?

5. Acorn squash

Simply cut out the stem, scoop the seeds and bake until tender. Or prepare stuffed acorn squash using wild rice, quinoa, or ground beef. You’ll need to eat about 3 cups of acorn squash to reach your fiber goals.

6. Green peas

With 9 grams of fiber per cup, help yourself to bigger helpings to add more fiber to your diet. You’ll need about 3 cups of green peas to get the daily recommended fiber intake. Flavorful and healthy, green peas are a great source of iron, manganese, and vitamins A and C.

7. Turnip greens

An excellent source of beta carotene and vitamin K, turnip greens have a mild flavor. They can be used like spinach and other leafy greens, blended into green smoothies, or juiced. It takes about 5.5 cups of turnip greens to reach your fiber goals.

8. Carrots

Lightly steamed carrots will release more of their beta carotene, but, whether you enjoy them raw or cooked, you’ll get all the benefits of 4.68 grams of fiber in each cup. It takes about 6 cups of carrots to reach the daily recommended fiber intake.

9. Cauliflower

Riced cauliflower is a popular low-carb alternative to starchy vegetables and can be made into pizza crust and chips. It’s great way to add fiber to your diet, but it may not get you to the 28 grams of daily recommended fiber every day. That would mean eating about 8.5 cups of cooked cauliflower, every day.

11 High-Fiber Foods You Should Be Eating

A bowl of high fiber lentil salad

You may not think much about fiber — until you find yourself dealing with an, er, irregular situation.

Indeed, dietary fiber is a magic ingredient that keeps you regular. But thwarting constipation is not its only job. Fiber helps lower cholesterol, reducing the risk of heart disease. It also helps reduce the risk of other diseases like colorectal cancer. Plus, it keeps your blood sugar levels from spiking and makes you feel full longer, which can help you lose weight.

“Fiber does lots of cool stuff in the body,” says registered dietitian Anna Taylor, RD.

Here’s where to get it — and why these foods are best for a high-fiber diet.

High-fiber foods you should be eating

Fiber comes from plants, so don’t bother looking for it in your chicken dinner. But the plant kingdom has a lot to offer, and the best sources of dietary fiber might surprise you.

Taylor suggests aiming for 25 grams (g) to 35 grams of fiber a day. Here are her top 11 foods to work into your diet right now.

1. Whole-wheat pasta

Carbs get a bad rap, but whole grains are a great source of fiber and are also rich in healthy phytonutrients (believed to help prevent various diseases), Taylor says. Skip the white pasta (which has been stripped of all the good stuff), and go for whole-wheat instead.

Amount of fiber: 1 cup cooked = 7g fiber

2. Barley

“Barley is a delicious grain that’s often overlooked,” Taylor says. Try tossing it in soups or mix up a grain bowl with your favorite meat and veggies.

Amount of fiber: 1 cup cooked = 6g fiber

3. Chickpeas

“Legumes are star players. They’re some of the best sources of protein and fiber, they help keep you full, and they have amazing nutrient composition,” Taylor says. Chickpeas are a fiber-full favorite from the legume list. Add them to soups or salads, snack on chickpea hummus or roast them whole for a crunchy, shelf-stable snack.

Amount of fiber: 1/2 cup cooked = 6g fiber

4. Edamame

Edamame, or immature soybeans, have a mild flavor and pleasing texture. They’re also one of the few plant sources that contain all the amino acids your body needs, so they’re a great choice for vegans and vegetarians. You can find them in the frozen food section, still in the pod or already shelled. Add edamame to salads and stir-fries, Taylor suggests. (Edamame is often a big hit for kids to snack on, too.)

Amount of fiber: 1/2 cup boiled and shelled = 4g fiber

5. Lentils and split peas

These two legumes have similar nutrition profiles and are used in similar ways. “Lentils and split peas are nutritional powerhouses,” says Taylor. They cook quickly and are great in soups. Try swapping lentils for some of the meat in your chili to boost the plant-powered goodness.

Amount of fiber:

Lentils, 1/2 cup cooked = 8g fiber

Split peas, 1/2 cup boiled = 8g fiber

6. Berries

“All berries are good for you, but blackberries and raspberries have the most fiber,” Taylor explains. They’re also delicious. Fresh berries can be expensive, but frozen are often more economical. If you don’t love the mushy texture of thawed berries, blend them into a smoothie or stir them into your oatmeal. “You can also cook them down and put them on waffles in place of syrup,” she says.

Amount of fiber: 1 cup = 8g fiber

7. Pears

Another fruit, pears are a fantastic source of fiber, Taylor notes. And compared to many other fruits, they’re particularly high in soluble fiber, which slows digestion and lowers cholesterol.

Amount of fiber: 1 medium pear = 6g fiber

8. Artichokes hearts

Artichoke hearts are packed with fiber. Add them to salads or pile them on pizza. If dealing with these spiky veggies is too daunting, try the canned kind. (But if you’re eating canned, keep an eye on sodium levels so you don’t go overboard.)

Amount of fiber: 1/2 cup cooked = 7g fiber

9. Brussels sprouts

If you’ve been avoiding Brussels sprouts since you were a kid, they’re worth a second look. “Brussels sprouts are awesome,” Taylor says. They’re delicious roasted or sautéed. (Plus, they’re cute.)

Amount of fiber: 1 cup cooked = 5g fiber

10. Chia seeds

A spoonful of chia seeds can go a long way. “They’re incredibly rich in fiber, contain omega-3 fatty acids and have a nice protein punch, too,” Taylor says. “You can throw them in oatmeal, yogurt, pudding, cereal, salads and smoothies.”

Many people love the jelly-like texture. If you aren’t one of them, try mixing them into a smoothie or yogurt right before you eat it, so they don’t have as much time to absorb water and plump up.

Amount of fiber: 2 tablespoons = 10g fiber

11. Haas avocados

Haas avocados are a great source of healthy fats. And unlike most fiber-rich foods, you can use them as a condiment, Taylor says. “You can spread avocado on sandwiches instead of mayonnaise or put it on your toast if you’re a true Millennial.” Guacamole (with whole-grain crackers or paired with raw veggies) is another delicious way to get your daily fiber.

Amount of fiber: 1/2 avocado = 5g fiber

High-fiber snacks

If you’re not ready to do a major overhaul, there are plenty of high-fiber snacks you can grab between meals, including:

  • Almonds.
  • Trail mix.
  • Popcorn.
  • Granola bars.
  • Quinoa.
  • Jicama.
  • Sweet potato fries.
  • Celery.
  • Okra.
  • Carrots.
  • Kale chips.

Eating more fiber? Read this first!

Before you jump on the fiber bandwagon, a word of caution: “Add fiber to your diet slowly,” Taylor advises. If you aren’t used to a lot of fiber, eating too much can cause bloating and cramping. Increase high-fiber foods gradually over a few weeks to avoid that inflated feeling.

Another important tip: “When adding fiber to your diet, be sure to drink enough water,” she says. Fiber pulls in water. That’s a good thing, but if you aren’t drinking enough, it can make constipation worse. To keep things moving, drink at least 2 liters of fluids each day.

Know How Viscous Fiber Helps In Weight Loss and their 2 types

Viscous Fiber:  For reducing weight, counting the calorie intake and not bothering about the Fiber intake, we are been misled.

The popular belief, more the Fiber intake, the more it instills weight loss is not completely right. If our goal is weight loss, we need to be more specific about choosing the Fiber. 

Table of Contents:

Actually, weight loss depends on what kind of Fiber you eat. Saying so, here is it explained.

What are Fibers?

Fibers are carbohydrates that cannot be digested by human gastrointestinal tracts, still, they have a significant role in our health.

Types of Fiber

1. Soluble Fiber

Soluble fiber combines with water to form a gel, for example, fibers rich foods like oats, apple or guava have incredible for a good digestive system. 

Soluble Fiber helps improve metabolism, stay healthy and lose weight whereas the insoluble Fiber acts as bulking agents that help reduce the portion size of the major meals.

2. Insoluble Fiber

Insoluble fiber is the Fiber present in whole grains and green leafy vegetables and they are not soluble in water.

Soluble and Insoluble Fiber

Soluble Fibers helps in bringing down the cholesterol.

  • It combines with fats and flushes them out of the body, thus lowering the LDL (bad) cholesterol.
  • It improves the Glycemic Index of diabetic patients by decreasing the absorption of glucose into the blood.
  • And most importantly, it is the soluble Fiber that feeds the gut bacteria in the intestine – the bacteria which keeps your digestive system healthy.
  • These friendly bacteria fight off inflammation by fighting against foreign bodies and repairing damaged cells. Inflammation is a strong driver of disease, including obesity.

We are not saying that the Insoluble Fiber has no health benefits; it has plenty.

  • Insoluble fibers help in hydrating and moving waste from the intestines thereby preventing constipation.
  • It is also responsible for the feeling of fullness or satiety.

Viscous Fiber and Weight Loss

Viscous Fiber is made up of complex sugar molecules such as polysaccharide compounds which are found in the walls of plant cells. These compounds include beta-glucans, mucilage, pectins, gums, and psyllium.

In the digestive system, these viscous fibers absorb water and swell to form a thick, jelly-like mass.

According to a study conducted by Cleveland Clinic, the resulting viscous substance slows down the rate at which a food is broken down and nutrients like glucose are absorbed.

In this way, it reduces the rise in glucose levels after consuming foods. And hence, a high intake of viscous fiber is linked to a low risk of developing diabetes.

There are studies which recommend Fiber type or dose that would help reduce appetite and enhance satiety.

And we have the specific information that would possibly help in effective weight loss through Fiber diets.

  • A review explains how the viscosity of the Fiber plays a vital role in reducing the appetite by showing that 39% of Fiber diets helped to feel full while only 22% of the Fiber diets helped in weight loss.

The viscosity of a substance is referred to as its resistance to stress, e.g., honey has high viscosity than water. Viscous soluble Fibers form a gel-like substance that remains in the gut, thereby, increasing the time taken to digest and absorb nutrients.

Though there is no specific recommendation for daily viscous fiber intake, Nutritionists, however, advise that anything between 20-30 percent of your daily dietary fiber should be viscous fiber.

This will give us prolonged satiety and a reduced appetite. Thus, as it gives the feeling of fullness, it helps in effortless weight loss. However, low viscous Fibers do not assist in weight loss.

Beans, carrot, sprouts, flax seeds, orange, apple, guava, and oats are good sources of viscous Fiber.

With the recent studies negating the intake of Fiber supplements for weight loss, it is always safe to opt for natural Fiber source for all who is on a Fiber diet.

It is wise to gradually shift to high Fiber diets, as it will otherwise have side effects like diarrhea and other abdominal discomforts.

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