Ina Garten Apple Pear Crisp

40

Ina Garten Apple Pear Crisp is her most recent recipe on her Food Network show Barefoot Contessa. You will certainly be talking about this crisp! And so easy for the top rated Ina Garten Apple Pear Crisp Recipe. fall is here and its the best time of the year for you to get apples and start making this Pear, Apple and Cranberry Crisp desserts

The health benefits of apple are numerous and well documented, including improved cardiovascular health and being able to help prevent certain cancers. Some of the more common benefits that occur with regular consumption of organic apples include:

Ina Garten Apple Pear Crisp

  • Level: Easy
  • Total: 1 hr 25 min
  • Prep: 30 min
  • Cook: 55 min
  • Yield: 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds ripe Bosc pears (4 pears)
  • 2 pounds firm Macoun apples (6 apples)
  • 1 teaspoon grated orange zest
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

For the topping:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup light brown sugar, lightly packed
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup old-fashioned oatmeal
  • 1/2 pound (2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, diced
Top this delicious, citrus-flavored pear crisp with a scoop of vanilla ice cream for the perfect springtime dessert! Gluten-free, vegan and nut-free. Find this and other great, allergy-safe recipes at accidentallycrunchy.com

Directions

  1. Set the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Pears and apples should be peeled, cored, and cut into sizeable pieces. In a large bowl, combine the fruit with the sugar, flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, juices, and zests. Pour into an oval baking dish that is 9 by 12 by 2 inches.
  3. In the bowl of an electric mixer with the paddle attachment, combine the butter, oats, sugars, and flour for the topping. Mixture should be in large crumbles after one minute of low-speed blending. To completely cover the fruit, sprinkle equally over it.
  4. Bake the baking dish on a sheet pan for 50 to an hour, or until the fruit is bubbling and the top is browned. Serve hot.

Pear, Apple and Cranberry Crisp

  • Level: Easy
  • Total: 1 hr 20 min
  • Prep: 20 min
  • Cook: 1 hr
  • Yield: 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds ripe Bosc pears (4 pears)
  • 2 pounds firm Macoun apples (6 apples)
  • 3/4 cup dried cranberries
  • 1 teaspoon grated orange zest
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

For the topping:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup light brown sugar, lightly packed
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup old-fashioned oatmeal
  • 1/2 pound (2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, diced

Directions

  1. Set the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. The pears and apples should be peeled, cored, and cut into substantial pieces. A big bowl should be used to combine the fruit with the cranberries, sugar, flour, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Pour into a baking dish that is 9 by 12 by 2 inches.
  3. For the garnish:
  4. In the bowl of an electric mixer with a paddle attachment, combine the flour, sugars, salt, oatmeal, and cold butter. For one to two minutes, or until the material is in large crumbles, mix at a low speed. To completely cover the fruit, sprinkle equally over it.
  5. Bake the baking dish for 50 to 1 hour, or until the top is browned and the fruit is bubbling, on a sheet pan coated with parchment paper. Serve hot.
  • Recipe Type: Dessert
  • Prep time: 30 mins
  • Cook time: 1 hour
  • Total time: 1 hour 30 mins
  • Serves: 10
Top this delicious, citrus-flavored pear crisp with a scoop of vanilla ice cream for the perfect springtime dessert! Gluten-free, vegan and nut-free. Find this and other great, allergy-safe recipes at accidentallycrunchy.com

Ingredients

  • Apple pear filling:
  • zest of 1 orange, grated
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice
  • zest of 1 lemon, grated
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 2¼ pounds granny smith apples, peeled, cored and cut into medium size pieces
  • 2¼ pounds anjou pears, peeled, cored and cut into medium size pieces
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 2 dashes ground nutmeg
  • Streusel topping:
  • 16 tablespoons (2 sticks) unsalted butter, diced
  • 1½ cups all purpose flour
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • ¾ cup light brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup old fashioned oats

Instructions

  1. Set the oven to 350 degrees. A 2-quart oval or rectangular baking dish should be buttered and left aside.
  2. When making the apple-pear filling:
  3. Place all the ingredients in a sizable bowl and mix well.
  4. Topping with streusel:
  5. Put the ingredients in the electric mixer’s big bowl. Just until the ingredients come together, blend on low speed. Place aside.
  6. Place a thick layer of fruit on top of the filling in the buttered dish. To keep the streusel topping from slipping off the fruit, pat it onto the fruit.
  7. Bake the baking dish for one hour at 350 degrees on a baking sheet.
  8. Serve hot.
  9. Tidbits from Betsy
  10. You can bake your apple-pear crisp in a 212 quart baking dish as an alternative. There won’t be as much fruit stacked up. Because it won’t come off, the streusel topping can be sprinkled on top rather than patted down.
  11. Transfer the Apple Pear Crisp on a trivet as soon as it comes out of the oven to prevent the baking dish from sticking to the baking pan.
Top this delicious, citrus-flavored pear crisp with a scoop of vanilla ice cream for the perfect springtime dessert! Gluten-free, vegan and nut-free. Find this and other great, allergy-safe recipes at accidentallycrunchy.com

PREPPING YOUR PEAR CRISP RECIPE

Set the oven to 180 C in advance so that it can warm up while you complete the preparation.

Wash – I always use a produce wash like this one to thoroughly wash my produce. Until you see the water your fruit or vegetables were left to soak in, you won’t realize how filthy they are.

Peel and core the pears once they have been rinsed, then cut them into small wedges. I sliced up 10 medium green pears, yielding somewhat more than 5 cups of pieces. This will go more quickly if you use a sharp knife (I prefer a boning knife for this).

Prepare the fruit layer by combining all the ingredients to make a sauce, then spooning it over the pear. After a thorough toss, distribute the pear mixture evenly around your baking dish.

To prepare the topping, combine all the ingredients in a bowl and well mix; the mixture will become clumpy and crumbly. Spread the topping evenly over the fruit layer so that it covers the fruit entirely.

Bake until the crumble topping is pleasantly browned and the pear layer starts to bubble, around 20 to 30 minutes, depending on how well your oven maintains the temperature (roughly 40-45 min).

Eat, then take out of the oven and let cool a little. Serve warm either alone or with a spoonful of ice cream. Any leftovers should be kept in the refrigerator to reheat.

Top this delicious, citrus-flavored pear crisp with a scoop of vanilla ice cream for the perfect springtime dessert! Gluten-free, vegan and nut-free. Find this and other great, allergy-safe recipes at accidentallycrunchy.com

THE PERFECT PEAR CRISP RECIPE | VEGAN AND GLUTEN-FREE

  • PREP TIME
  • 15 mins
  • COOK TIME
  • 40 mins
  • TOTAL TIME
  • 55 mins

Citrus flavors in this pear crisp dish give the conventional pear or apple crisp recipe a pleasantly cool twist. For the ideal end to any meal, serve this gluten-free vegan baked pear dessert with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

  • Recipe type: Dessert
  • Serves: 9 servings

INGREDIENTS

The Fruit Layer

  • 5 cups pear, peeled, cored and sliced into wedges (appx 10 medium pears)
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp orange juice
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 1 tsp orange zest
  • ⅜ (1/4 + ⅛) cup maple syrup
  • ½ tsp nutmeg
  • ½ tsp cinnamon (optional)
  • ¼ cup flour (gluten-free or wheat)

The Topping

  • 1.5 cups spelt flour (can substitute gluten-free flour or regular wheat flour)
  • ½ cup + 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • ⅓ cup coconut sugar
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 cup oats
  • ¼ cup + 2 tbsp coconut oil (in its liquid state)

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Oven: Preheat to 180 C.
  2. Orange juice, lemon juice, orange zest, lemon zest, maple syrup, nutmeg (and cinnamon), and flour should all be combined in a bowl and given a brisk fork toss.
  3. The pear should be thoroughly coated in the mixture after being added to the bowl.
  4. In a 9″ baking dish or 9 ramekins, evenly distribute the pear filling and set aside.
  5. The flour, brown sugar, coconut sugar, oats, and hot coconut oil should all be mixed into a crumbly mixture in a separate basin.
  6. Once the pear is completely covered, evenly distribute the topping over it (you may have a couple of tbsp of topping left over, or you can add it all to the pan).
  7. The crumble should be baked for 40 minutes, or until the top is golden and the pear filling starts to bubble.
  8. Remove from the oven when done. Serve warm, either on its own or with a dollop of ice cream or whipped topping.

HEALTH BENEFITS OF APPLE

It’s hardly surprising that apples are the most extensively consumed fruit worldwide given that there are over 7,000 different kinds available.

There is an apple for everyone, whether they prefer sweet red kinds like Red Delicious, Fuji, or Gala or tart green ones like Granny Smith — my personal favorite, which I enjoy with lime juice and a little salt when I want a salty snack.

In recipes for things like pies, pastries, muffins, jam, salads, oats, or smoothies, they are frequently utilized. They are also delicious as a snack when cut into wedges and spread with nut butter.

Apples are a particularly nutritious fruit with a wide range of benefits that have been supported by research, in addition to their culinary versatility and a wide variety of hues and flavors.

1. Nutritious

Apples are categorized as fruits that are high in nutrients and offer a lot of nutrients per serving.

For a 2,000-calorie diet, the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend 2 cups of fruit per day, with an emphasis on whole fruits like apples.

The nutrients contained in a medium 7-ounce (200 gram) apple are as follows:

  • Calories: 104
  • Carbs: 28 grams
  • Fiber: 5 grams
  • Vitamin C: 10% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • Copper: 6% of the DV
  • Potassium: 5% of the DV
  • Vitamin K: 4% of the DV

Vitamins E, B1, and B6 are also present in the same meal at 2-5% of the DV each.

Vitamin B1 (thiamine), often known as vitamin B1, is required for growth and development, whereas vitamin B6 is crucial for protein metabolism. Vitamin E acts as a fat-soluble antioxidant.

A significant class of antioxidants called polyphenols is also abundant in apples. Antioxidants are substances that shield your cells from free radicals, which are dangerous molecules that aid in the development of chronic diseases like cancer and heart disease.

Although these plant components are not listed on nutrition labels, they are probably the source of many of apples’ health advantages.

Leave the skin on apples to get the most nutrients out of them as it includes the majority of the polyphenols and half of the fiber.

SUMMARY

Apples are a good source of fiber and vitamin C. They also contain antioxidants, like vitamin E, and polyphenols that contribute to the fruit’s numerous health benefits.

2. May support weight loss

Apples are full because they are high in fiber and water.

An increasing sense of fullness can aid in weight loss because it controls hunger. You might then decide to consume less energy as a result of this.

According to one study, compared to drinking apple juice or purée in the same amounts, eating whole apples prolonged feelings of satiety for up to 4 hours. This occurred because entire apples slow down the rate at which your stomach discharges its contents (a condition known as gastric emptying).

Additionally, studies suggest eating apples could considerably lower Body Mass Index (BMI), a measure of weight-related heart disease risk.

It’s interesting to think that apple polyphenols may potentially help prevent obesity.

SUMMARY

Apples are particularly filling due to their high fiber and water content. Their polyphenols may also have anti-obesity effects.

3. Could be good for your heart

Apple consumption is associated with a lower risk of heart disease.

They may include soluble fiber, which could be one factor. The blood cholesterol levels can be lowered with the use of this type of fiber.

It’s also possible that they provide polyphenols as a factor. Among these, the flavonoid epicatechin may help decrease blood pressure.

Additionally, studies have connected high flavonoid intake to a reduced risk of stroke.

Additionally, flavonoids, which reduce the building of plaque in your arteries and lower blood pressure, LDL cholesterol oxidation, and atherosclerosis, can help prevent heart disease.

Eating fruits and vegetables with white flesh, such as apples and pears, has also been related to a lower risk of stroke in another study. The risk of stroke dropped by 9% for every 1/5 cup (25 grams) of apple slices ingested daily.

SUMMARY

Apples promote heart health in several ways. They’re high in soluble fiber, which helps lower cholesterol. They also have polyphenols, which are linked to lower blood pressure and stroke risk.

4. Linked to a lower risk of diabetes

Apple consumption may also lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

A review of studies revealed that consuming apples and pears was linked to an 18% lower incidence of type 2 diabetes. In fact, a weekly dose of just one could lower the risk by 3%.

This advantageous result might be due to their high levels of the antioxidant polyphenols quercetin and phloridzin.

The anti-inflammatory properties of quercetin may lessen insulin resistance, a significant risk factor for the development of diabetes. Phloridzin, meantime, may lessen the absorption of sugar in the intestines, resulting in lower blood sugar levels and a decreased chance of developing diabetes.

SUMMARY

Eating apples is linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, potentially due to their polyphenol content.

5. May promote gut health

Pectin, a form of fiber that serves as a prebiotic, can be found in apples. This indicates that it nourishes the beneficial bacteria in your stomach, known as the gut microbiota.

Your gut microbiota contributes significantly to your general health by being involved in a wide range of processes that are related to both health and disease. Frequently, the secret to better health is a healthy stomach.

Pectin enters your colon intact because dietary fiber cannot be digested, which helps the growth of healthy bacteria. It specifically raises the proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteriodetes, the two major bacterial species in your gut.

According to recent studies, apples may help prevent chronic diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and cancer by enhancing the gut bacteria.

SUMMARY

The type of fiber found in apples improves your gut-friendly bacteria, which may be why the fruit is thought to help protect against chronic diseases.

6. Might help prevent cancer

Apple antioxidants may be effective in preventing some malignancies, including as tumors of the digestive system, breast, and lungs.

According to research conducted in test tubes, apple polyphenols may be responsible for these effects by preventing malignant cells from proliferating.

Additionally, a study conducted on women found that eating more apples was associated with a lower risk of dying from cancer.

Apples’ ability to combat cancer may also be attributed to their high fiber content.

For instance, a different test-tube investigation discovered that apple pectin fiber could prevent the development of cancer cells and even cause their demise.

To further understand the potential relationship between apples and the prevention of cancer, however, human studies are required. For instance, it would be helpful to determine the right amounts and times to eat apples.

SUMMARY

Apple’s fiber and antioxidant content have been linked to a reduced risk of certain types of cancer. However, more research in humans is needed.

7. Could help fight asthma

Apples are high in antioxidants, which may help shield your lungs from oxidative damage.

Oxidative damage can be brought on by an abundance of dangerous chemicals known as free radicals. Your body may respond by becoming inflammatory and allergic as a result.

The anti-inflammatory antioxidant quercetin, which is abundant in apple skin, can help control your immune system and lessen inflammation. This might theoretically make apples useful against reactions in the later stages of bronchial asthma.

Quercetin may be a viable treatment for allergic inflammatory disorders like asthma and sinusitis, according to test-tube and animal research, which support this claim.

Proanthocyanidins, among other substances present in apples, may also lessen or stop allergic asthmatic airway inflammation.

Still, further study of humans is required in this area.

SUMMARY

Apples have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compounds that may help control allergic reactions and safeguard against asthma. However, more research, especially in humans, is needed.

8. May help protect your brain

Apples’ quercetin may shield your brain from oxidative stress-related harm.

According to mouse studies, quercetin’s antioxidant properties may shield the brain and nerves from oxidative stress and shield them from damage that could lead to degenerative brain illnesses like Alzheimer’s or dementia.

In addition, quercetin controls oxidative and inflammatory stress indicators, which may protect against stress-related nerve injury.

However, bear in mind that the majority of study focuses on a particular chemical rather than whole apples. As a result, more investigation is still required before any judgments can be made.

SUMMARY

Quercetin in apples may protect your brain against oxidative stress. However, further research is needed to validate the effect of eating the whole fruit.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Like
Close
TheSuperHealthyFood © Copyright 2022. All rights reserved.
Close