How Much Iron Should You Take For Iron Deficiency

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How Much Iron Should You Take For Iron Deficiency? How much iron do you need? Do you have iron deficiency? There are other options besides supplements.

Millions of women experience fatigue, irritability and weakness just because they aren’t getting enough iron. And while people tend to prefer tablets to liquids, it’s important to note that iron can be hard on your stomach. To help you determine the right level of iron intake for your needs, here’s a look at how much iron you should take, your body’s absorption rate and the best kinds of iron for you.

How Much Iron Should You Take For Iron Deficiency

How much iron should you take?

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) includes the iron you get from both the food you eat and any supplements you take.

Category

Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA)

CHILDREN

7-12 months

11 mg/day

1-3 years

7 mg/day

4-8 years

10 mg/day

9-13 years

8 mg/day

FEMALES

14-18 years

15 mg/day

19-50 years

18 mg/day

51 years and over

8 mg/day

Pregnant

27 mg/day

Breastfeeding 

Under 19 years: 10 mg/day

19 years and over: 9 mg/day

MALES

14-18 years

11 mg/day

19 years and up

8 mg/day

Iron-deficiency anemia means that your body does not have enough iron. Your body needs iron to help carry oxygen through your blood to all parts of your body. Iron-deficiency anemia affects more women than men and is more common during pregnancy.

IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN CHILDREN IRON%20DEFICIENCY%20ANEMIA%20IN%20CHILDREN

The Iron deficiency anemia abbreviated as IDA is the most common cause of anemia among children in developing countries. It is more common in rural areas from poor socio-economic status compared to urban areas.

An infant or child who is anemic does not have enough red blood cells (RBCs) or hemoglobin or both. Hemoglobin is actually a protein that lets RBCs that helps in the gaseous exchange in the body. It is hemoglobin that transfers Oxygen from the lungs to various body tissues and Carbon dioxide from tissues to the lungs for excretion. The key component in the formation of Hemoglobin is the Iron.

Anemia caused by low iron – children

Anemia is a condition in which the body does not have enough healthy red blood cells. Red blood cells provide oxygen to body tissues. There are many types of anemia.

Iron helps make red blood cells and helps these cells carry oxygen. A lack of iron in the body may lead to anemia. The medical name of this problem is iron deficiency anemia.

Causes

Anemia caused by a low iron level is the most common form of anemia. The body gets iron through certain foods. It also reuses iron from old red blood cells.

A diet that does not have enough iron is the most common cause of this type of anemia in children. When a child is growing rapidly, such as during puberty, even more iron is needed.

Toddlers who drink too much cow’s milk may also become anemic if they are not eating other healthy foods that have iron.

Other causes may be:

  • The body is not able to absorb iron well, even though the child is eating enough iron.
  • Slow blood loss over a long period, often due to menstrual periods or bleeding in the digestive tract.

Iron deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning.

Done by: Mohammed A Qazzaz
Objective • INTRODUCTION • PREVALENCE • IRON BALANCE • REQUIREMENTS • Causes • CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS • Diagnosis • Treat...

How does anemia affect older adults?

In older adults, anemia might have even more impact in causing confusion or depression. Weakness may make walking more difficult. Anemia may shorten your lifespan if you are older and it is not treated.

Can anemia affect my weight?

Having enough iron may also be a factor in weight issues. Studies have found overweight people might lose weight if they address low iron in the blood. You might experience unintentional weight loss along with anemia if you have other conditions, such as cancer. People who have had weight loss surgery might become anemic due to vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

How does anemia affect pregnancy?

Iron deficiency during pregnancy increases the chance of complications, such as premature birth. After the birth, studies have indicated that babies born to women with low iron levels have a higher risk of low birth weight and problems with their own iron levels.

If you are pregnant, you are more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Your unborn baby relies on you for iron and other nutrients. Many women who are pregnant take iron pills to prevent anemia. To make sure that you have enough iron for you and your baby, eat well-balanced meals that include iron-rich foods and foods that provide B12 and B9 vitamins. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions for taking vitamins and adding iron to your diet.

Finding out that you have anemia is just the beginning. Finding the cause of the anemia will lead you to the best treatment.

SYMPTOMS AND CAUSES

What causes anemia?

The most common cause of anemia is low levels of iron in the body. This type of anemia is called iron-deficiency anemia. Your body needs a certain amount of iron to make hemoglobin, the substance that moves oxygen throughout your body. However, iron-deficiency anemia is just one type. Other types are caused by:

  • Diets lacking in vitamin B12, or you can’t use or absorb Vitamin B12 (like pernicious anemia).
  • Diets lacking in folic acid, also called folate, or your body can’t use folic acid correctly (like folate-deficiency anemia).
  • Inherited blood disorders (like sickle cell anemia or thalassemia).
  • Conditions that cause red blood cells to break down too fast (like hemolytic anemia).
  • Chronic conditions causing your body to not have enough hormones to create red blood cells. These include hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, advanced kidney disease, lupus and other long-term diseases.
  • Blood loss related to other conditions such as ulcers, hemorrhoids or gastritis.

What causes iron-deficiency anemia?

You can get iron-deficiency anemia from:

  • Bleeding, either from losing a large amount of blood quickly (for instance, in a serious accident) or losing small amounts of blood over a long period of time. The body loses more iron with blood loss than it is able to replace with food. This can happen to women having heavy menstrual periods or in people who have inflammatory bowel disease.
  • Not getting enough iron in the diet.
  • Needing more iron than you did previously (for instance, during pregnancy or illness).

Some types of iron-deficiency anemia are called by other names related to the cause, such as anemia of chronic disease (also called anemia of inflammation) or acute blood loss anemia.

What causes types of anemia that aren’t iron-deficiency anemia?

Pernicious anemia

In a strict sense, pernicious anemia happens when a person lacks something called intrinsic factor, which lets them absorb vitamin B12. Without vitamin B12, the body cannot develop healthy red blood cells. Other types of anemia that involve lack of B vitamins, such as B9 (folic acid), are also often lumped in as pernicious anemia. This name may refer to other conditions, including folic acid deficiency anemia and Addison’s anemia, even though there is no intrinsic factor deficiency.

Hemolytic anemia

This type of anemia can be caused by inherited or acquired diseases that cause the body to make deformed red blood cells that die off too quickly. (An acquired disease is one that you didn’t have when you were born.) If it is not genetic, hemolytic anemia can be caused by harmful substances or reactions to certain drugs.

Sickle cell anemia

This genetic form of anemia happens because the shape of the red blood cells is faulty. They are sickle shaped, which means that they can clog the blood vessels and cause damage. The hemoglobin does not work correctly. This type of anemia is most often, but not always, found in African Americans.

Diamond-Blackfan anemia

This is a rare blood disorder that may be inherited or acquired. In this type of anemia, the bone marrow does not make enough red blood cells. Diamond-Blackfan anemia is diagnosed within the first year of life in nearly 90% of people who have it.

Aplastic anemia

This is a type of anemia in that is caused by damaged bone marrow which is unable to make enough red blood cells. It also may be congenital or acquired. Another name for aplastic anemia is bone marrow aplasia (failure). Some people might think of this condition as cancer, but it is not.

There is something referred to by some people as myelodysplastic anemia. However, myelodyplastic syndromes (MDS) refer to actual cancer and are a result of abnormal cells in the bone marrow.

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