Keeping It Hale And Healthy For Toddlers

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The “Keep It Hale and Healthy For Toddlers” infographics seek to highlight the importance of good nutrition in the formative years of a child’s development. Food is not just the medium of satiating hunger but uplifting the mood. It holds a different definition for all kinds of people.

Children have some perspective and tastes for food and adolescents and elderly can perceive it pretty differently.

The most interesting food and recipes are for the toddlers because they have to be given some specific nutrition and taste. Not much spicy, no excess salt, sweetness, bitterness etc and of course it has to be healthy.

Healthy food recipes for toddlers can be just perfect treat that can pleasure their taste buds as well as keep them happy and cheerful. Let’s take a look at some of the recipes that you can make for them.

Fish fingers with Chips

Fish fingers with chips is a British food dish, consisting of fish fingers and chips (French fries) served in the same compartment of a cardboard or plastic tray. It is generally eaten for lunch or tea. In Scotland, it is also known as “fish on Fridays”, although Friday is referred to as Catholic Friday, their abstinence from meat day.
Let’s get this going with the classic fish and Chips.

What goes into it?

  • 2 potatoes
  • 2 tbsp oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 100g breadcrumbs, made from day-old bread
  • ½ tsp sweet smoked paprika
  • 4 salmon fillets cut into 3 strips
  • Oil
  • Assorted vegetables to serve

How it is done?

  • Heat oven to 200C/180C. Put the potato wedges on the baking tray. Put 1 tbsp oil in a pan and sauté potatoes. Season them evenly. Cook in the oven for 20 minutes, and turn then half golden.
  • In the meantime, put the beaten egg in a bowl. Place the breadcrumbs onto a plate. Blend the sugary smoked paprika into the breadcrumbs together with a little seasoning.
  • Brush a non-stick baking sheet with some oil. Immerse the fish strips into the egg, and then coat them with the breadcrumbs. Bake for 25 minutes until they are golden. Lift them cautiously with a spoon. Serve with some vegetables and the chips.

Time Taken

It takes around 40 minutes to get it done.

 Sweet corn & spinach fritters

What goes into it?

  • 1 x small 195gram no-salt sweet corn
  • Some baby spinach leaf
  • 1 small garlic clove, crushed
  • 1 chopped spring onion
  • 50g plain flour
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1 egg
  • 50ml milk
  • 1 tsp  oil

How it is done?

  • Put all the ingredients in a food processor until they are fairly smooth.
  • Heat a little oil in a frying pan and add four spoons of mixture into the pan. Fry for just less than 1 min till they get lightly golden. Flatten with a spatula to make sure even cooking all the way through. Cook fitters in a couple of batches. Serve them warm and I am sure that the kids will love it.

Summing it up

If one can dish out some simple, tasty and healthy dishes the toddles will surely fall in love with the dishes and you will not be worried about the health. Super healthy food has a wide range of recopies in the store that is both healthy and tasty at the same time. It has recipes for all the courses, so you don’t have to be selective at any point in time.

Keeping Baby Hale and Hearty

Lydia Hurlbut admits she was a bit nuts the first six weeks after bringing home her new baby, Kyra. She wouldn’t allow children — healthy or sniffling — within eyesight of the newborn. She admitted adults to her home only after she carefully screened them for colds and other illnesses and even then she send them off first thing to wash their hands.”I was a total freak about it, absolutely psychotic,” says Hurlbut, who is a registered nurse in Pasadena, Calif. But she’s convinced that those draconian measures — along with breast-feeding almost exclusively for Kyra’s first year — paid off by keeping her baby healthy. “Kyra didn’t even get a cold until she was 8 months old.”

 

Pediatricians say infants typically don’t get sick much in the first few months after birth, primarily because they’re born with antibodies they’ve acquired in the womb. Breast-feeding can also help protect against certain ailments, such as ear infections and some respiratory illnesses.

Build That Immunity

Nonetheless, it’s important to minimize exposure to germs in the first three months because babies’ immune systems aren’t developed until then, and their bodies aren’t as good at battling illnesses on their own yet. Premature infants are at greatest risk of getting sick since they haven’t had as long in utero to acquire their moms’ antibodies.

“In those early weeks, their bodies don’t respond as efficiently as they will when they get to be 3 to 6 months of age,” says Dr. Lillian Blackmon, associate professor of pediatrics at University of Maryland School of Medicine and a member of the American Academy’s committee on fetuses and newborns.
Even the common cold can be tough on infants since they breathe only through their noses during the first few months and can’t cough to clear mucus from the backs of their throats. Their airways are smaller, too. “They get into a lot of distress,” says Dr. Blackmon. “They’ll be irritable, they won’t feed well, they’ll cry, and they won’t sleep very well.”

 

Avoiding the ‘Day-care Flu’

Parents can do a lot to stave off illnesses. “Number one, wash your hands a lot because that’s one of the major ways that things are transmitted,” says Dr. William Kanto, chairman of the department of pediatrics at Medical College of Georgia and another AAP member of the fetus and newborn committee.

Other popular pediatrician tips:

 

  • Stay current on immunizations
  • Keep infants, especially under 3 months, away from adults and children who are sick
  • Avoid crowded grocery stores, malls and other public places
  • Choose child care carefully

If you have to send your little one to child care, try to find a situation that minimizes the risks — not an easy task, since even the best day-care facilities, with the most conscientious staffs, can be awash in germs.

It will also help to limit the number of day-care providers you use: Find a good day care and stick with it, and select a place that separates infants from other children. “Think about whether this will be a family day care with a few children or a large day care,” advises Blackmon, “because every time you expand the number of families, you expand the infection risk.”

Worried? Call the Doc

The most common illnesses babies get during the first year of life are colds and upper respiratory illnesses, gastrointestinal viruses and ear infections. Most will come down with about six illnesses with fever in the first year, says Dr. Kanto. Those born in the winter, when germs breed indoors, or who live with smokers or toddlers tend to get sick more often.

New parents often have difficulty judging when to call the doctor, but most doctors say it’s better to be safe than sorry, and many offices offer call-in times or nurse practitioners to discuss concerns.

Dr. Blackmon tells new parents to call her if their baby:

  • Has a fever, particularly over 100.2 degrees, or a temperature below normal
  • Won’t eat
  • Is listless and lethargic
  • Cries continuously
  • Coughs
  • Has loose stools or stools mixed with mucus or blood
  • Vomits most of what he’s just eaten

A sick infant’s condition can change rapidly, so many doctors suggest a call as soon as parents observe a fever in an infant under 3 months old. Don’t simply chalk up a fever to teething, either, since many teething children don’t exhibit such symptoms, says Pamela Lemons, a pediatric nurse practitioner at James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis. (Children cut teeth between 3 months and 2 years.)

Gather Your Thoughts

Hurlbut says that calls to the doctor’s office will go more smoothly if parents arm themselves with as many observations and bits of information as possible, ahead of time. She realized this recently when Kyra, now 2, had symptoms of a cold that turned out to be pneumonia.

Before You Call the Doctor Write Down:

  • Symptoms and when they started, such as:

Temperature
Trouble breathing; cough or heartbeat faster than usual
Change in sleeping pattern
Change in behavior: irritable, crying, tired, lethargic
Vomiting or diarrhea; number of wet or soiled diapers per day
No appetite
Pulling at ears
Eyes glassy, red or have a discharge
Skin: pale, clammy, sweaty, dry or shows a rash

  • Why you’re worried:

Are symptoms getting worse?
Has your baby had a history of this problem or another medical problem?
Has the baby been exposed to others who are ill

  • What you’ve done to alleviate the symptoms or make your baby more comfortable, and what effect these measures have had
  • Your pharmacy’s phone number

“I was able to give the doctor’s office another four symptoms that developed in a matter of hours,” says Hurlbut. “The more information you have, the more credible you are, and the more they know whether this is something that just needs to be watched or seen right away.”

Above all, trust your own observations and instincts. Even if you’re a novice, it doesn’t take long to learn your infant’s typical behavior and to notice when something is awry.”You gain confidence in your judgment as you learn to recognize your baby’s cues,” says Dr. Blackmon. “Once parents get past that point, they’re going to know more about their baby than their pediatrician does.”

 

What goes into it?

  • 2 potatoes
  • 2 tbsp oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 100g breadcrumbs, made from day-old bread
  • ½ tsp sweet smoked paprika
  • 4 salmon fillets cut into 3 strips
  • Oil
  • Assorted vegetables to serve

How it is done?

  • Heat oven to 200C/180C. Put the potato wedges on the baking tray. Put 1 tbsp oil in a pan and sauté potatoes. Season them evenly. Cook in the oven for 20 minutes, and turn then half golden.
  • In the meantime, put the beaten egg in a bowl. Place the breadcrumbs onto a plate. Blend the sugary smoked paprika into the breadcrumbs together with a little seasoning.
  • Brush a non-stick baking sheet with some oil. Immerse the fish strips into the egg, and then coat them with the breadcrumbs. Bake for 25 minutes until they are golden. Lift them cautiously with a spoon. Serve with some vegetables and the chips.

Avoiding the ‘Day-care Flu’

Parents can do a lot to stave off illnesses. “Number one, wash your hands a lot because that’s one of the major ways that things are transmitted,” says Dr. William Kanto, chairman of the department of pediatrics at Medical College of Georgia and another AAP member of the fetus and newborn committee.

Other popular pediatrician tips:
  • Stay current on immunizations
  • Keep infants, especially under 3 months, away from adults and children who are sick
  • Avoid crowded grocery stores, malls and other public places
  • Choose child care carefully

If you have to send your little one to child care, try to find a situation that minimizes the risks — not an easy task, since even the best day-care facilities, with the most conscientious staffs, can be awash in germs.

It will also help to limit the number of day-care providers you use: Find a good day care and stick with it, and select a place that separates infants from other children. “Think about whether this will be a family day care with a few children or a large day care,” advises Blackmon, “because every time you expand the number of families, you expand the infection risk.”

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