Strawberry Cobbler Pioneer Woman

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Strawberry Cobbler Pioneer Woman is a fun dessert that consists of sweet, brown sugar-covered strawberries with a tasty and simple sugar cookie crust underneath. Strawberry Cobbler Squares is one of my favorite desserts. It’s the season for fresh, juicy strawberries! We’ve put together a list of health benefits of strawberries for you to enjoy them all year round.

Strawberry Cobbler Pioneer Woman

It’s hard to find a person who doesn’t love strawberry desserts, and this strawberry cobbler is one of the best! Just like its cousin blackberry cobbler, this recipe starts with a stir-together batter that’s poured into a skillet and topped with sweetened berries. It’s blissfully simple, and perfect for those days when all you want is a quick and easy dessert.

What’s the difference between a cobbler and a crisp?

Crisps generally have a crunchy topping that includes nuts or oats. Cobblers, on the other hand, typically involve one of two topping styles—a biscuit-like topping or a batter-like topping, like this recipe. It’s definitely the easiest (and some say the most delicious!) type of cobbler out there.

Can you use frozen fruit to make strawberry cobbler?

Yes! The only trick is to make sure to thaw the frozen strawberries completely, and to let it drain in a colander before proceeding with this recipe. Frozen fruit contains more liquid and that extra liquid can lead to a soupy cobbler if it’s not drained before using.

Can you make strawberry cobbler in a casserole dish?

This recipe calls to use a trusty 10-inch cast-iron skillet, but it’s perfectly acceptable to bake this cobbler in a different dish. A 9-by-9-inch baking dish will work, or double the recipe and prepare this cobbler in a 9-by-13-inch casserole dish to feed a crowd.

  • YIELDS:8 – 10 servings
  • PREP TIME:0 hours 12 mins
  • TOTAL TIME:1 hour 50 mins
the pioneer woman's strawberry cobbler recipe

Ingredients 

  • stick salted butter (1/2 cup)
  • 1 1/4 c. 
  • granulated sugar, divided
  • 1 c. 
  • self-rising flour
  • 1 c. 
  • whole milk
  • 2 tbsp. 
  • cornstarch
  • 2 lb. 
  • strawberries, halved (about 6 1/2 cups)
  • 1 tbsp. 
  • fresh lemon juice
  • Vanilla ice cream, for serving

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°. Add the butter to a 10-inch cast iron skillet; place in the oven for 5 minutes or until the butter is completely melted, swirling the pan occasionally. Remove from the oven and set aside.
  2. Whisk together 1 cup of the sugar with the flour and milk in a medium bowl. Whisk together the remaining 1/4 cup of sugar and the cornstarch in another medium bowl. Add the strawberries and lemon juice to the cornstarch mixture, stirring to combine.
  3. Pour the batter into the melted butter in the cast iron skillet; do not stir. Spoon the strawberry mixture and any juices left in the bowl evenly over the batter, without stirring.
  4. Place the skillet on a foil-lined baking sheet and bake on the middle oven rack until golden brown and bubbly, 60 to 75 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack at least 15 minutes before serving with vanilla ice cream, if you like.

Strawberry Cobbler Squares

  • Level: Easy
  • Total: 1 hr (includes cooling time)
  • Active: 15 min
  • Yield: 18 servings

Ingredients

Filling:

  • 3 cups chopped strawberries
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar 
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch 
  • 1 lime, zested and juiced

Crust and Crumble:

  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 1/2 sticks (20 tablespoons) salted butter, cubed and chilled, plus more for the pan
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar 
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder 
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream 
  • 2 tablespoons turbinado sugar 

Icing:

  • 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice 

Directions

  1. For the filling: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Add the strawberries, granulated sugar, cornstarch and lime zest and juice to a bowl. Toss to combine and set aside.
  3. For the crust and crumble: In a food processor, combine the flour, butter, brown sugar and baking powder. Pulse until a loose crumb forms; continue to pulse as you add the cream.
  4. Grease a 9-by-13-inch pan with butter. Dump two-thirds of the flour mixture onto the prepared pan and press flat. Top with the strawberry mixture, spreading it into an even layer. Sprinkle over the remaining flour mixture, followed by the turbinado sugar.
  5. Bake the bars until the top is golden and the strawberry layer is thick and bubbling, 28 to 30 minutes. Remove and allow to cool.
  6. For the icing: Whisk together the powdered sugar and lime juice until smooth.
  7. Cut the cobbler into small squares and drizzle with the icing. Add to a platter and serve.

STRAWBERRY COBBLER

This scrumptious easy Strawberry Cobbler combines fresh sun-ripened strawberries with a flaky buttery biscuit topping. It is one of our favorite spring and summer desserts and an extra special treat when served a la mode or with fresh whipped cream.  I love to serve it on Sundays when the whole family gathers for dinner.

Strawberries are one of my favorite berries.  I mean what is not to love about them?  They are absolutely perfect from their beautiful ruby red flesh to their naturally sweet aroma and flavor.  Strawberry Daiquiri, Strawberry Bread, Strawberry Rhubarb Pie, and this cobbler are just a few of our favorite strawberry recipes.

HOW TO MAKE STRAWBERRY COBBLER

  1. Stir together the sugar, cornstarch, lemon juice and lemon zest in a large measuring cup or small bowl.  Pour the mixture over the strawberries in a large bowl and stir to coat.  Spoon the strawberry mixture into a 9×13 inch baking pan or equivalent size.
  2. Then in large bowl whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt.  Next using a pastry knife cut in the butter until crumbly.  Now stir in the buttermilk just until combined.  Drop the dough by rounded tablespoons onto the strawberries and bake in a preheated oven for about 35-40 minutes.  Finally cool slightly before serving.

RECIPE NOTES AND HELPFUL TIPS FOR STRAWBERRY COBBLER

  • Slice the strawberries fairly thick so there is still some texture and substance to the strawberries as they tend to break down fast when cooked.
  • Make your buttermilk by combining 1/2 cup milk with 1/2 tablespoon lemon juice or white vinegar.  Let it sit for 5 minutes before using in the recipe.
  • This recipe is delicious with a scoop of vanilla ice cream or fresh whipped cream.
  • For best results bake this recipe the same day it is is enjoyed while the strawberries still have plenty of texture and the cobbler is still flaky and buttery.
  • Allow the cobbler to cool completely before covering with wrap.  You don’t want the added moisture to get to it.
  • Store leftover in the refrigerators in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

CAN YOU USE FROZEN STRAWBERRIES?

Yes you can however the berries will break down a little more than fresh berries.  Thaw the strawberries first or at least enough to slice them.  Because frozen fruit holds a lot of moisture add 1 additional tablespoon of cornstarch for a total of 3 1/2 tablespoons.

Health Benefits Of Strawberries

The potentially antioxidant-rich strawberry can help improve heart health and lower your blood pressure. They can also help better your brain function, and enhance eye and skin health, arthritis, and gout. The possible polyphenolic content of strawberries may make them beneficial for improving the immune system, and reduce the signs of premature aging.

What is Strawberry?

A strawberry (Fragaria) is a sweet, red heart-shaped fruit, which is much-loved for its delicious taste and for its nutritional benefits. Native to many parts of the world, it belongs to the rose family and has a distinct aroma. Despite its name, a strawberry is not a berry from a botanical standpoint. It is an aggregate accessory fruit, which means that the fleshy part is not derived from the plant ovaries. Instead, each visible seed covering its outside is borne from one of the ovaries of the flower. The strawberry leaves are also eaten raw cooked and cooked. One can also take it as an antioxidant-rich strawberry tea.

Strawberries are seasonal fruits that grow in bushes. There are three types of strawberries:

  • June-bearing strawberries
  • Everbearing strawberries
  • Day-neutral strawberry variety

Strawberry Nutrition

Strawberries are packed with vitamins and minerals such as vitamins C and K, folate, potassium, manganese, and magnesium. They are low-calorie, fiber-rich, and abundant in antioxidants and polyphenols. According to the USDA, one cup of strawberries provides 3 g of fiber and 12 g of carbohydrates. 

Calories in a Strawberry

According to the USDA, a 100 g serving of raw strawberries contains about 32 calories. This makes them a low-calorie food. You can eat these without worrying about any unhealthy weight gain. 

Health Benefits of Strawberry

Let’s look at the most popular health benefits of strawberries in detail below.

May Improve Heart Function

Strawberries have possibly high levels of heart-healthy antioxidants such as ellagic acid and flavonoids like anthocyanin, catechin, quercetin, and kaempferol. According to one research, these phenolic compounds help lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases by inhibiting the formation of total and LDL (bad) cholesterol. 

Another Harvard Medical School study found that young and middle-aged women who had three or more servings of a half cup of strawberries or blueberries weekly were 34 percent less likely to have a heart attack. The possibly high levels of anthocyanins in the berries relax the blood vessels, helping lower blood pressure, and preventing cardiovascular problems. The high fiber content, vitamin C, and folate in strawberries form an ideal cardiac health trio. They can reduce the cholesterol in the arteries and vessels. 

May Boost Brain Function

Strawberries are rich in iodine, vitamin C, and phytochemicals, which help maintain the proper functioning of the nervous system. Potassium, also in strawberries, has known to have been linked to improved cognitive function by increasing blood flow to the brain. Harvard research shows that higher consumption of flavonoids, particularly from blueberries and strawberries, reduced rates of cognitive decline in older people. 

May Aid in Skin Care

Strawberries can protect your skin from pollutants and UV damage. A 2017 Italian study suggests that strawberry-based formulations for cosmetic purposes can protect the skin against UV-induced damage. Using strawberry masks regularly can keep the skin fresh and clean. Another study suggested that strawberries may be useful in preventing free radical-induced skin damage because of its antioxidant properties. 

How to use: To make an easy face mask for glowing skin, crush 4-5 strawberries and mix the pulp with a tablespoon of honey. Apply on the face, leave it until dry, and wash off. Strawberry moisturizing lip balms also help keep lips hydrated.

Strawberries are seasonal fruits that grow in bushes.

May Aid in Eye Care

Eating strawberries can prevent eye conditions like dry eyes, degeneration of the optic nerves, macular degeneration, vision defects, and increased susceptibility to infections. A paper exploring nutritional solutions for age-related eye diseases recommended strawberries for their possibly rich vitamin C content. Published in the journal, Clinical Interventions in Aging, it found that vitamin C provided the eye with vital antioxidant protection. 

Another study, published in the journal Nutrients in 2018, termed vitamin C as an essential nutrient in repairing the tissues in the eye. It reviewed different studies to conclude that vitamin C-rich foods like strawberry could prevent glaucoma.

May Aid in Managing Diabetes

Eating strawberries may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes as strawberries have a low glycemic index, which a study published in the British Medical Journal confirmed . Another study  funded by The Canadian Institutes of Health Research showed that eating strawberries improved glycemic control among people with diabetes. Another research shows that it can help in managing hyperglycemia-linked type 2 diabetes. 

May Boost Immunity

Vitamin C, present in strawberries and many other types of fruits, helps boost the immune system and helps in curing common cough and cold. One cup of strawberries can meet your daily requirement of vitamin C. 

May Provide Relief from Arthritis & Gout

The Arthritis Foundation recommends eating strawberries as they are abundant in antioxidants and detoxifiers, which help reduce gout and arthritis pain. They also aid in preventing arthritis symptoms such as degeneration of muscles and tissues, drying up of the lubricating fluids in the joints, and accumulation of toxic substances and acids (such as uric acid) in the body. 

May Aid in Weight Loss

Strawberries are popular among people who want to lose weight. Not only are they delicious, they can also help you lose weight. According to the book 25 Fat Burning Juice Recipes, strawberries boost the production of adiponectin and leptin, both of which are fat-burning hormones. They may help reduce appetite, decrease blood sugar, and reduce body weight and fat, all of which promote weight loss. Also, strawberry lemonade sparkling water is a natural way of flavoring water and increasing liquid intake, which also helps in shedding pounds. 

May Help in Preventing Birth Defects

Folic acid is a necessary nutrient, especially during pregnancy, as it helps in preventing birth defects. Strawberries are a good source for folic acid. 250 gm of strawberry can meet 30 percent of your daily folate intake.

May Aid in Improving Bone Health

A 2017 research study shows that strawberries have possibly analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties and may help fight osteoarthritis. This US study was conducted on obese adults with evidence of knee osteoarthritis. Only a quarter cup of berries can provide the needed antioxidants to help manage inflammation levels and prevent free radical damage. Also, manganese, vitamins C and K, and potassium help improve bone health. 

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