How Many Mg Of Iron Per Day During Pregnancy

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How Many Mg Of Iron Per Day During Pregnancy – You will discover about the what food items contain iron, if you want to know about which foods to eat throughout your pregnancy and how much iron pregnant women should be eating.

During pregnancy a woman need an extra amount of nutrients.Pregnancy leads to the rapid growth of fetal cells hence the mother’s body needs more iron.It is advised that any pregnant woman should take extra minerals like manganese, calcium, iodine, phosphorus and iron.

How Many Mg Of Iron Per Day During Pregnancy

Iron is a mineral that our bodies need to stay healthy. The red blood cells contain most of the iron in our body, in a pigment called hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is responsible for carrying oxygen around our body to the cells, organs, and tissues where it’s needed.

The Importance of Iron During Pregnancy

When iron levels are low, so are the levels of hemoglobin. This is bad news as it reduces the oxygen supply. Anemia is the name given to low hemoglobin levels.

The normal levels during the first and last trimester of pregnancy are considered to be above 11 grams per deciliter. This changes during the second trimester, when they can be a bit lower, at 10.5 grams per deciliter.

You might feel a bit like a pin cushion during pregnancy, having samples taken all the time. It is necessary, though, to make sure all is well. One of the things checked during blood tests is your iron levels.

Doctors will also check how much iron your body has stored. Yes, it can retain a certain amount of iron for when it’s needed. If you have depleted your stores and your hemoglobin levels are low, you’ll need iron supplements (1).

In addition to supplying nutrients for two, you are also supplying blood to two when you’re pregnant, so your blood supply increases. You will need about double the amount of iron than you do normally, which is about 27 milligrams per day.

If you’re deficient in iron, you can start to feel tired, weak, and dizzy. Your pregnancy glow can wane and you will look pale and probably find yourself breathless. On top of all your other pregnancy symptoms, this is no walk in the park (2).

Cooking some of your food in an old-fashioned iron skillet will leach iron into your meals, thus increasing your iron stores.

pregnant stomach

Most pregnancies progress without incident. But approximately 8 percent of all pregnancies involve complications that, if left untreated, may harm the mother or the baby. While some complications relate to health problems that existed before pregnancy, others occur unexpectedly and are unavoidable.

It can be scary to hear that doctors have diagnosed a complication. You may be worried about your baby’s health and your own health. You may even feel panic that perhaps something you did (or didn’t do) caused this to happen. These feelings are completely normal. It may reassure you to know that nothing you did caused these complications. And beyond that —these complications are treatable. The best thing you can do for you and your baby is to get prenatal care from a provider you trust. With early detection and proper care, you increase the chances of keeping you and your baby healthy.

Do women with normal iron levels benefit from taking iron supplements?

There are more than 60 studies on the use of iron supplements in pregnancy. A total of more than 40,000 women took part in the studies. The results show that, if women have normal iron levels, taking 30 mg of iron per day as a precautionary measure doesn’t have any noticeable health benefits for them or for their children. Although iron supplements were found to lower the risk of anemia, they didn’t influence the number of preterm births, the number of babies with a low birth weight (under 2,500 grams) or infections in pregnant women.

Side effects and dose

When it comes to iron intake, finding the right balance is key. It’s not only too little iron that can cause problems – too much iron can be unhealthy too. Although our bodies can store a certain amount of extra iron, higher-dose iron supplements may cause side effects. These include, in particular, gastrointestinal (stomach and bowel) problems like constipation, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. When taken on an empty stomach, they can damage the lining of the stomach.

Some experts recommend only taking iron supplements once or twice a week rather than every day – but at a higher dose (such as 120 mg). Research has found that iron supplements can even prevent anemia when taken only once a week. The idea is that taking iron supplements less often will enable women to take them for longer, and lower the likelihood of side effects. But it’s not clear whether that is really the case.

What are the consequences of iron deficiency in pregnancy?

Iron deficiency anemia can make you feel tired and exhausted. Severe anemia can also lead to complications in pregnancy. For instance, it can weaken the mother’s immune system and make infections more likely. It also increases the risk of the baby weighing too little at birth (low birth weight).

Severe anemia is rare in healthy pregnant women who eat a balanced diet. But anemia can cause serious health problems in women who don’t, or can’t, eat a balanced diet.

Iron deficiency can lead to a lot of health troubles from poor immunity to hairfall. Most common in women, it can also affect children. One must eat a diet rich in iron to ward off health problems. Ayurveda expert Dr Dixa Bhavsar suggests 5 foods for boosting your iron levels naturally.

1. Sesame seeds (black til): Sesame seeds are loaded with iron, copper, zinc, selenium and vitamin B6, E and folate. Take about 1 tablespoon of black sesame seeds, dry roast, blend with a teaspoon of honey and ghee and roll into a ball. Have this nutritious ladoo regularly to boost your iron levels.

1. Sesame seeds (black til): Sesame seeds are loaded with iron, copper, zinc, selenium and vitamin B6, E and folate. Take about 1 tablespoon of black sesame seeds, dry roast, blend with a teaspoon of honey and ghee and roll into a ball. Have this nutritious ladoo regularly to boost your iron levels, advises Dr Bhavsar.(Pixabay)

2. Dates and raisins: Consume this amazing dry fruit combination every day as it comes with the richness of iron, magnesium, copper, and vitamin A and C. You can have 2-3 dates and a tablespoon of raisins as a snack or with your breakfast to get instant energy and a boost in iron levels.(Unsplash)

2. Dates and raisins: Consume this amazing dry fruit combination every day as it comes with the richness of iron, magnesium, copper, and vitamin A and C. You can have 2-3 dates and a tablespoon of raisins as a snack or with your breakfast to get instant energy and a boost in iron levels.(Unsplash)
Iron has multiple functions in our body:
● Carries oxygen
● Creates energy and assists in cell metabolism
● Helps in supporting a healthy immune system, thus preventing infection
● Assists with brain development
● Enhances cognition
● Helps in concentration and mental performanceIron also impacts the social behavior of toddlers and children. Iron deficiency in our body gradually leads to anemia and low levels of iron in the red blood cells.

Let’s find out why Iron is important during pregnancy:
Iron forms Hemoglobin (Heme + Globin), a protein which carries oxygen and transports it to the cells, tissues, and organs in our body. Most of the iron in our body is found in Hemoglobin present in RBCs.

A pregnant woman needs twice the amount of iron as needed by a non-pregnant woman.  This is because a mother’s body needs iron to make blood, to supply to the growing fetus (baby). If the mother’s body lacks enough iron stores or doesn’t get enough iron through her diet, there is an increased risk of developing IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA (IDA). In this case, a mother will not have enough healthy Red Blood Cells (RBCs) to carry adequate oxygen to the fetus.

How to spot Iron Deficiency:
There are number of symptoms to spot Iron Deficiency and some of them are:
o   Fatigue/ Lack of energy
o   Weakness
o   Pale or yellowish skin
o   Irregular heartbeat
o   Shortness of breath
o   Dizziness or Lightheadedness
o   Chest pain
o   Cold hands and feet
o   Headache

IDA symptoms are often overlooked and clubbed as general pregnancy symptoms. For this reason, a pregnant lady needs to have blood screening tests at regular intervals (as recommended by the physician). As per WHO Guidelines, the Hb threshold in 1st & 3rd trimester for diagnosing anemia is 11.0 g/dL; in the 2nd trimester, the threshold is 10.5 g/dL.

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