Vitamin A For Blackheads

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As we all know, blackheads are the bane of our existence.

They’re ugly, they’re embarrassing, and they make us feel like we should never leave the house.

But what if there was a way to get rid of those pesky blackheads without having to pay a dermatologist thousands of dollars or resorting to harsh chemical peels?

Well, there is! And it’s called vitamin A.

Vitamin A is an essential nutrient for healthy skin, and it plays a role in the production of keratinocytes—the cells that help your skin stay healthy and strong. When you apply vitamin A topically on your skin, you can help prevent acne and other conditions that lead to clogged pores (like blackheads).

Vitamin A For Blackheads

Acne can strike at any age. Although it’s more common among teenagers, and sometimes in women going through menopause, acne affects an estimated 50 million people in the United States each year.

Acne surfaces during times of hormonal imbalance. When glands produce more oil than normal, skin pores get clogged, allowing bacteria (and pimples) to grow.

Pimples come in many different forms and depths, including blackheads whiteheads, cysts, and nodules. To banish them, research has long pointed to topical medications such as benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics like tetracycline, and oral drugs that contain vitamin A, such as isotretinoin, which is for moderate to severe acne.

Alternatively, some seek more natural treatments such oral vitamin and mineral supplements. Do natural remedies also work? And if so, which ones? Find out below.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is a possible remedy for acne, but you need to make sure you’re getting it the right way.

Vitamin A oral supplements don’t work the same as topical vitamin A, according to clinicians at the University of Michigan. In fact, they caution against the supplement, as it can do more harm than good.

Because the vitamin is fat-soluble, it builds up in your body, and a high intake of more than 10,000 international units (IU) can be toxic. This is especially true during pregnancy, so women who are planning on becoming pregnant should check with their doctors before starting any supplements.

But as a topical medication, vitamin A can help with your acne. Most topical medications chemically alter the vitamin into a retinoid that you can apply to the skin. According to the Mayo Clinic, retinoids are the most effective treatment for acne because of their ability to regenerate and heal the skin rapidly, so that you quickly have fresh skin.

Popular retinoid brands — in the order of least side effects — include tazarotene (Tazorac) and adapalene (Differin). You can get them only with a prescription.

Pregnant women shouldn’t take retinoids. The substance also weakens your skin’s natural UV protection, so people using retinoids should take care to avoid long exposure to the sun and use sunscreen.

Zinc

Zinc is a mineral that can also help with acne. You can take it as an oral supplement or as a topical treatment.

A recent reviewTrusted Source of the past studies on the topic found that zinc can decrease oil production in the skin, and can protect against bacterial infection and inflammation.

You only need small amounts of zinc in your body. The Office of Dietary SupplementsTrusted Source recommends a daily allowance for adults of 8-11 milligrams (mg). There is some evidenceTrusted Source that a relatively safe dose of 30 mg can help treat acne. Higher amounts of zinc may be harmful. Some people have reported becoming ill from taking too much zinc, and excessive zinc intake can lead to a copper deficiency.

Topical lotions that contain zinc can also help with acne. One studyTrusted Source found that applying a lotion of 1.2 percent zinc acetate and 4 percent erythromycin significantly cleared the skin.

Myth and truths

We’ve talked about how vitamin A and zinc can help your acne, but you’ve also probably heard of vitamin E as a possible remedy as well. Acne’s relationship with vitamin E isn’t as well studied as with vitamin A or zinc. However, in a recent studyTrusted Source, people with acne were shown to have vitamin E, A, and zinc deficiencies. So it wouldn’t hurt to make sure you get your daily recommended intake of the 15 mg of vitamin E.

Shop for vitamin E supplements online.

Tea tree oil may also be able to help with your acne. In one studyTrusted Source, 30 people used tea tree oil gel for 45 days, and another 30 people used a placebo. Those who used the gel saw greater improvements in their acne.

Tea tree oil is a good alternative to benzoyl peroxide, a well-known ingredient in acne creams. It has similar effects, wiping out bacteria and decreasing oil production. Both are available over the counter, but tea tree oil seems to cause fewer side effects like itching, burning, and peeling.

Blackhead Remover Face Black Mask
  • Dry the cleansed area and appy the masque on desired area(avoid eybrow,eyes,and lips).Peel it off after 20-30 minutes.To achieve better results,apply toner so as to tighten and cleanse the pores thoroughly.
  • Ingredients: activated carbon (bamboo charcoal), oat extract, grapefruit, vitamin B5,rosemary extract, calendula extract, vitamin A, vitamin E, citrus peel extract.
  • Long-term use of the computer, watching television
  • Due in part because skin caused by acne, acne
  • Oily skin strawberry nose. Nose large pores blackheads

 Blackhead Remover Face Black Mask – Peel Off Purifying Quality Black Peel off Charcoal Mask – Best Mud Facial Mask Packaging May Vary.

vitamin a cured my acne

There’s a lot of research backing up the use of topical vitamin A for acne. But research on oral vitamin A for acne has been mixed.

Older researchTrusted Source couldn’t support oral vitamin A as an effective acne treatment, but researchers did say it could possibly prevent acne vulgaris from getting worse.

More recent researchTrusted Source concluded oral vitamin A is effective at treating acne, but the study was small and of low quality.

Overall, vitamin A as an acne treatment is most promising as a topical treatment only.

While it’s important to get enough vitamin A in your diet, this isn’t the best acne treatment solution. Taking too much can harm your health.

How much should you get daily?

Vitamin A content on foods and supplements is listed in international units (IU). The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) states the daily value of vitamin A for people ages 4 and up is 5,000 IU.

You shouldn’t take more vitamin A just for the sake of treating acne. This could lead to severe health consequences, like liver damage.

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Food sources of vitamin A

Vitamin A is an antioxidant, which may help fight inflammation and free radicals in your skin — all which may contribute to acne.

Most people can get enough vitamin A through diet alone. The following foods are rich in vitamin A:

  • orange and yellow vegetables, such as carrots and sweet potatoes
  • cantaloupe
  • apricots
  • mangoes
  • green leafy vegetables
  • salmon
  • beef liver

Overall, though, the AAD says there’s no specific diet proven to treat acne. The only exceptions are to avoid sugar and dairy, which could possibly aggravate breakouts in people who are already prone to acne.

Getting enough vitamin A in your diet can help promote overall skin health, but it’s not likely to treat acne alone. Instead, focus on a balanced diet with lots of fruits and vegetables for healthier skin.

Vitamin A supplements

Vitamin A supplements may help improve your overall immune system and your skin health. However, consider taking supplements only if you don’t already get enough vitamin A through diet alone, or if you don’t already take a multivitamin.

Too much vitamin A can lead to adverse health effects, including liver damage. Birth defects are also possible if you take excessive amounts of vitamin A while pregnant.

Side effects from too much vitamin A in supplement form can include:

  • dizziness
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • headaches
  • coma

It’s important to note that these side effects are linked to supplemental forms of vitamin A only. Excessive amounts of beta carotene found in vitamin A-rich fruits and vegetables won’t cause life-threatening side effects.

Also keep in mind that the FDA doesn’t monitor the purity or quality of supplements. It’s important to talk with your doctor before you begin taking any to weigh the benefits and risks for you.

Using a topical vitamin A product

Despite the potential antioxidant benefits of vitamin A, topical formulas show the most promise for acne treatment. These can come in the form of creams and serums.

A 2012 reviewTrusted Source found concentrations as low as 0.25 percent may provide benefits without side effects. If your dermatologist thinks you’d benefit from a higher concentration, they might order a prescription-strength cream.

When you first start using topical vitamin A, it’s important to begin gradually so your skin gets used to the product. This could mean using it every other day at first before you eventually use it every single day.

Beginning gradually can also reduce the risk of side effects, such as redness and peeling.

Retinoids can also increase your skin’s sensitivity to the sun. Be sure to wear sunscreen every single day to prevent sun damage.

The takeaway

Vitamin A is just one potential treatment for acne. Your dermatologist can help you decide what treatment measures are best depending on the severity and history of your skin health.

Good skin care practices can also go a long way for acne-prone skin. In addition to eating a nutritious diet and using topical products, getting enough sleep, water, and exercise can also promote better skin health.

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