Healthy Lunch Ideas For High Blood Pressure

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Today is your lucky day because I’m about to deliver some healthy lunch ideas for high blood pressure. The reason you’re reading this article isn’t wrong. You have a problem of having too much high blood pressure and you need a cure for that.  As long as you read my article carefully, there will not be any problems for you to choose the best method for lowering your high blood pressure.

Healthy Lunch Ideas For High Blood Pressure

A balanced diet and healthy lifestyle can contribute considerably to managing high blood pressure. Here are some lunch recipe ideas that are hypertension-friendly.

New Delhi: The unhealthy increase in levels of blood flow in the blood vessels leads to high blood pressure. According to the World Health Organization, 1 out of 5 adult individuals suffers from the problem of high blood pressure. It is a popular condition that is responsible for the deaths of about 9.4 million people, globally. This condition is more prevalent in countries with low income as compared to countries with high income. Several factors, including genes, environment, underlying health issues, hormonal imbalances, and physical inactivity can lead to the development of hypertension. The common symptoms include chest pain, headaches, shortness in breath, etc.

To deal with hypertension, one must practice a healthy lifestyle along with a healthy diet. A hypertension-friendly diet will include vegetables, fruits, lean proteins, and whole grains. Here are some healthy lunch recipe ideas that you can go for.

Lunch recipes for high blood pressure

Broccoli salad: Broccoli has been a popular superfood. If you are suffering from high blood pressure, broccoli can help you lower it by promoting the relaxation of the blood vessels. The ingredients required for this recipe are:

  • Broccoli (8 cups)
  • Sunflower seeds (1/4 cup)
  • Sugar (2 tbsp)
  • Seasoned rice vinegar (3 tbsp)
  • Canola oil (3 tbsp)
  • Thinly slices green onions (1/2 cup)
  • Dried cranberries (1/2 cup)

This recipe serves 10 people and the total time for preparation of this recipe is 25 minutes. The method of preparation of this recipe is as follows:

  • Take a bowl and mix the cranberries, green onions and broccoli in it.
  • Take another bowl and blend vinegar, oil and sugar in it.
  • Mix the ingredients of the two bowls.
  • Sprinkle the sunflower seeds over the salad.
  • Serve.

Quinoa chicken bowl: This protein-rich bowl contains chicken and quinoa. This lunch recipe holds immense potential and can help you manage your blood pressure, as well as your triglyceride levels. The ingredients required for this recipe are:

  • Trimmed chicken, skinless and boneless (1 pound)
  • Ground pepper (1/4 tsp)
  • Olive oil (4 tbsp)
  • Roaster red peppers (1 7-ounce jar)
  • 1 crushed garlic clove
  • Almonds (1/4 cup)
  • Salt (1/4 tsp)
  • Feta cheese (1/4 cup)
  • Paprika (1 tsp)
  • Diced cucumber (1 cup)
  • Finely chopped parsley (2 tbsp)
  • Cooked quinoa (2 cups)
  • Finely chopped red onions (1/4 cup)
  • Ground cumin (1/2 tsp)
  • Pitted and chopped kalamata olives (2 cups)

This recipe serves 4 people and the total time for preparation of this recipe is 30 minutes. The method of preparation of this recipe is as follows:

  • Preheat the broiler to high and rim a baking sheet with foil.
  • Arrange the chicken on the baking sheet and sprinkle with salt.
  • Broil the chicken for at least 14 minutes to 18 minutes. Bring the chicken to a cutting board and slice.
  • Prepare a smooth puree of peppers, garlic, cumin, almonds, paprika and 2 tablespoons oil in a food processor.
  • Mix red onion, olives, 2 tablespoons of oil and quinoa in a bowl.
  • Arrange the ingredients on a plate into divided sections by placing chicken, red pepper sauce, cucumber and quinoa mixture.
  • Sprinkle parsley and feta cheese on it and serve.

Salmon lentil salad: Salads are easy to prepare and could be a great recipe idea for lunch. This recipe contains salmon which is a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids. This can help to lower blood pressure. The ingredients required for this recipe are:

  • Salt (1/4 tsp)
  • Dijon mustard (2 tsp)
  • Diced cucumber (1 cup)
  • Lemon juice (1/3 cup)
  • Olive oil (1/3 cup)
  • Chopped dill (1/3 cup)
  • Ground pepper
  • 1 diced and seeded red bell pepper
  • Finely chopped red onion (1/2 cup)
  • Brown lentils, cooked (3 cups)
  • Cooked salmon, flaked (1 1/2 cups)

This recipe serves 6 people and the total time for preparation of this recipe is 30 minutes. The method of preparation of this recipe is as follows:

  • Take a large bowl and whisk mustard, pepper, salt, dill and lemon juice in it.
  • Add oil to it and whisk again.
  • Add bell pepper, lentils, salmon, cucumber, and onions to the bowl and toss to combine.
  • Serve.
  • Follow this plan for a week of beginner heart-healthy recipes to lower your blood pressure and improve your health.
  • In this 7-day high-blood pressure diet plan for beginners, we map out a week of delicious recipes tailored for beginners. We keep things super simple by repeating several breakfasts and lunches, plus kept dinner easy by choosing recipes with short ingredient lists and simple steps (think one-pot recipes!). The goal is to enjoy cooking more meals at home and reap the health benefits without feeling like you’re spending too much time in the kitchen.

    See More: Healthy High-Blood Pressure Diet Recipes

    What Causes High-Blood Pressure?

    It’s difficult to say what causes high-blood pressure outright, likely there’s a few factors at play. Genetics and family history, sedentary lifestyle and a diet that’s particularly high in sodium and processed foods and low in fruits and vegetables, can all play a role in raising blood pressure.

    How to Lower High-Blood Pressure

    While we can’t control our genetics, we can increase our exercise and change up our diets to support a healthy heart. Aim for a brisk walk, or any other form of cardio exercise, for at least 30 minutes most days of the week to help improve your heart health and lower your blood pressure.

    Nutrition-wise, lowering your sodium intake, namely by reducing processed foods like frozen dinners and fast foods, can help lower blood pressure. Plus, increasing intake of foods rich in potassium, like most fruits and vegetables, salmon, beans and dairy, can also help lower your blood pressure.

    If you’re overweight, losing weight can positively improve blood pressure, so we set this plan at 1,500 calories, which is a level where most people will lose weight. We also included modifications for 1,200 or 2,000 calories a day, depending on your needs.

    How to Shop for Foods to Lower High-Blood Pressure:

    When you’re shopping for foods to lower your blood pressure, there’s a few key steps that can make a difference. While you may have heard the common advice to shop the perimeter of the store, it’s important to know that there are many healthy foods for high-blood pressure located in the inner aisles. Low-sodium canned beans, dried beans and whole grains like quinoa and brown rice are all in the inner aisles. Plus, you’ll find frozen fruits and vegetables, which are just as healthy as fresh and a great option to include on your shopping list.

    When buying canned foods, like beans or tomatoes, look for phrases like no-salt-added, unsalted or low-sodium. As a general rule, look at the nutrition label and try to limit foods that contain more than 20% Daily Value of sodium per serving. As much as possible, try to skip processed meats (like hot dogs or sausage), as well as frozen meals like frozen pizza or T.V. dinners. And be sure to double check the nutrition label on marinades and sauces, as these can be a sneaky high source of sodium.

    The bottom-line—the best way to reduce your salt intake is to cook more meals at home. If you find reading the labels overwhelming, start by preparing more homemade meals and try to increase your fruit and vegetable intake. These two steps can make a huge difference.

    Healthy Foods for High Blood Pressure:

    Aim for foods rich in potassium, magnesium and calcium to lower your blood pressure

    • Banana
    • Oranges
    • Apricots
    • Melon, like cantaloupe, honeydew and watermelon
    • Dark leafy greens, like spinach and kale
    • Potatoes
    • Sweet Potatoes
    • Winter Squash, like acorn or butternut
    • Beets
    • Beans and legumes
    • Yogurt
    • Kefir
    • Salmon
    • Almonds, walnuts and other nuts and seeds

    How to Meal-Prep Your Week of Meals:

    1. Prepare Vegan Superfood Grain Bowls to have for lunch on Days 2 through 5.

    Day 1

    Garlic Butter-Roasted Salmon with Potatoes & Asparagus

    Breakfast (309 calories)

    • 1 serving Old-Fashioned Oatmeal
    • 1/4 cup raspberries
    • 3 Tbsp. chopped walnuts

    A.M. Snack (131 calories)

    • 1 large pear

    Lunch (455 calories)

    • 1 serving White Bean & Veggie Salad
    • 1 medium apple

    P.M. Snack (62 calories)

    • 1 medium orange

    Dinner (522 calories)

    • 1 serving Garlic Butter-Roasted Salmon with Potatoes & Asparagus

    Daily Totals: 1,479 calories, 55 g protein, 166 g carbohydrates, 39 g fiber, 75 g fat, 14 g saturated fat, 3,525 mg potassium, 875 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Omit the walnuts at breakfast and change the P.M. snack to 1/4 cup sliced cucumbers.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Increase to 4 Tbsp. chopped walnuts at breakfast plus add 1/3 cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds to A.M. snack and 1/3 cup dried walnut halves to P.M. snack.

    Day 2

    Chicken Hummus Bowls

    Breakfast (309 calories)

    • 1 serving Old-Fashioned Oatmeal
    • 1/4 cup raspberries
    • 3 Tbsp. chopped walnuts

    A.M. Snack (148 calories)

    • 1 cup non-fat plain Greek yogurt
    • 1/4 cup blackberries

    Lunch (381 calories)

    • 1 serving Vegan Superfood Grain Bowls

    P.M. Snack (186 calories)

    • 10 dry-roasted unsalted almonds
    • 2 cups cantaloupe, cubed

    Dinner (485 calories)

    • 1 serving Chicken Hummus Bowls

    Daily Totals: 1,509 calories, 85 g protein, 144 g carbohydrates, 36 g fiber, 74 g fat, 10 g saturated fat, 3,569 mg potassium, 1,186 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Omit the walnuts at breakfast and the almonds at the P.M. snack plus reduce to 1/2 cup yogurt at the A.M. snack.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Increase to 2 servings Old-Fashioned Oatmeal at breakfast, add 1 slice wheat toast with 1 Tbsp. almond butter to A.M. snack and increase to 1/3 cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds at P.M. snack.

    Day 3

    Vegan Superfood Buddha Bowls

    Breakfast (278 calories)

    • 1 cup non-fat plain Greek yogurt
    • 1/3 cup blueberries
    • 3 Tbsp. slivered almonds

    A.M. Snack (72 calories)

    • 1 1/3 cup cantaloupe, cubed

    Lunch (381 calories)

    • 1 serving Vegan Superfood Grain Bowls

    P.M. Snack (321 calories)

    • 1 medium banana
    • 1/3 cup dried walnut halves

    Dinner (440 calories)

    • 1 serving Baked Eggs in Tomato Sauce with Kale
    • 1-oz. slice whole-wheat baguette

    Daily Totals: 1,492 calories, 76 g protein, 153 g carbohydrates, 31 g fiber, 73 g fat, 9 g saturated fat, 3,553 mg potassium, 1,175 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Reduce to 1 Tbsp. slivered almonds at breakfast and omit the walnuts at the P.M. snack.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Add 1 whole-wheat English muffin with 1 1/2 Tbsp. almond butter to breakfast and 1 serving Guacamole Chopped Salad to dinner.

    Day 4

    5486621.jpg

    Breakfast (278 calories)

    • 1 cup non-fat plain Greek yogurt
    • 1/3 cup blueberries
    • 3 Tbsp. slivered almonds

    A.M. Snack (318 calories)

    • 1 large banana
    • 2 Tbsp. almond butter

    Lunch (381 calories)

    • 1 serving Vegan Superfood Grain Bowls

    P.M. Snack (84 calories)

    • 10 dried apricot halves

    Dinner (429 calories)

    • 1 serving Chicken & Kale Taco Salad with Jalapeño-Avocado Ranch

    Meal-Prep Tip: To prepare for dinner tomorrow, soak 1 pound dried cannellini beans in water overnight and gather all ingredients so you’re able to start the slow-cooker on low for 7-8 hours in the morning so the Slow-Cooker Chicken & White Bean Stew is ready in time for dinner.

    Daily Totals: 1,490 calories, 83 g protein, 149 g carbohydrates, 35 g fiber, 71 g fat, 11 g saturated fat, 3,520 mg potassium, 754 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Reduce to 1 Tbsp. slivered almonds at breakfast and omit the almond butter at the A.M. snack.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Add 1 medium orange to lunch, 1/3 cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds P.M. snack and 1 serving Everything Bagel Avocado Toast to dinner.

    Day 5

    Slow-Cooker Chicken White Bean Stew

    Breakfast (309 calories)

    • 1 serving Old-Fashioned Oatmeal
    • 1/4 cup raspberries
    • 3 Tbsp. chopped walnuts

    A.M. Snack (318 calories)

    • 1 large banana
    • 2 Tbsp. almond butter

    Lunch (381 calories)

    • 1 serving Vegan Superfood Grain Bowls

    P.M. Snack (8 calories)

    • 1/2 cup sliced cucumber

    Dinner (493 calories)

    • 1 serving Slow-Cooker Chicken & White Bean Stew

    Meal-Prep Tip: Reserve 2 servings Slow-Cooker Chicken & White Bean Stew to have for lunch on Days 6 & 7.

    Daily Totals: 1,509 calories, 78 g protein, 170 g carbohydrates, 55 g fiber, 65 g fat, 10 g saturated fat, 3,721 mg potassium, 935 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Reduce to 1 Tbsp. chopped walnuts at breakfast and omit the almonds at the A.M. snack.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Increase to 4 Tbsp. chopped walnuts at breakfast, increase to 3 Tbsp. almond butter at A.M. snack, increase to 1 cup sliced cucumber and add 1/4 cup hummus to P.M. snack plus add 1 serving Guacamole Chopped Salad to dinner.

    Day 6

    Coconut-Curry Chicken Cutlets

    Breakfast (278 calories)

    • 1 cup non-fat plain Greek yogurt
    • 1/3 cup blueberries
    • 3 Tbsp. slivered almonds

    A.M. Snack (90 calories)

    • 1 2/3 cup cantaloupe, cubed

    Lunch (493 calories)

    • 1 serving Slow-Cooker Chicken & White Bean Stew

    P.M. Snack (116 calories)

    • 1 large apple

    Dinner (536 calories)

    • 1 serving Coconut-Curry Chicken Cutlets
    • 2 cups mixed greens
    • 1 serving Citrus Vinaigrette

    Daily Totals: 1,513 calories, 108 g protein, 158 g carbohydrates, 44 g fiber, 54 g fat, 12 g saturated fat, 3,550 mg potassium, 1,029 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Omit the almonds at breakfast, reduce the cantaloupe to 3/4 cup at A.M. snack and omit the mixed greens with Citrus Vinaigrette at dinner.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Add 1/3 cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds to A.M. snack and add 2 Tbsp. almond butter to P.M. snack.

    Day 7

    charred shrimp

    Breakfast (309 calories)

    • 1 serving Old-Fashioned Oatmeal
    • 1/4 cup raspberries
    • 3 Tbsp. chopped walnuts

    A.M. Snack (131 calories)

    • 1 large pear

    Lunch (493 calories)

    • 1 serving Slow-Cooker Chicken & White Bean Stew

    P.M. Snack (121 calories)

    • 1 large banana

    Dinner (429 calories)

    • 1 serving Charred Shrimp, Pesto & Quinoa Bowls

    Daily Totals: 1,484 calories, 86 g protein, 189 g carbohydrates, 53 g fiber, 51 g fat, 9 g saturated fat, 3,507 mg potassium, 1,247 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Omit the walnuts at breakfast, change the A.M. snack to 1 clementine and change the P.M. snack to 1 medium apple.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Add 1/3 cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds to A.M. snack and add 2 1/2 Tbsp. almond butter to P.M. snack.

A balanced diet and healthy lifestyle can contribute considerably to managing high blood pressure. Here are some lunch recipe ideas that are hypertension-friendly.

New Delhi: The unhealthy increase in levels of blood flow in the blood vessels leads to high blood pressure. According to the World Health Organization, 1 out of 5 adult individuals suffers from the problem of high blood pressure. It is a popular condition that is responsible for the deaths of about 9.4 million people, globally. This condition is more prevalent in countries with low income as compared to countries with high income. Several factors, including genes, environment, underlying health issues, hormonal imbalances, and physical inactivity can lead to the development of hypertension. The common symptoms include chest pain, headaches, shortness in breath, etc.

To deal with hypertension, one must practice a healthy lifestyle along with a healthy diet. A hypertension-friendly diet will include vegetables, fruits, lean proteins, and whole grains. Here are some healthy lunch recipe ideas that you can go for.

Lunch recipes for high blood pressure

Broccoli salad: Broccoli has been a popular superfood. If you are suffering from high blood pressure, broccoli can help you lower it by promoting the relaxation of the blood vessels. The ingredients required for this recipe are:

  • Broccoli (8 cups)
  • Sunflower seeds (1/4 cup)
  • Sugar (2 tbsp)
  • Seasoned rice vinegar (3 tbsp)
  • Canola oil (3 tbsp)
  • Thinly slices green onions (1/2 cup)
  • Dried cranberries (1/2 cup)

This recipe serves 10 people and the total time for preparation of this recipe is 25 minutes. The method of preparation of this recipe is as follows:

  • Take a bowl and mix the cranberries, green onions and broccoli in it.
  • Take another bowl and blend vinegar, oil and sugar in it.
  • Mix the ingredients of the two bowls.
  • Sprinkle the sunflower seeds over the salad.
  • Serve.

Quinoa chicken bowl: This protein-rich bowl contains chicken and quinoa. This lunch recipe holds immense potential and can help you manage your blood pressure, as well as your triglyceride levels. The ingredients required for this recipe are:

  • Trimmed chicken, skinless and boneless (1 pound)
  • Ground pepper (1/4 tsp)
  • Olive oil (4 tbsp)
  • Roaster red peppers (1 7-ounce jar)
  • 1 crushed garlic clove
  • Almonds (1/4 cup)
  • Salt (1/4 tsp)
  • Feta cheese (1/4 cup)
  • Paprika (1 tsp)
  • Diced cucumber (1 cup)
  • Finely chopped parsley (2 tbsp)
  • Cooked quinoa (2 cups)
  • Finely chopped red onions (1/4 cup)
  • Ground cumin (1/2 tsp)
  • Pitted and chopped kalamata olives (2 cups)

This recipe serves 4 people and the total time for preparation of this recipe is 30 minutes. The method of preparation of this recipe is as follows:

  • Preheat the broiler to high and rim a baking sheet with foil.
  • Arrange the chicken on the baking sheet and sprinkle with salt.
  • Broil the chicken for at least 14 minutes to 18 minutes. Bring the chicken to a cutting board and slice.
  • Prepare a smooth puree of peppers, garlic, cumin, almonds, paprika and 2 tablespoons oil in a food processor.
  • Mix red onion, olives, 2 tablespoons of oil and quinoa in a bowl.
  • Arrange the ingredients on a plate into divided sections by placing chicken, red pepper sauce, cucumber and quinoa mixture.
  • Sprinkle parsley and feta cheese on it and serve.

Salmon lentil salad: Salads are easy to prepare and could be a great recipe idea for lunch. This recipe contains salmon which is a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids. This can help to lower blood pressure. The ingredients required for this recipe are:

  • Salt (1/4 tsp)
  • Dijon mustard (2 tsp)
  • Diced cucumber (1 cup)
  • Lemon juice (1/3 cup)
  • Olive oil (1/3 cup)
  • Chopped dill (1/3 cup)
  • Ground pepper
  • 1 diced and seeded red bell pepper
  • Finely chopped red onion (1/2 cup)
  • Brown lentils, cooked (3 cups)
  • Cooked salmon, flaked (1 1/2 cups)

This recipe serves 6 people and the total time for preparation of this recipe is 30 minutes. The method of preparation of this recipe is as follows:

  • Take a large bowl and whisk mustard, pepper, salt, dill and lemon juice in it.
  • Add oil to it and whisk again.
  • Add bell pepper, lentils, salmon, cucumber, and onions to the bowl and toss to combine.
  • Serve.
  • Follow this plan for a week of beginner heart-healthy recipes to lower your blood pressure and improve your health.
  • In this 7-day high-blood pressure diet plan for beginners, we map out a week of delicious recipes tailored for beginners. We keep things super simple by repeating several breakfasts and lunches, plus kept dinner easy by choosing recipes with short ingredient lists and simple steps (think one-pot recipes!). The goal is to enjoy cooking more meals at home and reap the health benefits without feeling like you’re spending too much time in the kitchen.

    See More: Healthy High-Blood Pressure Diet Recipes

    What Causes High-Blood Pressure?

    It’s difficult to say what causes high-blood pressure outright, likely there’s a few factors at play. Genetics and family history, sedentary lifestyle and a diet that’s particularly high in sodium and processed foods and low in fruits and vegetables, can all play a role in raising blood pressure.

    How to Lower High-Blood Pressure

    While we can’t control our genetics, we can increase our exercise and change up our diets to support a healthy heart. Aim for a brisk walk, or any other form of cardio exercise, for at least 30 minutes most days of the week to help improve your heart health and lower your blood pressure.

    Nutrition-wise, lowering your sodium intake, namely by reducing processed foods like frozen dinners and fast foods, can help lower blood pressure. Plus, increasing intake of foods rich in potassium, like most fruits and vegetables, salmon, beans and dairy, can also help lower your blood pressure.

    If you’re overweight, losing weight can positively improve blood pressure, so we set this plan at 1,500 calories, which is a level where most people will lose weight. We also included modifications for 1,200 or 2,000 calories a day, depending on your needs.

    How to Shop for Foods to Lower High-Blood Pressure:

    When you’re shopping for foods to lower your blood pressure, there’s a few key steps that can make a difference. While you may have heard the common advice to shop the perimeter of the store, it’s important to know that there are many healthy foods for high-blood pressure located in the inner aisles. Low-sodium canned beans, dried beans and whole grains like quinoa and brown rice are all in the inner aisles. Plus, you’ll find frozen fruits and vegetables, which are just as healthy as fresh and a great option to include on your shopping list.

    When buying canned foods, like beans or tomatoes, look for phrases like no-salt-added, unsalted or low-sodium. As a general rule, look at the nutrition label and try to limit foods that contain more than 20% Daily Value of sodium per serving. As much as possible, try to skip processed meats (like hot dogs or sausage), as well as frozen meals like frozen pizza or T.V. dinners. And be sure to double check the nutrition label on marinades and sauces, as these can be a sneaky high source of sodium.

    The bottom-line—the best way to reduce your salt intake is to cook more meals at home. If you find reading the labels overwhelming, start by preparing more homemade meals and try to increase your fruit and vegetable intake. These two steps can make a huge difference.

    Healthy Foods for High Blood Pressure:

    Aim for foods rich in potassium, magnesium and calcium to lower your blood pressure

    • Banana
    • Oranges
    • Apricots
    • Melon, like cantaloupe, honeydew and watermelon
    • Dark leafy greens, like spinach and kale
    • Potatoes
    • Sweet Potatoes
    • Winter Squash, like acorn or butternut
    • Beets
    • Beans and legumes
    • Yogurt
    • Kefir
    • Salmon
    • Almonds, walnuts and other nuts and seeds

    How to Meal-Prep Your Week of Meals:

    1. Prepare Vegan Superfood Grain Bowls to have for lunch on Days 2 through 5.

    Day 1

    Garlic Butter-Roasted Salmon with Potatoes & Asparagus

    Breakfast (309 calories)

    • 1 serving Old-Fashioned Oatmeal
    • 1/4 cup raspberries
    • 3 Tbsp. chopped walnuts

    A.M. Snack (131 calories)

    • 1 large pear

    Lunch (455 calories)

    • 1 serving White Bean & Veggie Salad
    • 1 medium apple

    P.M. Snack (62 calories)

    • 1 medium orange

    Dinner (522 calories)

    • 1 serving Garlic Butter-Roasted Salmon with Potatoes & Asparagus

    Daily Totals: 1,479 calories, 55 g protein, 166 g carbohydrates, 39 g fiber, 75 g fat, 14 g saturated fat, 3,525 mg potassium, 875 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Omit the walnuts at breakfast and change the P.M. snack to 1/4 cup sliced cucumbers.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Increase to 4 Tbsp. chopped walnuts at breakfast plus add 1/3 cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds to A.M. snack and 1/3 cup dried walnut halves to P.M. snack.

    Day 2

    Chicken Hummus Bowls

    Breakfast (309 calories)

    • 1 serving Old-Fashioned Oatmeal
    • 1/4 cup raspberries
    • 3 Tbsp. chopped walnuts

    A.M. Snack (148 calories)

    • 1 cup non-fat plain Greek yogurt
    • 1/4 cup blackberries

    Lunch (381 calories)

    • 1 serving Vegan Superfood Grain Bowls

    P.M. Snack (186 calories)

    • 10 dry-roasted unsalted almonds
    • 2 cups cantaloupe, cubed

    Dinner (485 calories)

    • 1 serving Chicken Hummus Bowls

    Daily Totals: 1,509 calories, 85 g protein, 144 g carbohydrates, 36 g fiber, 74 g fat, 10 g saturated fat, 3,569 mg potassium, 1,186 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Omit the walnuts at breakfast and the almonds at the P.M. snack plus reduce to 1/2 cup yogurt at the A.M. snack.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Increase to 2 servings Old-Fashioned Oatmeal at breakfast, add 1 slice wheat toast with 1 Tbsp. almond butter to A.M. snack and increase to 1/3 cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds at P.M. snack.

    Day 3

    Vegan Superfood Buddha Bowls

    Breakfast (278 calories)

    • 1 cup non-fat plain Greek yogurt
    • 1/3 cup blueberries
    • 3 Tbsp. slivered almonds

    A.M. Snack (72 calories)

    • 1 1/3 cup cantaloupe, cubed

    Lunch (381 calories)

    • 1 serving Vegan Superfood Grain Bowls

    P.M. Snack (321 calories)

    • 1 medium banana
    • 1/3 cup dried walnut halves

    Dinner (440 calories)

    • 1 serving Baked Eggs in Tomato Sauce with Kale
    • 1-oz. slice whole-wheat baguette

    Daily Totals: 1,492 calories, 76 g protein, 153 g carbohydrates, 31 g fiber, 73 g fat, 9 g saturated fat, 3,553 mg potassium, 1,175 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Reduce to 1 Tbsp. slivered almonds at breakfast and omit the walnuts at the P.M. snack.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Add 1 whole-wheat English muffin with 1 1/2 Tbsp. almond butter to breakfast and 1 serving Guacamole Chopped Salad to dinner.

    Day 4

    5486621.jpg

    Breakfast (278 calories)

    • 1 cup non-fat plain Greek yogurt
    • 1/3 cup blueberries
    • 3 Tbsp. slivered almonds

    A.M. Snack (318 calories)

    • 1 large banana
    • 2 Tbsp. almond butter

    Lunch (381 calories)

    • 1 serving Vegan Superfood Grain Bowls

    P.M. Snack (84 calories)

    • 10 dried apricot halves

    Dinner (429 calories)

    • 1 serving Chicken & Kale Taco Salad with Jalapeño-Avocado Ranch

    Meal-Prep Tip: To prepare for dinner tomorrow, soak 1 pound dried cannellini beans in water overnight and gather all ingredients so you’re able to start the slow-cooker on low for 7-8 hours in the morning so the Slow-Cooker Chicken & White Bean Stew is ready in time for dinner.

    Daily Totals: 1,490 calories, 83 g protein, 149 g carbohydrates, 35 g fiber, 71 g fat, 11 g saturated fat, 3,520 mg potassium, 754 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Reduce to 1 Tbsp. slivered almonds at breakfast and omit the almond butter at the A.M. snack.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Add 1 medium orange to lunch, 1/3 cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds P.M. snack and 1 serving Everything Bagel Avocado Toast to dinner.

    Day 5

    Slow-Cooker Chicken White Bean Stew

    Breakfast (309 calories)

    • 1 serving Old-Fashioned Oatmeal
    • 1/4 cup raspberries
    • 3 Tbsp. chopped walnuts

    A.M. Snack (318 calories)

    • 1 large banana
    • 2 Tbsp. almond butter

    Lunch (381 calories)

    • 1 serving Vegan Superfood Grain Bowls

    P.M. Snack (8 calories)

    • 1/2 cup sliced cucumber

    Dinner (493 calories)

    • 1 serving Slow-Cooker Chicken & White Bean Stew

    Meal-Prep Tip: Reserve 2 servings Slow-Cooker Chicken & White Bean Stew to have for lunch on Days 6 & 7.

    Daily Totals: 1,509 calories, 78 g protein, 170 g carbohydrates, 55 g fiber, 65 g fat, 10 g saturated fat, 3,721 mg potassium, 935 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Reduce to 1 Tbsp. chopped walnuts at breakfast and omit the almonds at the A.M. snack.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Increase to 4 Tbsp. chopped walnuts at breakfast, increase to 3 Tbsp. almond butter at A.M. snack, increase to 1 cup sliced cucumber and add 1/4 cup hummus to P.M. snack plus add 1 serving Guacamole Chopped Salad to dinner.

    Day 6

    Coconut-Curry Chicken Cutlets

    Breakfast (278 calories)

    • 1 cup non-fat plain Greek yogurt
    • 1/3 cup blueberries
    • 3 Tbsp. slivered almonds

    A.M. Snack (90 calories)

    • 1 2/3 cup cantaloupe, cubed

    Lunch (493 calories)

    • 1 serving Slow-Cooker Chicken & White Bean Stew

    P.M. Snack (116 calories)

    • 1 large apple

    Dinner (536 calories)

    • 1 serving Coconut-Curry Chicken Cutlets
    • 2 cups mixed greens
    • 1 serving Citrus Vinaigrette

    Daily Totals: 1,513 calories, 108 g protein, 158 g carbohydrates, 44 g fiber, 54 g fat, 12 g saturated fat, 3,550 mg potassium, 1,029 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Omit the almonds at breakfast, reduce the cantaloupe to 3/4 cup at A.M. snack and omit the mixed greens with Citrus Vinaigrette at dinner.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Add 1/3 cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds to A.M. snack and add 2 Tbsp. almond butter to P.M. snack.

    Day 7

    charred shrimp

    Breakfast (309 calories)

    • 1 serving Old-Fashioned Oatmeal
    • 1/4 cup raspberries
    • 3 Tbsp. chopped walnuts

    A.M. Snack (131 calories)

    • 1 large pear

    Lunch (493 calories)

    • 1 serving Slow-Cooker Chicken & White Bean Stew

    P.M. Snack (121 calories)

    • 1 large banana

    Dinner (429 calories)

    • 1 serving Charred Shrimp, Pesto & Quinoa Bowls

    Daily Totals: 1,484 calories, 86 g protein, 189 g carbohydrates, 53 g fiber, 51 g fat, 9 g saturated fat, 3,507 mg potassium, 1,247 mg sodium

    To Make it 1,200 Calories: Omit the walnuts at breakfast, change the A.M. snack to 1 clementine and change the P.M. snack to 1 medium apple.

    To Make it 2,000 Calories: Add 1/3 cup dry-roasted unsalted almonds to A.M. snack and add 2 1/2 Tbsp. almond butter to P.M. snack.

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