How Many Ounces Of Water For Weight Loss

10

How many ounces of water for weight loss ? The amount of water you should drink each day has to do more with your individual water needs and lifestyle than any magic number. Despite what you have been told, there is no one-size-fits all answer. This is why figuring out how many ounces of water for weight loss is essential if you are trying to shed unwanted pounds.

HOW MUCH WATER SHOULD YOU DRINK EACH DAY?

How Much Water to Drink to Lose Weight and Stay Hydrated

The CDC currently recommends 91 ounces of water a day for women. However, Josefsberg recommends exceeding that amount and—as she explains in her book—aiming for 100 ounces of water per day, whether you are male or female. “It is a simple number to remember and will adequately hydrate and be quite a challenge for most,” she notes. She explains that what she’s found is that if someone is aiming for 64 ounces a day, they get about 50. “By making the target higher, I can get clients to get closer to the actual recommendations.”

Lee’s suggestion is a bit less aggressive. “By simple rules, you should drink half of your body weight in ounces,” recommends Lee. “If you weigh 160 pounds, you should drink 80 ounces of water. But again, it is dependent on your level of activity and water loss in a day.”

WHAT IS THE IDEAL AMOUNT OF WATER FOR SOMEONE TRYING TO REV UP THEIR METABOLISM AND BURN MORE CALORIES?

How Much Water to Drink to Lose Weight and Stay Hydrated

PHOTO: DARREN MUIR/STOCKSY

“Hydration is one of the most important pieces of metabolism because your body is over 60% water, and critical organs like the brain and heart are made up of even more,” explains Josefsberg. “Being dehydrated puts a major strain on those important organs, depletes energy, erodes focus, and increases irritability.” Josefsberg notes that each of those factors can be mistaken as hunger signals, and those who are dehydrated tend to reach for food instead of water. “Once I can get clients properly hydrated, we can begin really understanding true hunger signals, and appetite seems to decrease without the added strain of dehydration,” she says. “If you are looking for an almost immediate way to feel better and eat less, begin to properly hydrate.”

Josefberg knows from experience that for her clients, drinking enough water is almost like the most important weight-loss miracle. “It immediately gives them more energy. As body organs like the brain and heart get fueled, they have clarity and energy to make better decisions and stop mistaking hunger for thirst,” she says. “Being hydrated adds to regularity and flushes toxins and inflammation from the body.

How Much Water to Drink to Lose Weight and Stay Hydrated

PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES

Lee notes that everybody’s body is different, and water consumption is also dependent on our individual activity levels. “Through daily activities, our bodies can lose up to three to four liters a day just by perspiration, urine, bowel movement, and exhalation of air,” says Lee. She shares a surprising factoid that we lose one to two liters alone from just breathing. “To lose weight, use water to replace highly dense caloric liquid drinks. She lists flavored coffee, sodas, and fruit juices among the usual suspects. “Drink up to a gallon of water a day, which is about 128 ounces,” she advises.

As for burning more calories directly from drinking water, Lee suggests a simple trick of temperature. “The belief is that when we drink cold water, our bodies have to expend energy to bring the temperature up to match our body’s internal temperature before it can be absorbed,” explains Lee. “It is this process of energy expenditure that helps us burn more calories when we drink cold water. Also, water is part of all cells and required to optimize the body’s function and metabolic pathway.”

WHAT ARE SOME STRATEGIES FOR SOMEONE TRYING TO INCREASE THEIR WATER INTAKE?

How Much Water to Drink to Lose Weight and Stay Hydrated

PHOTO: THE GOOD BRIGADE/GETTY IMAGES

“Beginning the habit of drinking more water will not just happen because you want it to,” explains Josefsberg. “Your habit is not drinking water throughout the day, so in order to trigger a new habit, you should use and set as many triggers for the new behavior as possible.” She recommends using your smartphone to set three alarms throughout the day to remind you to grab a glass of water. “When those alarms go off, get up immediately from what you are doing a get a glass,” she insists. “I encourage folks who work in an office atmosphere to get a water bottle that they begin to fill upon entering the building every morning and refilling at lunch. Josefsberg uses a 33-ounce water bottle and fills it three times a day, knowing that if she gets through all three, she’s good for the day.

This Is How Much Water You Need to Drink for Weight Loss

Losing weight requires a consistent commitment to several lifestyle choices: Eat healthier, exercise more, get 6-8 hours of sleep a night, and drink lots of water. Not only will choosing water over caloric and sugary beverages save you calories, but water is also essential for sharp brain function, keeping your organs working properly, and exercise recovery — to name a few important reasons. And if you’re reaching for detox water, it can help boost your metabolism and flush out toxins.

But just hearing that you need to drink “lots” of water can be confusing. For some people that could be the standard eight 8-ounce glasses, but others could need a lot more (or perhaps less). We tapped dietitian Jim White, RD, ACSM, and owner of Jim White Fitness and Nutrition Studios, to find out just exactly how much water you should be drinking for weight loss. And while you’re making some changes, be sure to try out any of these 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.

For the average person:

Although everyone has different needs, White says sticking to the oft-recommended amount of eight 8-ounce glasses (64 ounces total) should suffice and can help boost weight loss for the average person or someone just looking to drop a few pounds.

It doesn’t sound like an overwhelming number, but the challenge for most people is drinking enough water in the first place. According to a study by the CDC, 43% of adults drink less than four cups of water a day, with 7% reporting they don’t drink any glasses of water—yikes!

In general, you should let your thirst be your guide. If you’re still thirsty after chugging 64 ounces throughout the day, make sure you adjust your intake accordingly. But if you’re feeling quenched, be sure not to overdo it; drinking too much water could lead to hyponatremia, also known as water intoxication, where the sodium levels in the body become overly diluted and can lead to swelling in the brain, seizures, and coma. There’s a reason this dangerous practice is one of the ways you’re drinking water wrong.

If you’re working out a lot:

If you’re a big-time gym rat or endurance athlete, you’ll need more water than the standard 64 ounces. After a serious sweat sesh, you could be depleting your body of proper hydration.

“The American College of Sports Medicine recommends to drink 16 ounces of extra water before you exercise, and to sip on 4-8 ounces during exercise, and another 16 ounces after exercise,” White explains. “You can also weigh yourself before exercise and see how many pounds you lose. Drink 16 ounces afterward for every pound lost.”

If you’re more overweight:

For overweight or obese people, their water needs are different. White says they’ll need to drink even more water to stay properly hydrated and aid in weight loss. A simple math equation for this is to drink half of your body weight in ounces of water. So if you weigh 180 pounds, you should aim for 90 ounces of water a day.

A study published in the Annals of Family Medicine found that people with higher BMIs were the least hydrated. The study suggested that water is an essential nutrient and may play as big of a role in weight loss as food and exercise. Virginia Tech researchers found that overweight adults who drank 16 ounces of water a half an hour before their meals lost three more pounds than those who didn’t, and 9 pounds at the end of 12 weeks.

Replacing caloric and sugary beverages such as soda, fruit juice, and sweetened iced teas with water can also help boost weight loss, White says.

What about the advice to drink 8 glasses a day?

You’ve probably heard the advice to drink eight glasses of water a day. That’s easy to remember, and it’s a reasonable goal.

Most healthy people can stay hydrated by drinking water and other fluids whenever they feel thirsty. For some people, fewer than eight glasses a day might be enough. But other people might need more.

You might need to modify your total fluid intake based on several factors:

  • Exercise. If you do any activity that makes you sweat, you need to drink extra water to cover the fluid loss. It’s important to drink water before, during and after a workout.
  • Environment. Hot or humid weather can make you sweat and requires additional fluid. Dehydration also can occur at high altitudes.
  • Overall health. Your body loses fluids when you have a fever, vomiting or diarrhea. Drink more water or follow a doctor’s recommendation to drink oral rehydration solutions. Other conditions that might require increased fluid intake include bladder infections and urinary tract stones.
  • Pregnancy and breast-feeding. If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, you may need additional fluids to stay hydrated.

Is water the only option for staying hydrated?

No. You don’t need to rely only on water to meet your fluid needs. What you eat also provides a significant portion. For example, many fruits and vegetables, such as watermelon and spinach, are almost 100% water by weight.

In addition, beverages such as milk, juice and herbal teas are composed mostly of water. Even caffeinated drinks — such as coffee and soda — can contribute to your daily water intake. But go easy on sugar-sweetened drinks. Regular soda, energy or sports drinks, and other sweet drinks usually contain a lot of added sugar, which may provide more calories than needed.

How do I know if I’m drinking enough?

Your fluid intake is probably adequate if:

  • You rarely feel thirsty
  • Your urine is colorless or light yellow

Your doctor or dietitian can help you determine the amount of water that’s right for you every day.

To prevent dehydration and make sure your body has the fluids it needs, make water your beverage of choice. It’s a good idea to drink a glass of water:

  • With each meal and between meals
  • Before, during and after exercise
  • If you feel thirsty

Should I worry about drinking too much water

Drinking too much water is rarely a problem for healthy, well-nourished adults. Athletes occasionally may drink too much water in an attempt to prevent dehydration during long or intense exercise. When you drink too much water, your kidneys can’t get rid of the excess water. The sodium content of your blood becomes diluted. This is called hyponatremia and it can be life-threatening.

How to Calculate How Much Water You Should Drink A Day

Lots of people don’t realize the true importance of drinking enough water everyday and how it can impact both your health and your weight loss efforts. According to experts in a recent study, drinking just 2 cups of water, which is smaller than the size of a bottled soda, before meals helped dieters lose an extra five pounds yearly and help you maintain your weight loss. Additionally drinking the right amount of water daily can actually speed up your metabolic rate and help to curb overeating when your body confused hunger and thirst. But how much water is enough? Here is how to calculate how much water you should drink a day for both health and weight loss benefits.

  • Your weight: The first step to knowing how much water to drink everyday is to know your weight. The amount of water a person should drink varies on their weight, which makes sense because the more someone weighs the more water they need to drink. A two hundred pound man and 100 pound woman require different amounts of water every day.
  • Multiply by 2/3: Next you want to multiple your weight by 2/3 (or 67%) to determine how much water to drink daily. For example, if you weighed 175 pounds you would multiple that by 2/3 and learn you should be drinking about 117 ounces of water every day.
  • Activity Level: Finally you will want to adjust that number based on how often you work out, since you are expelling water when you sweat. You should add 12 ounces of water to your daily total for every 30 minutes that you work out. So if you work out for 45 minutes daily, you would add 18 ounces of water to your daily intake

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Like
Close
TheSuperHealthyFood © Copyright 2022. All rights reserved.
Close