Top Fruits With Fiber

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Top Fruits With Fiber is the best sources of fiber fresh fruits such as apples, blueberries, raspberries, and pears. Some other great options are leafy greens such as kale and chard. Fiber is an essential nutrient that doesn’t get much press. But consuming sufficient fiber from foods can help prevent disease and improve human health. This article lists some fruits that have amazing amounts of fiber per serving.

Your Ultimate High-Fiber Grocery List

The next time you go food shopping, put these items in your cart. They’re great sources of fiber, which can cut your LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, is good for your digestion, and helps you feel full. (Related: What is sulfur, and why does your body need it?)

Fruits and Vegetables

  • Apples, bananas, oranges, strawberries all have around 3 to 4 grams of fiber. (Eat the apple peels — that’s where the most fiber is!)
  • Raspberries win the fiber race at 8 grams per cup.
  • Exotic fruits are also good sources of fiber: A mango has 5 grams, a persimmon has 6, and 1 cup of guava has about 9.
  • Dark-colored vegetables. In general, the darker the color of the vegetable, the higher the fiber content. Carrots, beets, and broccoli are fiber-rich. Collard greens and Swiss chard have 4 grams of fiber per cup.  Artichokes are among the highest-fiber veggies, at 10 grams for a medium-sized one.
  • Potatoes. Russet, red, and sweet potatoes all have at least 3 grams of fiber in a medium-sized spud, if you eat the skin and all.

Dry and Canned Goods

  • Stock up on beans. Navy and white beans are the most fiber-rich, but all beans are fiber-packed. Any of these is a good choice for your shopping cart: garbanzo, kidney, lima, or pinto beans. They make great soups and chilis, and are a flavorful addition to salads. Beans are also high in protein, so if you’re cutting back on red meat, they’re a healthy, filling substitute.
  • Include other legumes. Peas, soybeans (edamame), and lentils are also high in fiber.

Bread and Grains

  • Check cereal labels. Most cereals have at least some fiber content, but they’re not all created equal. Any cereal with 5 or more grams of fiber per serving is a good source.
  • Whole-grain breads. Seven-grain, dark rye, cracked wheat, and pumpernickel breads are good choices.
  • Whole grains. Bulgur wheat, brown rice, wild rice, and barley are all tasty substitutions for white rice.

The Snack Aisle

  • Nuts and seeds.An ounce of of sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, pistachios, or almonds gives you at least 3 grams of fiber. They are also high in calories, though, so make a little go a long way.
  • Popcorn. Three cups of air-popped popcorn have about 4 grams of fiber.

The Cold Case

  • Try foods with fiber added. Milk and other dairy products, and most juices, naturally have no or low fiber. New products, however, are changing that picture: Look for labels on orange juice, milk, and yogurt that say fiber is added or “fiber fortified.”

29 Fruits High in Fiber

29 Fruits High in Fiber

Whole fresh fruits are extremely nutritious and healthy in no small part to being high in fiber.

Passion fruit provides the most fiber of all fruits with 24.5 grams (88% DV) per cup. Low in sugar and calories, berries are also a great source of fiber.

Other high fiber fruits include avocados, persimmons, kiwifruit, pears, and oranges. The current daily value (DV) for fiber is 28 grams.

Note: Since dried fruits are high in sugar, they were not included in the main list of 29 fruits. Click here to see a list of all dried fruits high in fiber.

Below is a list of 29 fruits high in fiber, for more, see the complete ranking of over 100 fruits high in fiber.


List of Fruits High in Fiber

Passion Fruit

#1: Passion-Fruit (Granadilla)

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
25g
(88% DV)
10g
(37% DV)
21g
(77% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Passion Fruit (Granadilla).

Half an avocado

#2: Avocados

Fiber
per Avocado
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
13g
(48% DV)
7g
(24% DV)
8g
(30% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Avocados

Half a guava

#3: Guavas

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
9g
(32% DV)
5g
(19% DV)
16g
(57% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Guavas.

A bunch of raspberries

#4: Raspberries

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
8g
(29% DV)
7g
(23% DV)
25g
(89% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Raspberries

Blackberries on the stem

#5: Blackberries

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
8g
(27% DV)
5g
(19% DV)
25g
(88% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Blackberries.

Pomegranate

#6: Pomegranate

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
7g
(25% DV)
4g
(14% DV)
10g
(34% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Pomegranates

Persimmons

#7: Persimmon

Fiber
per Fruit
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
6g
(22% DV)
4g
(13% DV)
10g
(37% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Fuyu Persimmon.

Slices of kiwifruit

#8: Kiwifruit

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
5g
(19% DV)
3g
(11% DV)
10g
(35% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Kiwifruit.

Pears

#9: Pears

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(16% DV)
3g
(11% DV)
11g
(39% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Pears

Slices of orange

#10: Oranges

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(15% DV)
2g
(9% DV)
10g
(36% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Oranges

Blueberries

#11: Blueberries

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(13% DV)
2g
(9% DV)
8g
(30% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Blueberries

Tangerines

#12: Tangerines

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
4g
(13% DV)
2g
(6% DV)
7g
(24% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Tangerines

Strawberries

#13: Strawberries

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
3g
(12% DV)
2g
(7% DV)
13g
(45% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Strawberries.

Cherries

#14: Cherries

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
3g
(12% DV)
2g
(8% DV)
7g
(24% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Cherries (Sweet).

Half an apricot

#15: Apricots

Fiber
per Cup
Fiber
per 100g
Fiber
per 200 Calories
3g
(11% DV)
2g
(7% DV)
8g
(30% DV)

Nutrition Facts for Apricots.

22 High Fiber Foods You Should Eat

Fiber is incredibly important.

It leaves your stomach undigested and ends up in your colon, where it feeds friendly gut bacteria, leading to various health benefits

Certain types of fiber may also promote weight loss, lower blood sugar levels, and fight constipation

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends consuming about 14 grams of fiber for every 1,000 calories you consume daily. This translates to roughly 24 grams of fiber for women and 38 grams for men

Unfortunately, an estimated 95% of American adults and children don’t meet the recommended daily fiber intake. In America, the average daily fiber intake is estimated to be 16.2 grams

Fortunately, increasing your fiber intake is relatively easy — simply integrate high fiber foods into your diet.

What is fiber?

Fiber is a blanket term that applies to any type of carbohydrate that your body can’t digest. The fact your body doesn’t use fiber for fuel doesn’t make it less valuable to your overall health.

Dietary fiber can offer the following benefits when you consume it:

  • Reducing cholesterol. Fiber’s presence in the digestive tract can help reduce the body’s cholesterol absorption. This is especially true if you take statins, which are medications to lower cholesterol, and use fiber supplements like psyllium fiber
  • Promoting a healthy weight. High fiber foods like fruits and vegetables tend to be lower in calories. Also, fiber’s presence can slow digestion in the stomach to help you feel fuller for longer .
  • Adding bulk to the digestive tract. Those who struggle with constipation or a generally sluggish digestive tract may wish to add fiber to their diet. Fiber naturally adds bulk to the digestive tract, as your body doesn’t digest it. This stimulates the intestines.
  • Promoting blood sugar control. It can take your body longer to break down high fiber foods. This helps you maintain more consistent blood sugar levels, which is especially helpful for those with diabetes
  • Reducing gastrointestinal cancer risk. Eating enough fiber can have protective effects against certain cancer types, including colon cancer. There are many reasons for this, including that some types of fiber, such as the pectin in apples, may have antioxidant-like properties

Fiber offers many health benefits, but it’s important to incorporate fiber-containing foods gradually over the course of a few days to avoid adverse effects, such as bloating and gas.

Drinking plenty of water while you up your fiber intake may also help keep these symptoms at bay.

Here are 22 high fiber foods that are both healthy and satisfying.

High fiber foods you should be eating

1. Pears (3.1 grams)

The pear is a popular fruit that’s both tasty and nutritious. It’s one of the best fruit sources of fiber.

Fiber content: 5.5 grams in a medium-sized, raw pear, or 3.1 grams per 100 grams

2. Strawberries (2 grams)

Strawberries are a delicious, healthy option that can be eaten fresh.

Interestingly, they’re also among the most nutrient-dense fruits you can eat, boasting loads of vitamin C, manganese, and various powerful antioxidants. Try some in this banana strawberry smoothie.

Fiber content: 3 grams in 1 cup of fresh strawberries, or 2 grams per 100 grams

3. Avocado (6.7 grams)

The avocado is a unique fruit. Instead of being high in carbs, it’s loaded with healthy fats.

Avocados are very high in vitamin C, potassium, magnesium, vitamin E, and various B vitamins. They also have numerous health benefits. Try them in one of these delicious avocado recipes.

Fiber content: 10 grams in 1 cup of raw avocado, or 6.7 grams per 100 grams

4. Apples (2.4 grams)

Apples are among the tastiest and most satisfying fruits you can eat. They are also relatively high in fiber.

We especially like them in salads.

Fiber content: 4.4 grams in a medium-sized, raw apple, or 2.4 grams per 100 grams

5. Raspberries (6.5 grams)

Raspberries are highly nutritious with a very strong flavor. They’re loaded with vitamin C and manganese.

Try blending some into this raspberry tarragon dressing.

Fiber content: One cup of raw raspberries contains 8 grams of fiber, or 6.5 grams per 100 grams

6. Bananas (2.6 grams)

Bananas are a good source of many nutrients, including vitamin C, vitamin B6, and potassium.

A green or unripe banana also contains a significant amount of resistant starch, a type of indigestible carbohydrate that functions like fiber. Try them in a nut butter sandwich for a hit of protein, too.

Fiber content: 3.1 grams in a medium-sized banana, or 2.6 grams per 100 grams

Other high fiber fruits

  • Blueberries: 2.4 grams per 100-gram serving
  • Blackberries: 5.3 grams per 100-gram serving

7. Carrots (2.8 grams)

The carrot is a root vegetable that’s tasty, crunchy, and highly nutritious.

It’s high in vitamin K, vitamin B6, magnesium, and beta carotene, an antioxidant that gets turned into vitamin A in your body.

Toss some diced carrots into your next veggie-loaded soup.

Fiber content: 3.6 grams in 1 cup of raw carrots, or 2.8 grams per 100 grams

8. Beets (2.8 grams)

The beet, or beetroot, is a root vegetable that’s high in various important nutrients, such as folate, iron, copper, manganese, and potassium.

Beets are also loaded with inorganic nitrates, which are nutrients shown to have various benefits related to blood pressure regulation and exercise performance

Give them a go in this lemon dijon beet salad.

Fiber content: 3.8 grams per cup of raw beets, or 2.8 grams per 100 grams

9. Broccoli (2.6 grams)

Broccoli is a type of cruciferous vegetable and one of the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet.

It’s loaded with vitamin C, vitamin K, folate, B vitamins, potassium, iron, and manganese and contains antioxidants and potent cancer-fighting nutrients.

Broccoli is also relatively high in protein, compared with most vegetables. We like turning them into a slaw for various uses.

Fiber content: 2.4 grams per cup, or 2.6 grams per 100 grams

10. Artichoke (5.4 grams)

The artichoke doesn’t make headlines very often. However, this vegetable is high in many nutrients and one of the world’s best sources of fiber.

Just wait until you try them roasted.

Fiber content: 6.9 grams in 1 raw globe or French artichoke, or 5.4 grams per 100 grams

11. Brussels sprouts (3.8 grams)

The Brussels sprout is a cruciferous vegetable that’s related to broccoli.

They’re very high in vitamin K, potassium, folate, and potent cancer-fighting antioxidants.

Try out Brussels sprouts roasted with apples and bacon or drizzled with balsamic vinegar.

Fiber content: 3.3 grams per cup of raw Brussels sprouts, or 3.7 grams per 100 grams

Other high fiber vegetables

Almost all vegetables contain significant amounts of fiber. Other notable examples include:

  • Kale: 3.6 grams
  • Spinach: 2.2 grams
  • Tomatoes: 1.2 grams

All values are given for raw vegetables.

12. Lentils (7.3 grams)

Lentils are very cheap and among the most nutritious foods. They’re very high in protein and loaded with many important nutrients.

This lentil soup is spiced up with cumin, coriander, turmeric, and cinnamon.

Fiber content: 13.1 grams per cup of cooked lentils, or 7.3 grams per 100 grams

6 Kinds of Fruit That Are Loaded With Fiber—Plus, Delicious Ways to Eat More of Them

A high-fiber diet is key to balanced nutrition, and these tasty types of fruit can help you get there.

Hey, want to talk about fiber? We didn’t think so. But if your health is important to you, it’s one of the most important topics to address. “Fiber helps so many aspects of health, from gut health to cholesterol,” says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, a plant-based registered dietitian. “In addition to helping keep your body functioning optimally, eating fiber also helps keep you fuller for longer, which can be beneficial for weight management.”

And if you’re like most Americans, you’re not getting nearly enough. According to the 2020–2025 U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, women ages 31 to 50 should get 25 grams of fiber daily, and men in the same age range should aim for 31 grams per day. While most people believe they get enough fiber, more than 90 percent of women and 97 percent of men fall short of these recommendations, largely due to the overconsumption of processed foods and drinks, which have been stripped of their fiber (and much of their nutrient value).

The solution? More fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains. And an easy—and undeniably delicious—place to start is with fruit. Nature’s candy isn’t just filled with disease-busting antioxidants, minerals, and other essential nutrients, but it’s also an excellent, natural source of dietary fiber. Not all fruits are equal in terms of their fiber content, though. And why not get the most bang for your buck? These are the highest-fiber fruits around.

6 High-Fiber Fruits to Eat Regularly

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Berries

HIghest-Fiber fruits berries: bowl of mixed berries

Raspberries and blackberries top the list with around 8 grams of fiber each per cup, but all members of the berry family are great sources of fiber (along with other antioxidants and other nutrients). It’s not hard to find ways to incorporate berries into your diet (nothing beats a bowl of local summer berries topped with homemade whipped cream!)

But if you’re looking for more berry inspo, try adding half a cup to your morning oatmeal, serving them up for dinner in a blackberry and steak salad, or blending them into a smoothie with oats for a double-whammy of fiber. Just remember, if high fiber is your goal, always choose smoothies over juices, as juicing removes the fibrous content of fruits and vegetables.

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Tropical Fruits

High-Fiber fruit: sliced pineapple on a wooden cutting board

Tropical fruits are not only a fun way to mix up your daily fruit and veggie intake, but they’re also excellent sources of fiber. Picks like passionfruit, mangos, guava, kiwis, dragon fruit, and pineapple all weigh in between 5 grams (kiwi) to 25 grams (passionfruit) per cup.

Tropical fruits are fantastic options for keeping smoothies refreshing—check out this creamy mango-turmeric blend with a secret ingredient that may surprise you. Beyond the blender, tropical fruits make divine salsas to top meat, fish, and tacos.

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Apples

HIgh-Fiber Fruits: apples in a bowl and on a table

The key to maximizing the fiber content of apples is to eat the skin (after a good scrubbing, of course). One medium apple with the skin on has about 4.8 grams of fiber, but if you peel it, that number drops down to 2 grams. Enjoy sliced apples as a snack with a smear of nut butter, make a chunky apple and raisin sauce to spoon over a protein, or partake in the sweet crunch that thinly sliced apples give a crisp watercress salad.

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Prunes

High-Fiber Fruit: prunes, dried plums, in a bowl with a spoon

The old adage is true: Dried plums, aka prunes, are chock-full of fiber, with around 4 grams per three pieces or 8 grams per cup. But it’s not just the fiber that makes prunes a commonly prescribed remedy for constipation. “Prunes are a natural source of sorbitol, which helps to stimulate digestion by helping to move water into the large intestine,” Gorin explains.

The combination of fiber and the sorbitol make these sweet and chewy treats effective in helping get things moving. One of the best ways to eat prunes is to heat them on the stove with a little water, honey, cinnamon, and lemon juice, and then let them plump up. After simmering for a few minutes, let cool and serve over yogurt or oatmeal. Prunes also make a delicious addition to chicken or pork dishes.

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