How Many Vitamin In Banana

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Did you know that bananas are rich in vitamin B6, which is essential for growing children and people with a deficiency of this vitamin can suffer from anemia and problems with the nervous system?

Vitamin C is also present in bananas. It helps to strengthen your immune system and promotes healing of wounds.

Bananas are also rich in potassium, which helps to maintain fluid balance and muscle function. Other minerals present in bananas include calcium, magnesium, iron, phosphorous and copper.

How Many Vitamin In Banana

Bananas

bunch of bananas
bunch of small red bananas
sliced bananas in a fruit salad with kiwi, oranges, and pomegranates

There’s a bit of confusion surrounding bananas. Some people consider this iconic golden fruit a healthy choice while others avoid it, after seeing it on Internet lists of “5 Worst Foods.” Unfavorable claims suggest that bananas cause weight gain and constipation. An article from 1917 published in the Journal of the American Medical Association defended the nutritional value of bananas, citing rumored beliefs during that time: “The banana is a cause of indigestion and a treacherous dietary component…” [1]

The scientific name for banana is Musa, from the Musaceae family of flowering tropical plants, which distinctively showcases the banana fruit clustered at the top of the plant. The mild-tasting and disease-resistant Cavendish type is the main variety sold in the U.S. and Europe. Despite some negative attention, bananas are nutritious and may even carry the title of the first “superfood,” endorsed by the American Medical Association in the early 20th century as a health food for children and a treatment for celiac disease.

Source Of 

  • Vitamin B6
  • Fiber
  • Potassium
  • Magnesium
  • Vitamin C
  • Manganese

One serving, or one medium ripe banana, provides about 110 calories, 0 gram fat, 1 gram protein, 28 grams carbohydrate, 15 grams sugar (naturally occurring), 3 grams fiber, and 450 mg potassium. 

Types

  • Banana (Cavendish) – Sometimes classified as a “dessert banana,” this classic type is mildly sweet when ripe. Choose bananas with green or clear yellow peels without bruising. The ripening process will change the peel from being thick and stiff to thin and more flexible, with brown spots surfacing until the entire peel darkens. For best flavor, wait until the banana is golden yellow with a few brown spots. With continued ripening, the entire peel turns brownish-black and the pulp begins to ferment and soften further while losing sweetness.

The following are other banana varieties less commonly available in the U.S.

  • Plantain (Green Banana) – Larger, starchier, and less-sweet version of Musa that is often used for cooking. When green, the plantain is unripe with a neutral flavor and firm flesh. In certain tropical regions including Central America, Africa, and the Philippines, the plantain is a major source of carbohydrate that is fried, boiled, or baked in a wide variety of dishes. If allowed to mature, the skin will yellow and develop a slightly sweet flavor that may be eaten raw or cooked.
  • Red Banana – This variety is shorter and plumper than the Cavendish variety with a dark reddish-purple hue. A ripe red banana will be creamy and often sweeter than Cavendish bananas.
  • Lady Finger – Thinner and slightly shorter than the Cavendish bananas, they are sweeter and eaten raw or as dessert.

Bananas and Health

Cardiovascular health


Digestive health

Weight control

Do bananas have a high glycemic index?

Do bananas cause blood sugar spikes and, if so, can they be included in the diets of those with conditions like type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? Some physicians recommend that patients with diabetes choose foods with a low glycemic index. The glycemic index (GI) is a measure of the rise in blood sugar levels after eating a particular food. A GI score of 55 or less is rated as low, meaning that the food will not raise blood sugar significantly. The glycemic load (GL) is a more specific measure that accounts for not only a food’s glycemic index but factors the amount of carbohydrate in one serving of that food. A score of 10 or less is rated as low GL.

According to the International Glycemic Index Database, ripe bananas have a low GI of 51, with slightly under-ripe bananas even lower at 42; they have a moderate GL of 13 and 11, respectively. Why is the glycemic load score higher if the glycemic index is low? It may be due to the higher carbohydrate content of bananas (there are 28 grams in one medium banana vs. about 19 grams in a medium apple); this will increase the glycemic load. However, the type of carbohydrate in bananas is classified as resistant starch, which functions similarly to dietary fiber. Resistant starch is not broken down in the small intestine so it causes less glucose to be released into the bloodstream. This produces a lower glycemic index and a greater feeling of satiety as the starch is digested slowly.

Storage

  • Store at room temperature away from direct sunlight.
  • Do not refrigerate green bananas as this can disrupt normal ripening.
  • To speed up ripening, store in a brown paper bag or place near ripe fruit, which emits ethylene gas that causes ripening. On the flipside, if you wish to slow ripening, store bananas away from other ripe bananas or fruits. Do not store in plastic bags as this traps excess moisture and may promote rotting.
  • Banana “trees” or hangers help expose a cluster of bananas to an even amount of oxygen, and promote gradual ripening by preventing excess pressure and moisture from collecting on the bananas at the bottom of the cluster.
  • Fully ripe golden yellow bananas may be stored in the refrigerator in a sealed produce drawer. Refrigeration will preserve the flavor for another week, even if the peels continue to darken.
  • If the banana peel has ripened to a mostly brown color, remove the peel and chop or mash the pulp to include in baked goods or freeze to be added into smoothies.

Prepare

  • Slice ripe banana into a fruit salad. Squeeze a bit of acid like apple cider vinegar, orange juice, lime, or lemon onto the bananas to prevent darkening too quickly.
  • Substitute an equal amount of mashed banana for butter for dense baked goods like muffins, quick breads, and cookies. Using banana may cause the product to bake faster, so check for doneness several minutes earlier than usual or reduce the oven temperature by 25°F. The bananas will also add sweetness, so reduce the amount of added sugar in the recipe by one-quarter to one-half.
  • For a frozen treat, slice a peeled ripe banana in half (in the middle) and insert a popsicle stick or skewer into the flat end. Dip banana into yogurt and coat evenly; sprinkle with nuts, chopped dried fruit, cinnamon, or other favorite toppings and freeze for several hours.
  • For an easy dairy-free ice cream alternative, peel, chop, and freeze two medium bananas. Place into a blender or food processor and add a few tablespoons of liquid (water, dairy or plant milk, or coconut water). Blend until smooth. Add extra liquid if additional creaminess is desired. For a different flavor, add 1-2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder or nut/seed butter, a splash of vanilla extract and cinnamon, or ½ cup frozen berries.

More recipe ideas and serving suggestions featuring bananas: 

  • Whole Wheat Banana Nut Muffins

Did You Know?

  • In many countries, banana and plantain leaves are recycled as food wrappers, such as to hold tamales and meats. They are also used to cover or wrap various foods while cooking to help seal in flavor.
  • Banana peels contain plant chemicals in the form of antioxidants, and have long been used in traditional and folk medicine as an antiseptic and anti-inflammatory to promote wound healing such as for bug bites, minor burns, and sunburns. [4] As a simple home remedy, the inside of the banana peel is pressed on a wound for several minutes.

banana benefits

 Bananas are incredibly healthy, convenient, delicious, and one of the most inexpensive fresh fruits you can buy. This makes them an excellent choice for anyone interested in eating healthy.

While they’re native to Southeast Asia, they grow ubiquitously in many warm climates, making them available worldwide. The Cavendish variety, the most common type found in grocery stores, starts out firm and green but turns yellow, soft, and sweet as it ripens.

Bananas contain many essential nutrients and may benefit weight loss, digestion, and heart health.

Here are 11 science-based health benefits of bananas.

person holding a bunch of bananas
FreshSplash/Getty Images

1. Rich in nutrients

Bananas contain a fair amount of fiber and several antioxidants. One regular-sized banana (126 grams) also boasts (1Trusted Source):

  • Calories: 112
  • Fat: 0 grams
  • Protein: 1 gram
  • Carbs: 29 grams
  • Fiber: 3 grams
  • Vitamin C: 12% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • Riboflavin: 7% of the DV
  • Folate: 6% of the DV
  • Niacin: 5% of the DV
  • Copper: 11% of the DV
  • Potassium: 10% of the DV
  • Magnesium: 8% of the DV

One banana provides about 112 calories and consists almost exclusively of water and carbs. They hold little protein and no fat.

The carbs in green, unripe bananas are mostly in the form of starch and resistant starch — a type of indigestible fiber we’ll get to shortly. As the fruit ripens, its flavor becomes sweeter while its fiber content drops (2Trusted Source, 3Trusted Source).

2. May improve blood sugar levels

Bananas are rich in soluble fiber. During digestion, soluble fiber dissolves in liquid to form a gel. It’s also what gives bananas their sponge-like texture (3Trusted Source).

Unripe bananas also contain resistant starch, which isn’t digested by your body (2Trusted Source).

Together, these two types of fiber may moderate your blood sugar levels after meals. Plus, they may help regulate your appetite by slowing the emptying of your stomach (4Trusted Source).

This means that despite their higher carb content, bananas won’t cause major spikes in blood sugar levels in healthy individuals. However, while people with diabetes can enjoy bananas, it’s not recommended to enjoy a large portion in one sitting.

3. May support digestive health

Dietary fiber has been linked to many health benefits, including improved digestion. One medium-sized banana provides about 3 grams of fiber (1Trusted Source).

Resistant starch, the type of fiber found in unripe bananas, is a prebiotic. Prebiotics escape digestion and end up in your large intestine, where they become food for the beneficial bacteria in your gut (2Trusted Source, 5Trusted Source).

What’s more, pectin — a fiber found in both ripe and unripe bananas — may help prevent constipation and soften stools (3Trusted Source, 6Trusted Source).

Some test-tube studies even propose that pectin may help protect against colon cancer, although research in humans is still needed to confirm this benefit (7Trusted Source, 8Trusted Source).

4. May aid weight loss

No study has directly tested bananas’ effects on weight loss. However, this popular fruit does have several attributes that could make it a weight-loss-friendly food.

First, bananas have relatively few calories. The average banana has just over 100 calories, yet it’s nutritious and filling (1Trusted Source).

Eating more fiber from vegetables and fruits has repeatedly been linked to lower body weight and weight loss.

Furthermore, unripe bananas are packed with resistant starch, so they tend to be filling and reduce your appetite. If you’d like to include unripe bananas in your diet, try using them as you’d use plantains.

5. May support heart health

Potassium is a mineral that’s vital for heart health, especially blood pressure management. Despite its importance, few people get enough potassium in their diet (12Trusted Source).

Conveniently, bananas are a great source of potassium, with a medium-sized banana (126 grams) providing 10% of the DV (1Trusted Source).

A potassium-rich diet can help lower your blood pressure. Plus, according to older research and animal studies, people who eat plenty of potassium have up to a 27% lower risk of heart disease (13Trusted Source, 14Trusted Source).

What’smore, bananas contain 8% of the DV for magnesium, another mineral that’s important for heart health (1Trusted Source, 15Trusted Source).

Magnesium deficiency may be linked to an increased risk of heart disease, elevated blood pressure, and high levels of fats in the blood. As such, it’s essential that you get enough of the mineral from your diet or supplements (14Trusted Source).

6. Full of antioxidants

Fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of dietary antioxidants, and bananas are no exception.

They contain several types of potent antioxidants, including flavonoids and amines (3Trusted Source).

These antioxidants are linked to many health benefits, such as a reduced risk of heart disease and degenerative illnesses (16Trusted Source, 17Trusted Source).

They help prevent oxidative damage to your cells caused by free radicals. Without antioxidants, free radicals can build up over time and cause harm if their levels become high enough in your body (16Trusted Source, 17Trusted Source).

7. May help you feel fuller

The soluble fiber in bananas may help keep you full by adding bulk to your digestive system and slowing digestion (16Trusted Source).

Additionally, bananas are relatively low in calories for their size (1Trusted Source).

Combined, the low calorie and high fiber contents of bananas make them a more filling snack than other foods like processed or sugary boxed snacks (17Trusted Source).

Protein is also filling, but bananas are low in this macronutrient. So, for a hunger-fighting snack, try eating a sliced banana with protein-rich foods like Greek yogurt, or blend a banana into a protein shake (16Trusted Source).

8. May improve insulin sensitivity when unripe

Insulin resistance is a significant risk factor for several chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes.

Several studies reveal that regularly eating resistant starch — for example, by enjoying unripe bananas — may improve insulin sensitivity. This could make your body more responsive to this blood-sugar-regulating hormone (2Trusted Source, 4Trusted Source, 18Trusted Source).

However, more research investigating how the resistant starch in bananas might affect insulin sensitivity is needed.

9. May improve kidney health

Potassium is vital for healthy kidney function and blood pressure regulation (19Trusted Source).

As great dietary sources of potassium, bananas could be especially beneficial when it comes to keeping your kidneys healthy.

One study including over 5,000 people with early stage chronic kidney disease linked potassium to lower blood pressure and a slower progression of kidney disease (19Trusted Source).

On the other hand, some people with late stage kidney disease or who are on dialysis need to restrict their potassium intake. If you fall into one of these categories, speak with your healthcare team before increasing your potassium intake (19Trusted Source).

10. May support exercise recovery

Bananas are sometimes referred to as the perfect food for athletes. This is largely due to their content of easily digested carbs, as well as the minerals potassium and magnesium, both of which act as electrolytes (20Trusted Source).

You lose electrolytes through your sweat during vigorous exercise. Resupplying your body with potassium and magnesium after sweating, for example by eating a banana, may reduce exercise-related muscle cramps and soreness (20Trusted Source).

However, specific research on the effects of bananas on exercise performance, cramping, and exercise recovery is lacking.

Nevertheless, bananas provide excellent nutrition before, during, and after exercise.

11. Easy to add to your diet

Bananas are not only incredibly healthy but also one of the most convenient snack foods around.

They make a great addition to yogurt, cereal, and smoothies, and they work a treat as a topping on whole grain toast with peanut butter. You can even use them in place of sugar in your baking and cooking.

Bananas are likewise incredibly easy to eat and transport. They’re usually well tolerated and easily digested. All you need to do is peel them, and you’re good to go.

The bottom line

Bananas are a popular fruit with many potential health benefits.

They may boost your digestion and heart health thanks to their fiber and antioxidant contents. Plus, they may support weight loss because they’re relatively low in calories, nutrient dense, and filling.

Both ripe, yellow bananas and unripe, green bananas can satisfy your sweet tooth and help keep you healthy.

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