Food With Potassium And Iron

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Turn to this go-to guide for quick, delicious recipes that are packed with Food With Potassium And Iron. Many of the foods that you already eat contain potassium. The foods listed below are high in potassium. If you need to boost the amount of potassium in your diet, make healthy food choices by picking items below to add to your menu.

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Food With Potassium And Iron

Many fresh fruits and vegetables are rich in potassium:

  • Bananas, oranges, cantaloupe, honeydew, apricots, grapefruit (some dried fruits, such as prunes, raisins, and dates, are also high in potassium)
  • Cooked spinach
  • Cooked broccoli
  • Potatoes
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Mushrooms
  • Peas
  • Cucumbers
  • Zucchini
  • Pumpkins
  • Leafy greens

Juice from potassium-rich fruit is also a good choice:

  • Orange juice
  • Tomato juice
  • Prune juice
  • Apricot juice
  • Grapefruit juice

Certain dairy products, such as milk and yogurt, are high in potassium (low-fat or fat-free is best).

Some fish contain potassium:

  • Tuna
  • Halibut
  • Cod
  • Trout
  • Rockfish

Beans or legumes that are high in potassium include:

  • Lima beans
  • Pinto beans
  • Kidney beans
  • Soybeans
  • Lentils

Other foods that are rich in potassium include:

  • Salt substitutes (read labels to check potassium levels)
  • Molasses
  • Nuts
  • Meat and poultry
  • Brown and wild rice
  • Bran cereal
  • Whole-wheat bread and pasta

Foods That Are High in Potassium

Ready to boost your intake? Taylor suggests adding these potassium powerhouses to your diet.

1. Potatoes

Spuds are a smart choice — just leave the nutrient-rich skins intact. A medium baked potato with the skin on contains more than 900 milligrams of potassium. A sweet potato with skin? More than 500 milligrams.

2. Legumes

Beans are a good source of potassium. White beans and adzuki beans have around 600 milligrams per half-cup serving. Pinto beans, navy beans, lima beans and Great Northern beans all have more than 350 milligrams per half-cup. Soybeans (aka edamame, aka delicious) and lentils are also good sources of potassium.

3. Juices

People often reach for whole fruit over juices since whole fruits are a good source of fiber. But don’t rule out juice completely. Prune juice and carrot juice both pack a serious potassium punch: About 689 milligrams for a cup of carrot juice and more than 700 milligrams for the same amount of prune juice.

Orange juice and pomegranate juice are also good picks, each containing around 500 milligrams per cup. Taylor recommends watching your portions though because of the sugar content.

4. Seafood

Popular fish like salmon, mackerel, halibut, tuna and snapper all have more than 400 milligrams of potassium in a 3-ounce filet. Chowder more your thing? Just 3 ounces of canned clams will get you upwards of 500 milligrams.

5. Leafy greens

Popeye had the right idea. A half-cup serving of cooked spinach contains up to 400 milligrams of potassium. The same amount of Swiss chard has more than 450 milligrams and beet greens more than 600 milligrams.

6. Dairy

You know dairy is a super source of calcium. Turns out, it’s a great source of potassium, too. One cup of low-fat or skim milk contains about 350 to 380 milligrams of potassium. And plain yogurt will net you more than 500 milligrams per cup (not to mention protein and healthy probiotics). 

7. Tomatoes

A cup of chopped tomatoes delivers more than 400 milligrams of potassium, while a cup of tomato juice or tomato puree more than 500 milligrams. Concentrated tomato paste is even richer in the mineral, with more than 650 milligrams per quarter-cup (marinara sauce, anyone?).

8. Bananas

These yellow fruits may be the best-known source of potassium. Indeed, one medium banana contains about 422 milligrams. Banana’s cousin, the plantain, is also a potassium-rich pick.

9. Other fruits

Bananas aren’t the only fruits filled with potassium. Cantaloupe, dates, nectarines and oranges all have more than 250 milligrams per half-cup serving. Dried peaches, apricots, prunes and raisins are good sources as well.

10. Avocadoes

As if you needed another reason to reach for the guacamole, a half-cup serving of creamy avocado contains about 364 milligrams of potassium.

From fruit salad to avocado toast, a fancy fish dinner to a bowl of tomatoey spaghetti, there are so many great ways to get your fill of potassium. Your health — and your taste buds — will thank you.

Healthy Foods That Are High in Iron

Iron is a mineral that serves several important functions, its main one being to carry oxygen throughout your body as a part of red blood cells

It’s an essential nutrient, meaning you must get it from food. The Daily Value (DV) is 18 mg.

Interestingly, the amount of iron your body absorbs is partly based on how much you have stored.

A deficiency can occur if your intake is too low to replace the amount you lose every day

Iron deficiency can cause anemia and lead to symptoms like fatigue. Menstruating women who don’t consume iron-rich foods are at a particularly high risk of deficiency.

Luckily, there are plenty of good food choices to help you meet your daily
iron needs

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1. Shellfish

Shellfish is tasty and nutritious. All shellfish is high in iron, but clams, oysters, and mussels are particularly good sources.

For instance, a 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving of clams may contain up to 3 mg of iron, which is 17% of the DV

However, the iron content of clams is highly variable, and some types may contain much lower amounts .

The iron in shellfish is heme iron, which your body absorbs more easily than the non-heme iron found in plants.

A 3.5-ounce serving of clams also provides 26 grams of protein, 24% of the DV for vitamin C, and a whopping 4,125% of the DV for vitamin B12.

In fact, all shellfish is high in nutrients and has been shown to increase the level of heart-healthy HDL cholesterol in your blood .

Although there are legitimate concerns about mercury and toxins in certain types of fish and shellfish, the benefits of consuming seafood far outweigh the risks .

SUMMARY

A 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving of clams provides 17% of the DV for iron. Shellfish is also rich in many other nutrients and may increase HDL (good) cholesterol levels in your blood.

2. Spinach

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Spinach provides many health benefits but very few calories.

About 3.5 ounces (100 grams) of raw spinach contain 2.7 mg of iron, or 15% of the DV (7).

Although this is non-heme iron, which isn’t absorbed very well, spinach is also rich in vitamin C. This is important since vitamin C significantly boosts iron absorption .

Spinach is also rich in antioxidants called carotenoids, which may reduce your risk of cancer, decrease inflammation, and protect your eyes from disease .

Consuming spinach and other leafy greens with fat helps your body absorb the carotenoids, so make sure to eat a healthy fat like olive oil with your spinach .

SUMMARY

Spinach provides 15% of the DV for iron per serving, along with several vitamins and minerals. It also contains important antioxidants.

3. Liver and other organ meats

Organ meats are extremely nutritious. Popular types include liver, kidneys, brain, and heart — all of which are high in iron.

For example, a 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving of beef liver contains 6.5 mg of iron, or 36% of the DV .

Organ meats are also high in protein and rich in B vitamins, copper, and selenium.

Liver is especially high in vitamin A, providing an impressive 1,049% of the DV per 3.5-ounce serving.

What’s more, organ meats are among the best sources of choline, an important nutrient for brain and liver health that many people don’t get enough of .

SUMMARY

Organ meats are good sources of iron, and liver contains 36% of the DV per serving. Organ meats are also rich in many other nutrients, such as selenium, vitamin A, and choline.

4. Legumes

Some of the most common types of legumes are beans, lentils, chickpeas, peas, and soybeans.

They’re a great source of iron, especially for vegetarians. One cup (198 grams) of cooked lentils contains 6.6 mg, which is 37% of the DV .

Beans like black beans, navy beans, and kidney beans can all help easily bump up your iron intake.

In fact, a half-cup (86-gram) serving of cooked black beans provides around 1.8 grams of iron, or 10% of the DV .

Legumes are also a good source of folate, magnesium, and potassium.

What’s more, studies have shown that beans and other legumes can reduce inflammation in people with diabetes. Legumes can also decrease heart disease risk for people with metabolic syndrome .

Additionally, legumes may help you lose weight. They’re very high in soluble fiber, which can increase feelings of fullness and reduce calorie intake .

In one study, a high fiber diet containing beans was shown to be as effective as a low carb diet for weight loss .

To maximize iron absorption, consume legumes with foods high in vitamin C, such as tomatoes, greens, or citrus fruits.

SUMMARY

One cup (198 grams) of cooked lentils provides 37% of the DV for iron. Legumes are also high in folate, magnesium, potassium, and fiber and may even aid weight loss.

5. Red meat

Red meat is satisfying and nutritious.

A 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving of ground beef contains 2.7 mg of iron, which is 15% of the DV .

Meat is also rich in protein, zinc, selenium, and several B vitamins .

Researchers have suggested that iron deficiency may be less likely in people who eat meat, poultry, and fish on a regular basis .

In fact, red meat is probably the single most easily accessible source of heme iron, potentially making it an important food for people who are prone to anemia.

In one study looking at changes in iron stores after aerobic exercise, women who consumed meat retained iron better than those who took iron supplements .

SUMMARY

One serving of ground beef contains 15% of the DV for iron and is one of the most easily accessible sources of heme iron. It’s also rich in B vitamins, zinc, selenium, and high quality protein.

Iron-Rich Foods

Spinach may not give you superhuman strength to fight off villains like Popeye’s nemesis Bluto, but this leafy green and other foods containing iron can help you fight a different type of enemy — iron-deficiency anemia.

Iron-deficiency anemia, the most common form of anemia, is a decrease in the number of red blood cells caused by too little iron. Without sufficient iron, your body can’t produce enough hemoglobin, a substance in red blood cells that makes it possible for them to carry oxygen to the body’s tissues. As a result, you may feel weak, tired, and irritable.

About 20% of women, 50% of pregnant women, and 3% of men do not have enough iron in their body. The solution, in many cases, is to consume more foods high in iron.

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Vitamin And Mineral-Rich Foods We Should All Be Eating

Woman feeding orange to her son
Woman feeding orange to her son
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Zinc, magnesium, cyanocobalamin, iron, potassium. They might seem like foreign, chemistry elements, but making sure we consume enough of these nutrients is incredibly important for our bodies to function normally and help prevent disease.

Despite what the endless aisle of supplements say in the chemist, getting nutrients from food is far more beneficial for us than in tablet form. These essential vitamins and minerals are found in everyday foods and it’s important to make eating these foods a priority.

“I like to think of supplements just as the word suggests: to supplement the diet, if needed,” accredited practising dietician Chloe McLeod told The Huffington Post Australia. “If someone has specific needs, or can’t get a certain nutrient in their diet because of intolerances or lifestyle choices, then supplements can be useful.”

“But if you can get them from your food there’s going to be better outcomes associated with that.”

“If you eat a variety of different foods each day — which are fresh, healthy, non-processed — it’s going to give your body the nutrients that it needs to function at its best.”

Zinc

Zinc is known for its immune-boosting properties and also helps with digestive function and skin healing.

Hero foods: “One of the richest sources of zinc is oysters, but it’s also found in red meat, spinach, cashews and pumpkin seeds. But the best source by far is oysters,” McLeod said.

Magnesium

Having enough magnesium is important for energy production, muscle growth, healthy bones, transmission of nerve impulses and regulating body temperature.

Hero foods: “The best sources of magnesium are leafy greens, nuts, seeds and fish. Eating a combination of those things will help provide enough magnesium,” McLeod said.

Vitamin K

Vitamin K is a nutrient which helps regulates normal blood clotting (such as when you graze your knee) and assists in transporting calcium throughout the body.

“Vitamin K is really important for bone health and is also anti-inflammatory,” McLeod said.

Hero foods: “The best sources of this are your leafy greens, again — they come up pretty regularly,” McLeod said. “So things like broccoli, spinach and kale are all really rich in vitamin K.”

Vitamin C

The benefits of vitamin C include immune protection and healthy skin, as well as protection against cardiovascular disease.

Hero foods: “Foods rich in vitamin C include kiwi fruit, oranges, dark leafy greens, capsicum and lemons,” McLeod told Huffington Post Australia. “Lemons are also known for its antibacterial properties.”

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Iron

Iron is an essential mineral that aids transporting oxygen in the blood. If we become iron-deficient, it means we are lacking the optimum amount of oxygen-carrying blood cells, which can cause tiredness, weakness, dizziness and pale skin.

Hero foods: “Red meat is one of the richest sources of iron. Some other high iron, non-meat sources are things like sesame seeds, nori (the seaweed used in sushi) and cashews. So if you’re not wanting to get iron from red meat, they are all good sources,” McLeod said.

Potassium

Potassium is important for normal heart, brain, muscle and nerve function, as well as for helping to regulate fluid balance in the body.

Hero foods: “I think bananas are the most well known high-potassium source and it’s a really great source of that. Other ones I would be looking at are dark leafy greens, Greek yoghurt, avocados and mushrooms — they’re all really good sources of potassium, as well.”

Calcium

“Calcium is important for bone health, as well as heart and muscle health,” McLeod said.

Hero foods: “Calcium is one that is really rich in dairy foods, so milk, yoghurt and cheese. It’s also found in foods like sesame seeds, almonds and broccoli, which are all really good sources.”

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Vitamin D

Vitamin D is important for maintaining healthy bones and teeth as it helps our bodies to absorb calcium and phosphorus.

“Vitamin D is a funny one. It’s one which actually develops in your skin when you’re in the sun. Particularly going into winter, we’re going into the period where vitamin D deficiencies start to go up a little bit,” McLeod told HuffPost Australia.

Hero foods: “It is naturally found in oily fish, or sometimes it will be fortified into some dairy products,” McLeod said.

“One of the best ways to get vitamin D is through mushrooms that have been left in the sun. If you eat 100 grams of mushrooms that have been left in the sun for about an hour, it will give you around 20 percent of your daily needs of vitamin D.

“The reaction that happens in the skin of the mushroom is the same as when it happens in your own skin.”

B Vitamins

The B-group vitamins include B1 (thiamin), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenic acid), B6 (pyridoxine), B7 (biotin), B9 (folate) and vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin). These vitamins are essential for various metabolic processes and need to be consumed regularly in the diet as our bodies cannot store them.

Hero foods: “Again, leafy greens are going to be your best sources of that. They are also found in legumes, citrus fruits, seeds, cereals, chicken and some seafood, as well,” McLeod said.

“Vitamin B is found in a lot of different things and it’s one that is really easy to get in if you’re eating a varied, healthy diet.”

B12 is particularly important to consume enough of as it helps with nerve function, red blood cell production and mental ability.

Hero foods: “B12 is found more in animal products — it’s not found in plant products. You can also get B12-fortified products, including cereals,” McLeod said.

“With B12, it is one that we need to be a bit more concerned about, especially for those who are vegetarian or vegan. Using the fortified foods is a good idea.”

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