Food With Magnesium Oxide

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Food with magnesium oxide contain Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays several roles in the human body, but over half of us may be deficient. Research suggests that too little magnesium may increase your risk of heart disease and diabetes, not to mention it can take a toll on your energy levels, metabolism, and sleep. Eating more magnesium-rich foods can help you address any deficiencies and improve your health. That’s why we’ve created this cookbook—to show you step by step as well as how to prepare quick and simple recipes for healthy versions of some of your favorite foods, with added magnesium where appropriate.

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Food With Magnesium Oxide

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  • Pumpkin seed – kernels: Serving Size 1 oz, 168 mg
  • Almonds, dry roasted: Serving Size 1 oz, 80 mg
  • Spinach, boiled: Serving Size ½ cup, 78 mg
  • Cashews, dry roasted: Serving Size 1 oz, 74 mg
  • Pumpkin seeds in the shell: Serving Size 1 oz, 74 mg
  • Peanuts, oil roasted: Serving Size ¼ cup, 63 mg
  • Cereal, shredded wheat: Serving Size 2 large biscuits, 61 mg
  • Soymilk, plain or vanilla: Serving Size 1 cup, 61 mg
  • Black beans, cooked: Serving Size ½ cup, 60 mg
  • Edamame, shelled, cooked: Serving Size ½ cup, 50 mg
  • Dark chocolate -60-69% cocoa: Serving Size 1 oz, 50 mg
  • Peanut butter, smooth: Serving Size 2 tablespoons, 49 mg
  • Bread, whole-wheat: Serving Size 2 slices, 46 mg
  • Avocado, cubed: Serving Size 1 cup, 44 mg
  • Potato, baked with skin: Serving Size 3.5 oz, 43 mg
  • Rice, brown, cooked: Serving Size ½ cup, 42 mg
  • Yogurt, plain, low fat: Serving Size 8 oz, 42 mg
  • Breakfast cereals fortified: Serving Size 10% fortification, 40 mg
  • Oatmeal, instant: Serving Size 1 packet, 36 mg
  • Kidney beans, canned: Serving Size ½ cup, 35 mg
  • Banana: Serving Size 1 medium, 32 mg

More

  • Cocoa powder– unsweetened: Serving Size 1 tablespoon, 27 mg
  • Salmon, Atlantic, farmed: Serving Size 3 oz, 26 mg
  • Milk: Serving Size 1 cup, 24–27 mg
  • Halibut, cooked: Serving Size 3 oz, 24 mg
  • Raisins: Serving Size ½ cup, 23 mg
  • Chicken breast, roasted: Serving Size 3 oz, 22 mg
  • Beef, ground, 90% lean: Serving Size 3 oz, 20 mg
  • Broccoli, chopped & cooked: Serving Size ½ cup, 12 mg
  • Rice, white, cooked: Serving Size ½ cup, 10 mg
  • Apple: Serving Size 1 medium, 9 mg
  • Carrot, raw: Serving Size 1 medium, 7 mg

In general rich sources of magnesium are greens, nuts, seeds, dry beans, whole grains, wheat germ, wheat, and oat bran. The recommended dietary allowance for magnesium for adult men is 400-420 mg per day. The dietary allowance for adult women is 310-320 mg per day.

For additional information please visit The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Nutrient Database website (see References) which lists the nutrient content of many foods and where you can search for a comprehensive list of foods for magnesium content.

Can too much or too little magnesium be harmful?

The magnesium that is naturally present in food is not harmful. Magnesium in dietary supplements and medications as well as should not be in amounts above the upper limit unless recommended by a healthcare provider. Cramps and diarrhea are common side effects.

Health Benefits of Magnesium Oxide

Magnesium oxide, often available in capsule form, is commonly used to help several concerns, ranging from simple low magnesium levels to more specific concerns, like the following:

Relief of Indigestion and Heartburn

Magnesium oxide may be used as an antacid to relieve indigestion and heartburn.

Relief from Constipation and Irregularity

Magnesium oxide causes the intestines to release water into the stool, which softens the stool and relieves constipation and irregularity. A dose of 250 milligrams can be repeated every 12 hours until you find relief.

Relief from Migraine

Studies have shown that patients with migraine, including cluster headaches and menstrual migraine, as well as often have low levels of magnesium, and taking supplements like magnesium oxide may be helpful. Studies suggest that magnesium ions provided by magnesium oxide interrupt the brain signals that may cause migraine. A dose of 400–500 milligrams per day may be required to be effective. This dose may also cause diarrhea as a side effect, but this can usually be controlled by starting with a smaller dose.

Other Health Benefits

Magnesium offers many other health benefits, as well as but magnesium oxide is not the best source for these benefits. Magnesium oxide has difficulty dissolving in water and is not absorbed into bodily tissues as easily as water-soluble magnesium salts, such as magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, magnesium lactate, or magnesium malate.

Health Benefits of Magnesium Oxide

Magnesium is an important macronutrient, and it is the fourth most abundant positively-charged ion in the body. It is one of the electrolytes that cause muscles to contract, and it helps regulate your nervous system, blood sugar levels, and blood pressure. Your body needs it to complete more than 300 processes involving enzymes and proteins. Sufficient magnesium can usually be obtained through a normal, healthy diet, but low levels of magnesium can lead to serious problems.

There are at least 10 chemical compounds that contain magnesium and can be used as health supplements. Each of these is better suited for some uses than for others. Magnesium oxide is best used for digestive problems and heartburn. Magnesium oxide can also be used to supplement magnesium levels in the body, but it may not work as well as other magnesium compounds that are more readily absorbed into the bloodstream, including those you can get naturally from foods.

Benefits of Magnesium Oxide

Magnesium oxide, often available in capsule form, is commonly used to help a number of concerns, ranging from simple low magnesium levels to more specific concerns, like the following:

Relief of Indigestion and Heartburn

Magnesium oxide may be used as an antacid to relieve indigestion and heartburn.

Relief from C onstipation and Irregularity

Magnesium oxide causes the intestines to release water into the stool, which softens the stool and relieves constipation and irregularity. A dose of 250 milligrams can be repeated every 12 hours until you find relief.

Relief from M igraine

Studies have shown that patients with migraine, including cluster headaches and menstrual migraine, often have low levels of magnesium, and taking supplements like magnesium oxide may be helpful. Studies suggest that magnesium ions provided by magnesium oxide interrupts the brain signals that may cause migraine. A dose of 400–500 milligrams per day may be required to be effective. This dose may also cause diarrhea as a side effect, but this can usually be controlled by starting with a smaller dose.

Other Health Benefits

Magnesium offers many other health benefits, but magnesium oxide is not the best source for these benefits. Magnesium oxide has difficulty dissolving in water and is not absorbed into bodily tissues as easily as water-soluble magnesium salts, such as magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, magnesium lactate, or magnesium malate.

Health Risks

Magnesium oxide is widely used and generally recognized as safe, but it can come with some uncomfortable side effects, such as:

Diarrhea

Because of the same properties that make it a great laxative, even when you’re using it for other health benefits, magnesium oxide can cause cramping or diarrhea.

Flu-like Symptoms

While this is usually not of concern when magnesium oxide is used as a supplement, it is good to be aware that as an industrial chemical, magnesium oxide is recognized as a hazardous substance. Inhalation and prolonged exposure to large amounts of magnesium oxide can irritate the eyes and nose, and can cause flu-like symptoms in some people.

Amounts and Dosage

Magnesium is readily available from food, and you can get a good amount from leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds and whole grains. An easy way to remember this is to associate magnesium with fiber. In most cases, foods that are good sources of fiber are also high in magnesium.

The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for magnesium is 400-420 mg per day for adult men, and 310-320 mg per day for adult women. Women who are pregnant may increase this amount to 350-360 mg per day.

If you are taking magnesium oxide for nutritional purposes, most brands recommend using tablets or capsules, and they suggest taking only 250 milligrams per day. The rest of your magnesium can be obtained from the foods you are eating.

Take capsules or tablets with a full 8 ounce glass of water and with a regular meal.

However, if you are using magnesium as a laxative to relieve occasional constipation or irregularity, you might take it in liquid form, and higher doses may be suggested. Follow the label directions, and do not use it as a laxative for more than 1 week without consulting a doctor.

As with all supplements, you should check with your doctor if you are considering adding magnesium citrate supplements to your diet.

About MAGNESIUM OXIDE

MAGNESIUM OXIDE belongs to the group of medicines called mineral supplements used to treat acute hypomagnesaemia, a condition characterized by abnormally low magnesium levels in the blood. It is also used to treat stomach upset, heartburn, and acid indigestion. It may also be used for rapid emptying of the bowel before surgery, and as a laxative to treat occasional constipation.

MAGNESIUM OXIDE contains Magnesium oxide which is involved in various body processes such as hormone receptor binding, muscular contraction, neuronal activity, neurotransmitter release, and vasomotor tone. It is an alkaliser that neutralises acid in the stomach, thereby treating heartburn, stomach upset, and indigestion. Magnesium oxide treats constipation by drawing water into the intestine and stimulating bowel movement.

You are advised to take MAGNESIUM OXIDE for as long as your doctor has prescribed it for you, depending on your medical condition. Like all medicines, MAGNESIUM OXIDE also causes side effects, although not everybody gets them. Common side effects of MAGNESIUM OXIDE include diarrhoea and cramps. Most of these side effects do not require medical attention and will resolve gradually over time. However, if these side effects persist for a longer time, please seek medical advice.

Do not take MAGNESIUM OXIDE if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. If you are pregnant/breastfeeding or have a kidney, heart, or liver problem, please inform your doctor before starting MAGNESIUM OXIDE. It is not known whether MAGNESIUM OXIDE alters the ability to drive, so do not drive or operate machinery if you experience any symptoms that affect your ability to concentrate and react. Avoid consuming alcohol along with MAGNESIUM OXIDE as it could lead to unpleasant side effects. 

Uses of MAGNESIUM OXIDE

Acute hypomagnesaemia, upset stomach, heartburn, indigestion, constipation.

Medicinal Benefits

MAGNESIUM OXIDE belongs to the group of medicines called mineral supplements used to treat acute hypomagnesaemia, a condition characterized by abnormally low magnesium levels in the blood. It is also used to treat stomach upset, heartburn, and acid indigestion. It may also be used for rapid emptying of the bowel before surgery, and as a laxative to treat occasional constipation. MAGNESIUM OXIDE is involved in various body processes such as hormone receptor binding, muscular contraction, neuronal activity, neurotransmitter release, and vasomotor tone. It is required for active potassium and calcium transport across the cell membrane. It is an alkaliser that neutralises acid in the stomach, thereby treating heartburn, stomach upset, and indigestion. Magnesium oxide treats constipation by drawing water into the intestine and stimulating bowel movement.

Directions for Use

Tablet/Capsule: Swallow the tablet/capsule as a whole with a glass of water. Do not chew, crush or break it. Liquid/Suspension: Shake the bottle well before use. Take the prescribed dose by mouth using the measuring cup provided by the pack. Powder/granules: Dissolve the powder in a prescribed amount of water. Injection: A healthcare professional will administer the injection. Do not self-administer.

Storage

Store in a cool and dry place away from sunlight

Side Effects of MAGNESIUM OXIDE

  • Diarrhoea
  • Cramps

In-Depth Precautions and Warning

Drug Warnings

Do not take MAGNESIUM OXIDE if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Consult your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Inform your doctor if you have intestinal problems, kidney, heart, or liver disease before starting MAGNESIUM OXIDE. Because it’s unclear whether MAGNESIUM OXIDE affects driving abilities, don’t drive or operate machinery if you’re experiencing any symptoms that make it difficult to concentrate or react. Avoid drinking alcohol while taking MAGNESIUM OXIDE because it may cause unpleasant side effects.

Drug Interactions

Drug-Drug Interactions: MAGNESIUM OXIDE may interact with medications used to reduce pain, fever, or inflammation (e.g. aspirin), minerals (e.g. calcium/vitamin D), medicines used to treat depression and anxiety (e.g. duloxetine), medicine used to treat and prevent iron deficiency anaemia (e.g. ferrous sulfate), anti-hypertensive medicines (e.g. metoprolol), vitamins (e.g. cholecalciferol), and medicine is used to treat anxiety disorders and panic disorder (e.g. alprazolam).

Drug-Food Interactions: Consuming alcohol along with MAGNESIUM OXIDE is not advisable as it may cause unpleasant side effects, or you may become more sensitive to the effects of alcohol.

Drug-Disease Interactions: Inform your doctor if you suffer from renal dysfunction or other medical conditions.

Safety Advice

  • Safety WarningALCOHOLCONSULT YOUR DOCTORConsuming alcohol along with MAGNESIUM OXIDE is not advisable as it may cause unpleasant side effects, or you also may become more sensitive to the effects of alcohol.
  • Safety WarningPREGNANCYPlease consult your doctor before taking MAGNESIUM OXIDE if you are pregnant or planning to conceive. MAGNESIUM OXIDE should be used only if the benefits outweigh the risk in a pregnant woman.
  • Safety WarningBREAST FEEDINGMAGNESIUM OXIDE is excreted into breast milk when used by a breastfeeding woman. Please consult your doctor before taking MAGNESIUM OXIDE if you are breastfeeding.
  • Safety WarningDRIVINGIt is not known whether MAGNESIUM OXIDE alters the ability to drive, so do not drive or operate machinery if you experience any symptoms that affect your ability to concentrate and react.
  • Safety WarningLIVERMAGNESIUM OXIDE should be used with caution in patients with liver impairment/liver disease. Please consult your doctor. Your doctor will prescribe only if the benefits outweigh the risks.
  • Safety WarningKIDNEYMAGNESIUM OXIDE should be used with caution in patients with kidney impairment/kidney disease. Please consult your doctor. Your doctor will prescribe only if the benefits outweigh the risks.

Habit Forming

No

Diet & Lifestyle Advise

  • Manage your stress, eat well, drink enough of water, exercise regularly, and sleep well.
  • Try maintaining a balanced diet, which includes fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Stay hydrated, drink enough water and fluids.
  • Exercise regularly, and stay fit.
  • Get enough sleep.
  • Eat food rich in fibre such as whole-wheat bread, oatmeal, flaxseed, nuts, beans, lentils, fruits (berries, apples, oranges, bananas, pears, figs), and vegetables (broccoli, spinach, sweet potatoes, avocados).

Special Advise

  • Your doctor may advise you to get regular blood tests to check the amount of magnesium in your blood.
  • Your blood calcium levels need to be regularly monitored while taking MAGNESIUM OXIDE.

Patients Concern

Disease/Condition Glossary

Hypomagnesaemia: It is a condition that occurs when a person has abnormally low blood levels of magnesium. This occurs when a person does not get enough magnesium through diet, or he/she is unable to absorb magnesium properly. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, weakness, personality changes, tremor, fatigue, seizures, irregular heartbeat, and high blood pressure.

Constipation: It refers to infrequent bowel movements in which stools are often dry, painful, and hard to pass. Constipation is a condition in which the person has fewer than three bowel movements in a week. However, bowel patterns may vary from person to person. Symptoms include bloating, abdominal pain, and feeling as if the bowel movement is incomplete.

Acidity: The stomach is usually protected from the acid by a mucous layer. In some cases, due to excess acid production, the mucous layer gets irritated or eroded, which leads to complications like heartburn, stomach upset, and acid indigestion. Symptoms include heartburn, sour or bitter taste in the mouth, and difficulty swallowing.

Is magnesium oxide gluten free?​

Magnesium Oxide is gluten free. Magnesium Oxide should be safe for patients with celiac and other gluten-related disorders.

Fig’s dietitians reviewed this note on magnesium oxide. Check ingredients faster with the free Fig app!

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Check if any food or ingredient has gluten​

Simply scan a food product with Fig. The app flags ingredients that may contain gluten. Click any ingredient like magnesium oxide to read more about its likely gluten content.

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What to consider when starting a Gluten Free diet​

Millions of people are now avoiding gluten. Some people avoid gluten because they have a gluten-related disorder like Celiac Disease. Others avoid gluten because it helps them feel their best. If you’re not sure how to get started, check out our Guide to a Gluten-Free Diet.

Gluten is found naturally in ingredients like wheat, barley, and rye. It may also be found in other grains like oats due to cross-contamination. If you scan a food product with Fig, it will tell you if an ingredient like magnesium oxide naturally has gluten or if it may be at risk of cross-contamination.

When searching for gluten free foods, look for a certified gluten free logo. In the United States, this means the product has less than 20 parts per million gluten. Also check allergen statements for the presence of wheat.

We’ve done our best to ensure this note on magnesium oxide is accurate. When starting a gluten free diet, it’s generally best to work with a trained dietitian or clinician.

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